Injured owl rescued in Sunderland

  • The Sunderland Police Department rescued and safely brought this injured owl to Tom Ricardi, who runs Mass Birds of Prey Rehab out of his home in Conway, on Friday night. Ricardi said the owl had an injured wing after most likely being struck by a vehicle and will be releasable as early as January 2019. Courtesy Sunderland Police Department’s Facebook page

  • The Sunderland Police Department rescued and safely brought this injured owl to Tom Ricardi, who runs Mass Birds of Prey Rehab out of his home in Conway, on Friday night. Ricardi said the owl had an injured wing after most likely being struck by a vehicle and will be releasable as early as January 2019. Courtesy Sunderland Police Department’s Facebook page

  • The Sunderland Police Department rescued and safely brought this injured owl to Tom Ricardi, who runs Mass Birds of Prey Rehab out of his home in Conway, on Friday night. Ricardi said the owl had an injured wing after most likely being struck by a vehicle and will be releasable as early as January 2019. Courtesy Sunderland Police Department’s Facebook page

Staff Writer
Published: 12/18/2018 11:34:07 PM

SUNDERLAND – The Sunderland Police Department and a good Samaritan rescued an injured owl on Montague Road on Friday night and safely brought it to raptor rehabilitator Tom Ricardi, who expects the bird to make a full recovery.

Ricardi, who runs Mass. Birds of Prey Rehab out of his home in Conway, said the roughly 2-pound barred owl’s injured wing is not broken and he plans to release the bird in the spring or possibly in January, if the weather breaks. He said the owl, probably a female, was likely struck by a vehicle.

According to the Sunderland Police’s Facebook page, an officer and a passer-by wrapped the injured bird in a blanket and brought it to Ricardi. The Facebook post states the owl extended its wings with no trouble when it was taken out of the blanket.

“The owl is in great hands now!” the post reads.

Citing a fast-growing population of owls locally, Ricardi said he has received 42 owls this year, and 10 this week alone. He explained a good food supply for breeding adults produces more owls, which in turn often equals more injured owls.

“I’ve never seen so many barred owls as I have seen this year,” he said Tuesday.

He said he has treated 132 or 133 raptors this year. He said a raptor is a bird of prey, ranging from owls to eagles.


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