What are the most common symptoms of a concussion?

Thomas Talavage, co-director of the Purdue MRI Facility, prepares to test a Jefferson High School football player with biomedical engineering doctoral student Evan Breedlove. The research examines how impacts to the head affect brain function. (Purdue University photo/Andrew Hancock)

Thomas Talavage, co-director of the Purdue MRI Facility, prepares to test a Jefferson High School football player with biomedical engineering doctoral student Evan Breedlove. The research examines how impacts to the head affect brain function. (Purdue University photo/Andrew Hancock)

It is not always easy to know if someone has a concussion. You don’t have to pass out (lose consciousness) to have a concussion.

Symptoms of a concussion range from mild to severe and can last for hours, days, weeks, or even months. If you notice any symptoms of a concussion, contact your doctor.

Symptoms fit into four main categories:

Thinking and remembering

• Not thinking clearly

• Feeling slowed down

• Not being able to concentrate

• Not being able to remember new information

Physical

• Headache

• Fuzzy or blurry vision

• Nausea and vomiting

• Dizziness

• Sensitivity to light or noise

• Balance problems

• Feeling tired or having no energy

Emotional and mood

• Easily upset or angered

• Sad

• Nervous or anxious

• More emotional

Sleep

• Sleeping more than usual

• Sleeping less than usual

• Having a hard time falling asleep

Young children can have the same symptoms of a concussion as older children and adults. But sometimes it can be hard to tell if a small child has a concussion. Young children may also have symptoms like:

• Crying more than usual.

• Headache that does not go away.

• Changes in the way they play or act.

• Changes in the way they nurse, eat or sleep.

• Being upset easily or having more temper tantrums.

• A sad mood.

• Lack of interest in their usual activities or favorite toys.

• Loss of new skills, such as toilet training.

• Loss of balance and trouble walking.

• Not being able to pay attention.

— Source: WebMD

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This is the second of a four-part series on concussions and their impact on youth sports in the area. Former New England Patriot running back and 2012 NFL Hall of Fame inductee Curtis Martin had his own method of dealing with concussions. “When I would get hit, (my teammates) knew that I popped up just like that, every time I … 0

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