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Landslide covers national park road in Alaska

  • This Oct, 24, 2013 photo, released by the National Park Service shows a large landslide in Denali National Park that has covered parts of a road already inaccessible near Sable Pass, Alaska. The massive landslide rained tons of rock and soil on parts of a road that attracts tourists each summer. Crews began clearing the 200-foot stretch of Denali Park Road Friday, but park officials say it's not immediately clear if road damage or instability of the terrain will affect visitors next summer. (AP Photo/National Park Service)

    This Oct, 24, 2013 photo, released by the National Park Service shows a large landslide in Denali National Park that has covered parts of a road already inaccessible near Sable Pass, Alaska. The massive landslide rained tons of rock and soil on parts of a road that attracts tourists each summer. Crews began clearing the 200-foot stretch of Denali Park Road Friday, but park officials say it's not immediately clear if road damage or instability of the terrain will affect visitors next summer. (AP Photo/National Park Service)

  • This Oct, 24, 2013 photo, released by the National Park Service shows a large landslide in Denali National Park that has covered parts of a road already inaccessible near Sable Pass, Alaska. The massive landslide rained tons of rock and soil on parts of a road that attracts tourists each summer. Crews began clearing the 200-foot stretch of Denali Park Road Friday, but park officials say it's not immediately clear if road damage or instability of the terrain will affect visitors next summer. (AP Photo/National Park Service)

    This Oct, 24, 2013 photo, released by the National Park Service shows a large landslide in Denali National Park that has covered parts of a road already inaccessible near Sable Pass, Alaska. The massive landslide rained tons of rock and soil on parts of a road that attracts tourists each summer. Crews began clearing the 200-foot stretch of Denali Park Road Friday, but park officials say it's not immediately clear if road damage or instability of the terrain will affect visitors next summer. (AP Photo/National Park Service)

  • This Oct, 24, 2013 photo, released by the National Park Service shows a large landslide in Denali National Park that has covered parts of a road already inaccessible near Sable Pass, Alaska. The massive landslide rained tons of rock and soil on parts of a road that attracts tourists each summer. Crews began clearing the 200-foot stretch of Denali Park Road Friday, but park officials say it's not immediately clear if road damage or instability of the terrain will affect visitors next summer. (AP Photo/National Park Service)
  • This Oct, 24, 2013 photo, released by the National Park Service shows a large landslide in Denali National Park that has covered parts of a road already inaccessible near Sable Pass, Alaska. The massive landslide rained tons of rock and soil on parts of a road that attracts tourists each summer. Crews began clearing the 200-foot stretch of Denali Park Road Friday, but park officials say it's not immediately clear if road damage or instability of the terrain will affect visitors next summer. (AP Photo/National Park Service)

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — A massive landslide in Denali National Park in Alaska rained tons of rock and soil on parts of a road that attracts scores of tourists each summer, park officials said Friday.

Crews began clearing the 200-foot stretch of Denali Park Road on Friday. It was not immediately clear if road damage or instability of the terrain would affect visitors next summer, park officials said. If it turns out that there is road damage, repairs would have to be made.

“Whether or not it would delay things would depend on the extent. It’s just pretty hypothetical,” park spokeswoman Kris Fister said. “We don’t want to scare people at this point because we just really don’t know.”

For now, crews will take advantage of unseasonably mild weather conditions. They will work seven days a week for as long as possible, picking up again next spring as needed, park officials said.

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