P/cloudy
39°
P/cloudy
Hi 60° | Lo 38°

German spy chiefs to head to US for talks

EU angered over spying allegations

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses the media at the European Council building in Brussels. European leaders united in anger Thursday as they attended a summit overshadowed by reports of widespread U.S. spying on its allies, allegations German Chancellor Angela Merkel said had shattered trust in the Obama administration and undermined the crucial trans-Atlantic relationship. AP photo

    German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses the media at the European Council building in Brussels. European leaders united in anger Thursday as they attended a summit overshadowed by reports of widespread U.S. spying on its allies, allegations German Chancellor Angela Merkel said had shattered trust in the Obama administration and undermined the crucial trans-Atlantic relationship. AP photo

  • The US  flag flies  on top of the US embassy in front  of the  Reichstag building  that houses the German  Parliament, Bundestag, in Berlin, Germany. European Union leaders on Friday vowed to maintain a strong trans-Atlantic partnership despite their anger over allegations of widespread U.S. spying on its allies. France and Germany insist new surveillance rules should be agreed with the United States by the end of the year. On Thursday's opening day of the summit, the spying issue united the 28 EU leaders in criticizing the snooping  after allegations surfaced that German Chancellor Angela Merkel had one of her mobile phones tapped by U.S. services. AP photo

    The US flag flies on top of the US embassy in front of the Reichstag building that houses the German Parliament, Bundestag, in Berlin, Germany. European Union leaders on Friday vowed to maintain a strong trans-Atlantic partnership despite their anger over allegations of widespread U.S. spying on its allies. France and Germany insist new surveillance rules should be agreed with the United States by the end of the year. On Thursday's opening day of the summit, the spying issue united the 28 EU leaders in criticizing the snooping after allegations surfaced that German Chancellor Angela Merkel had one of her mobile phones tapped by U.S. services. AP photo

  • German Chancellor Angela Merkel addresses the media at the European Council building in Brussels. European leaders united in anger Thursday as they attended a summit overshadowed by reports of widespread U.S. spying on its allies, allegations German Chancellor Angela Merkel said had shattered trust in the Obama administration and undermined the crucial trans-Atlantic relationship. AP photo
  • The US  flag flies  on top of the US embassy in front  of the  Reichstag building  that houses the German  Parliament, Bundestag, in Berlin, Germany. European Union leaders on Friday vowed to maintain a strong trans-Atlantic partnership despite their anger over allegations of widespread U.S. spying on its allies. France and Germany insist new surveillance rules should be agreed with the United States by the end of the year. On Thursday's opening day of the summit, the spying issue united the 28 EU leaders in criticizing the snooping  after allegations surfaced that German Chancellor Angela Merkel had one of her mobile phones tapped by U.S. services. AP photo

BRUSSELS — German spy chiefs will travel to Washington shortly to talk with U.S. officials about the spying allegations that have so angered Europe, including whether Chancellor Angela Merkel’s cellphone was monitored by the National Security Agency.

The heads of Germany’s foreign and domestic intelligence agencies will participate in the talks with the White House and the NSA, German government spokesman Georg Streiter announced Friday.

Streiter did not give a specific date for the trip, saying it was being arranged on “relatively short notice.” He said the exact composition of the team was still being determined.

European Union leaders, meeting Friday at a summit in Brussels, vowed to maintain a strong trans-Atlantic partnership despite their anger over allegations of widespread U.S. spying on allies. Still, France and Germany are insisting the United States agree upon new surveillance rules with them this year to stop U.S. eavesdropping on their leaders, innocent civilians and companies.

“We are seeking a basis for cooperation between our (intelligence) services, which we all need and from which we have all received a great deal of information ... that is transparent, that is clear and is in keeping with the character of being partners,” Merkel told reporters.

A White House National Security Council spokeswoman said the Germans would be welcome but did not address what concessions the U.S. was prepared to offer to tamp down the spying debacle that the Guardian newspaper reports may have involved up to 35 foreign leaders.

“German officials plan to travel to Washington in coming weeks and the U.S. government looks forward to meeting with them,” Caitlin Hayden, the spokeswoman, said. “We expect a range of meetings with relevant officials across the U.S. interagency, but we do not have specific meetings to announce at this point.”

Several European leaders noted the continent’s close political and commercial ties to the U.S. must be protected as EU nations demand more assurances from the Obama administration.

“What is at stake is preserving our relations with the United States,” said French President Francois Hollande. “Trust has to be restored and reinforced.”

“The main thing is that we look to the future. The trans-Atlantic partnership was and is important,” said Lithuanian President Dalia Grybauskaite, whose nation holds the rotating presidency of the 28-country bloc.

Merkel complained to President Barack Obama on Wednesday after her government received information that her cellphone may have been monitored. Merkel and Hollande insisted that, beyond being fully briefed on what happened in the past, the European allies and Washington need to set up common rules for U.S. surveillance that does not impede the fundamental rights of its allies.

“The United States and Europe are partners, but this partnership must be built on trust and respect,” Merkel said early Friday. “That of course also includes the work of the respective intelligence services.”

Unlike Germany, France and Belgium, Britain has not complained publicly about NSA actions. Britain and the U.S. enjoy a strong, mutually beneficial intelligence-sharing program, and Prime Minister David Cameron’s spokesman has refused to comment on the controversy.

The White House may soon face other irked heads of state and government. British newspaper The Guardian said it obtained a confidential memo suggesting the NSA was able to monitor 35 world leaders’ communications in 2006.

Obama’s adviser for homeland security and counterterrorism, Lisa Monaco, wrote in an editorial published on the USA Today website that the U.S. government is not operating “unrestrained.”

The U.S. intelligence community has more restrictions and oversight than any other country, she wrote.

“We are not listening to every phone call or reading every email. Far from it.”

There are no comments yet. Be the first!
Post a Comment

You must be registered to comment on stories. Click here to register.