Arts & Entertainment: April 18 through April 21

  • Submitted photo<br/>Muppets come to Pothole Pictures Friday, Saturday<br/>Pothole Pictures is wrapping up its current season Friday and Saturday by screening “The Muppet Movie,” which first charmed audiences in 1979. Organizers say, “The first big- screen vehicle for Jim Henson’s lovable characters, ‘The Muppet Movie’ charts Kermit’s odyssey from a Georgia swamp to Hollywood fame and features a love-struck Miss Piggy, a Fozzie Bear with no sense of direction, cameos from just about every big name actor of the 1970s and the unforgettable opening musical number ‘The Rainbow Connection.’” We don’t know about you folks, but we could use a few frolicking muppets right about now. See  “Films” for more details.

    Submitted photo
    Muppets come to Pothole Pictures Friday, Saturday
    Pothole Pictures is wrapping up its current season Friday and Saturday by screening “The Muppet Movie,” which first charmed audiences in 1979. Organizers say, “The first big- screen vehicle for Jim Henson’s lovable characters, ‘The Muppet Movie’ charts Kermit’s odyssey from a Georgia swamp to Hollywood fame and features a love-struck Miss Piggy, a Fozzie Bear with no sense of direction, cameos from just about every big name actor of the 1970s and the unforgettable opening musical number ‘The Rainbow Connection.’” We don’t know about you folks, but we could use a few frolicking muppets right about now. See “Films” for more details.

  • HISTORIC DEERFIELD, 80 Old Main St., Deerfield. www.historic-deerfield.org, 413-775-7127. ∎ “Three Bags Full: All About Wool.” History Workshop. April 18 through 21, April 27 and 28. Every Saturday and Sunday, May 4 through June 30. Noon to 4:30 p.m. Drop in any time. From Colonial times to the present, spring has been the season for shearing sheep. Following shearing there is always plenty of wool to be processed and eventually made into clothing, blankets, and other warm necessities for the home. The first step in this process is washing the wool, followed by: picking, carding, spinning and dyeing. Visitors can participate in many of these steps and make a project to take home. Then, with wool in hand, families will be encouraged to follow the wool trail to the Sheldon House and the Apprentices’ Workshop to learn more about the role of wool in early New England Homes. Included with general admission: $12 adults, $5 youth (ages 6-17), free for children under 6 and members. ∎ “Cartographic Encounters: Exploring the Nature of Early Maps,” a new course on antique maps continues. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Bartels Seminar Room of the Flynt Center of Early New England Life at Historic Deerfield in Deerfield. The theme of today’s course will be “Early Maps and Visual Culture.” Antique maps provide a fascinating window on the progression of geographical knowledge, and at the same time reveal contemporary views of the world. Representing a convergence of history, geography, and art, antiquarian maps are desirable to both researchers and collectors. Instructor David Bosse, Historic Deerfield’s Librarian and Curator of Maps, has worked in the map collection of the Newberry Library (Chicago) and the Clements Library, University of Michigan. www.historic-deerfield.org. Final course April 25. <br/>

    HISTORIC DEERFIELD, 80 Old Main St., Deerfield. www.historic-deerfield.org, 413-775-7127. ∎ “Three Bags Full: All About Wool.” History Workshop. April 18 through 21, April 27 and 28. Every Saturday and Sunday, May 4 through June 30. Noon to 4:30 p.m. Drop in any time. From Colonial times to the present, spring has been the season for shearing sheep. Following shearing there is always plenty of wool to be processed and eventually made into clothing, blankets, and other warm necessities for the home. The first step in this process is washing the wool, followed by: picking, carding, spinning and dyeing. Visitors can participate in many of these steps and make a project to take home. Then, with wool in hand, families will be encouraged to follow the wool trail to the Sheldon House and the Apprentices’ Workshop to learn more about the role of wool in early New England Homes. Included with general admission: $12 adults, $5 youth (ages 6-17), free for children under 6 and members. ∎ “Cartographic Encounters: Exploring the Nature of Early Maps,” a new course on antique maps continues. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Bartels Seminar Room of the Flynt Center of Early New England Life at Historic Deerfield in Deerfield. The theme of today’s course will be “Early Maps and Visual Culture.” Antique maps provide a fascinating window on the progression of geographical knowledge, and at the same time reveal contemporary views of the world. Representing a convergence of history, geography, and art, antiquarian maps are desirable to both researchers and collectors. Instructor David Bosse, Historic Deerfield’s Librarian and Curator of Maps, has worked in the map collection of the Newberry Library (Chicago) and the Clements Library, University of Michigan. www.historic-deerfield.org. Final course April 25.

  • Seth Glier returns to perform at  Greenfield Energy Park Sunday<br/>Singer-songwriter Seth Glier, a Shelburne Falls native, will take to The Station stage at the Energy Park on Miles Street in Greenfield on Sunday, Aug. 11, at 6 p.m. This show is the final show in the “Sundays in the Park” summer series. According to Glier, the last time he played the Energy Park he was 16 and had just released his first album, “Why.”<br/>Glier, 24, released his fifth album, “Things I Should Let You Know,” in January. The disc has won wide acclaim, with critics praising his memorable lyrics, supple, emotive voice and irresistible pop melodies. <br/>After hearing the verdict of the Trayvon Martin/George Zimmerman trial, Glier was recently moved to write a new song called “Dead in the Streets.” <br/>“Personally, the best way I know how to cope is by writing songs,” he wrote on his website. “ I decided to write this song from the perspective of George Zimmerman, my intention is one of healing and moving forward.”<br/>The video of Glier performing the song can be viewed at www.sethglier.com or at www.youtube.com<br/>Joining Glier for the Energy Park show will be local musician Joe Nerney on vocals, saxophone, piano and recorder. Nerney, 61, has been accompanying Glier on his tour in support of the new album. Despite their different musical backgrounds (Nerney has worked with rock cover bands and with John Sheldon’s Blue Streak) and the big age difference between the two, they have forged a strong musical partnership. So don’t miss out on what promises to be a special evening of music.<br/> For more information, or in the event of a weather cancellation, please call the Greenfield Recreation Department at 413-772-1553. $10 suggested donation at the gate.<br/>

    Seth Glier returns to perform at Greenfield Energy Park Sunday
    Singer-songwriter Seth Glier, a Shelburne Falls native, will take to The Station stage at the Energy Park on Miles Street in Greenfield on Sunday, Aug. 11, at 6 p.m. This show is the final show in the “Sundays in the Park” summer series. According to Glier, the last time he played the Energy Park he was 16 and had just released his first album, “Why.”
    Glier, 24, released his fifth album, “Things I Should Let You Know,” in January. The disc has won wide acclaim, with critics praising his memorable lyrics, supple, emotive voice and irresistible pop melodies.
    After hearing the verdict of the Trayvon Martin/George Zimmerman trial, Glier was recently moved to write a new song called “Dead in the Streets.”
    “Personally, the best way I know how to cope is by writing songs,” he wrote on his website. “ I decided to write this song from the perspective of George Zimmerman, my intention is one of healing and moving forward.”
    The video of Glier performing the song can be viewed at www.sethglier.com or at www.youtube.com
    Joining Glier for the Energy Park show will be local musician Joe Nerney on vocals, saxophone, piano and recorder. Nerney, 61, has been accompanying Glier on his tour in support of the new album. Despite their different musical backgrounds (Nerney has worked with rock cover bands and with John Sheldon’s Blue Streak) and the big age difference between the two, they have forged a strong musical partnership. So don’t miss out on what promises to be a special evening of music.
    For more information, or in the event of a weather cancellation, please call the Greenfield Recreation Department at 413-772-1553. $10 suggested donation at the gate.

  • SALMON FALLS ARTISANS SHOWROOM, 1 Ashfield St., Shelburne Falls, will host a reading by members of Pam Roberts writing groups “Spirit of the Written Word.” Saturday, 3 to 5 p.m.The groups are hosted by Cancer Connection in Northampton and by Forest Moon in Greenfield and Brattleboro, Vt. Reading will be followed by a healing ritual. “One in Eight: The Torso Project,” an exhibit of embellished plaster cast torsos made by area breast cancer survivors, female family members and friends, will be on display through April 29. See Exhibits, Page D2.<br/>

    SALMON FALLS ARTISANS SHOWROOM, 1 Ashfield St., Shelburne Falls, will host a reading by members of Pam Roberts writing groups “Spirit of the Written Word.” Saturday, 3 to 5 p.m.The groups are hosted by Cancer Connection in Northampton and by Forest Moon in Greenfield and Brattleboro, Vt. Reading will be followed by a healing ritual. “One in Eight: The Torso Project,” an exhibit of embellished plaster cast torsos made by area breast cancer survivors, female family members and friends, will be on display through April 29. See Exhibits, Page D2.

  • Recorder/Geoff Bluh<br/>FIRST GENERATION BENEFIT CONCERT 2013, featuring Charles Neville (pictured) of the Neville Brothers; Evelyn Harris, internationally acclaimed a capella singer, formerly of Sweet Honey in the Rock; Avery Sharpe, master bassist who has performed with McCoy Tyner and other jazz greats; Jo Sallins, internationally touring composer/musician based in Springfield; Tony Vacca, of World Rhythms Ensemble; Youssoupha Sidibe, internationally touring Senegalese Kora player; And, excerpts of work by the First Generation Theater Ensemble. 7 to 9 p.m. Academy of Music, Northampton. Saturday, 9 to 11 p.m., Meet the Artists Reception at R. Michelson Galleries, Northampton. The event will raise funds to bring more youth into the program and enable First Generation to share its lively, compelling and moving performances with audiences throughout the region and beyond, say organizers. $15 general seating; $50 tickets for select seating and to attend the Meet The Artists Reception. Academy of Music box office, Tuesday through Friday, 3 to 6 p.m. 413-584-9032 ext.105. Online tickets: http://academyofmusictheatre.tix.com. www.performanceproject.org, <br/>413-586-4960.<br/>

    Recorder/Geoff Bluh
    FIRST GENERATION BENEFIT CONCERT 2013, featuring Charles Neville (pictured) of the Neville Brothers; Evelyn Harris, internationally acclaimed a capella singer, formerly of Sweet Honey in the Rock; Avery Sharpe, master bassist who has performed with McCoy Tyner and other jazz greats; Jo Sallins, internationally touring composer/musician based in Springfield; Tony Vacca, of World Rhythms Ensemble; Youssoupha Sidibe, internationally touring Senegalese Kora player; And, excerpts of work by the First Generation Theater Ensemble. 7 to 9 p.m. Academy of Music, Northampton. Saturday, 9 to 11 p.m., Meet the Artists Reception at R. Michelson Galleries, Northampton. The event will raise funds to bring more youth into the program and enable First Generation to share its lively, compelling and moving performances with audiences throughout the region and beyond, say organizers. $15 general seating; $50 tickets for select seating and to attend the Meet The Artists Reception. Academy of Music box office, Tuesday through Friday, 3 to 6 p.m. 413-584-9032 ext.105. Online tickets: http://academyofmusictheatre.tix.com. www.performanceproject.org,
    413-586-4960.

  • File photos<br/>FIRST GENERATION BENEFIT CONCERT 2013, featuring Charles Neville of the Neville Brothers; Evelyn Harris (pictured) , internationally acclaimed a capella singer, formerly of Sweet Honey in the Rock; Avery Sharpe, master bassist who has performed with McCoy Tyner and other jazz greats; Jo Sallins, internationally touring composer/musician based in Springfield; Tony Vacca, of World Rhythms Ensemble; Youssoupha Sidibe, internationally touring Senegalese Kora player; And, excerpts of work by the First Generation Theater Ensemble. 7 to 9 p.m. Academy of Music, Northampton. Saturday, 9 to 11 p.m., Meet the Artists Reception at R. Michelson Galleries, Northampton. The event will raise funds to bring more youth into the program and enable First Generation to share its lively, compelling and moving performances with audiences throughout the region and beyond, say organizers. $15 general seating; $50 tickets for select seating and to attend the Meet The Artists Reception. Academy of Music box office, Tuesday through Friday, 3 to 6 p.m. 413-584-9032 ext.105. Online tickets: http://academyofmusictheatre.tix.com. www.performanceproject.org, <br/>413-586-4960.<br/>

    File photos
    FIRST GENERATION BENEFIT CONCERT 2013, featuring Charles Neville of the Neville Brothers; Evelyn Harris (pictured) , internationally acclaimed a capella singer, formerly of Sweet Honey in the Rock; Avery Sharpe, master bassist who has performed with McCoy Tyner and other jazz greats; Jo Sallins, internationally touring composer/musician based in Springfield; Tony Vacca, of World Rhythms Ensemble; Youssoupha Sidibe, internationally touring Senegalese Kora player; And, excerpts of work by the First Generation Theater Ensemble. 7 to 9 p.m. Academy of Music, Northampton. Saturday, 9 to 11 p.m., Meet the Artists Reception at R. Michelson Galleries, Northampton. The event will raise funds to bring more youth into the program and enable First Generation to share its lively, compelling and moving performances with audiences throughout the region and beyond, say organizers. $15 general seating; $50 tickets for select seating and to attend the Meet The Artists Reception. Academy of Music box office, Tuesday through Friday, 3 to 6 p.m. 413-584-9032 ext.105. Online tickets: http://academyofmusictheatre.tix.com. www.performanceproject.org,
    413-586-4960.

  • Feel the beat<br/>This week, in particular, is full of chances to experience both legendary jazz — Charles Neville — awesome  percussion — Tony Vacca (pictured) — and poet hip-hop brothers from Sengal, Africa — Bideew Bou Bess. Interested? Here are the events you should check out in the calendar: ∎ Friday: The Senegal-America Project with Bideew Bou Bess from Senegal, Impulse Ensemble (Derrik Jordan, Jim Matus and Vacca) and Neville at the The Vermont Jazz Center in Brattleboro, Vt.; <br/>■ Saturday:  Neville and his quartet will be at the Full Moon Coffeehouse in Wendell and Bideew Bou Bess will be at The Pushkin in Greenfield; ∎ Sunday: Neville and a host of other talent, including flutist Peter H. Bloom and The Lonesome Brothers, will play a benefit in Florence. See our “Music” listings.

    Feel the beat
    This week, in particular, is full of chances to experience both legendary jazz — Charles Neville — awesome percussion — Tony Vacca (pictured) — and poet hip-hop brothers from Sengal, Africa — Bideew Bou Bess. Interested? Here are the events you should check out in the calendar: ∎ Friday: The Senegal-America Project with Bideew Bou Bess from Senegal, Impulse Ensemble (Derrik Jordan, Jim Matus and Vacca) and Neville at the The Vermont Jazz Center in Brattleboro, Vt.;
    ■ Saturday: Neville and his quartet will be at the Full Moon Coffeehouse in Wendell and Bideew Bou Bess will be at The Pushkin in Greenfield; ∎ Sunday: Neville and a host of other talent, including flutist Peter H. Bloom and The Lonesome Brothers, will play a benefit in Florence. See our “Music” listings.

  • AN EVENING OF POETRY AND PROSE, Montague Bookmill, 440 Greenfield Road, Montague, Saturday, 6 to 8 p.m. Free. Kristin Bock (pictured), Jane Rosenberg LaForge , Michelle Valois. Bock’s “Cloisters” won the Tupelo First Book Award in 2009. Rosenberg LaForge is the author of “With Apologies to Mick Jagger, Other Gods, and All Women” (Aldrich, 2012) and the chapbooks “Half Life” (Big Table, 2010) and “After Voices” (Burning River, 2009). Valois has published essays, poems and stories in Tri-Quarterly, The Massachusetts Review, Brevity, Fourth Genre, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Verseand others. www.montaguebookmill.com.<br/>

    AN EVENING OF POETRY AND PROSE, Montague Bookmill, 440 Greenfield Road, Montague, Saturday, 6 to 8 p.m. Free. Kristin Bock (pictured), Jane Rosenberg LaForge , Michelle Valois. Bock’s “Cloisters” won the Tupelo First Book Award in 2009. Rosenberg LaForge is the author of “With Apologies to Mick Jagger, Other Gods, and All Women” (Aldrich, 2012) and the chapbooks “Half Life” (Big Table, 2010) and “After Voices” (Burning River, 2009). Valois has published essays, poems and stories in Tri-Quarterly, The Massachusetts Review, Brevity, Fourth Genre, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Verseand others. www.montaguebookmill.com.

  • GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: “As You Write It” writers read during their encore debut of “As You Write It A Franklin County Anthology Volume III. Saturday, 11 a.m. Local writers Rosalie Bolton, Estelle Cade, Patricia Carlisle, Lillian Fiske, Frances Hemond, Dorothy Hmieleski, Robon Panagakos and Joseph A. Parzych will read new tales of growing up and living life large before cell phones, computers, laptops or wireless, as well as going on trips to Australia, working as a nurse, joyriding at age 15, war games, finding the perfect bridal gown and other surprises. <br/>

    GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: “As You Write It” writers read during their encore debut of “As You Write It A Franklin County Anthology Volume III. Saturday, 11 a.m. Local writers Rosalie Bolton, Estelle Cade, Patricia Carlisle, Lillian Fiske, Frances Hemond, Dorothy Hmieleski, Robon Panagakos and Joseph A. Parzych will read new tales of growing up and living life large before cell phones, computers, laptops or wireless, as well as going on trips to Australia, working as a nurse, joyriding at age 15, war games, finding the perfect bridal gown and other surprises.

  • Jeffrey Foucault

    Jeffrey Foucault

  • VOICE RECITAL with works by Copland, Debussy and more. Performed by Shelley A. Roberts (pictured), soprano and Brandon Milardo, baritone. Accompanied by Scott Bailey. Saturday, 2 p.m. Trinity Church, 17 Severance St., Shelburne Falls. Free. shelleyrobertssoprano@gmail.com. Roberts, soprano, has recently been seen performing the role of Bagatelle in Offenbach’s “Bagatelle” and the role of Catherine in Offenbach’s “Le Mariage aux Lanterns” in Perigueux, France.  Last dpring, she was the soprano soloist for Westfield State University Choral’s performance of Mozart’s Mass in C and Regina Coeli. In 2011, she performed the role of Despina in Mozart’s Cosi fan tutte. Milardo, baritone, is an emerging artist from the Boston area. Recent performances include the title role in Cape Cod Opera’s outreach production of “Don Giovanni,” Marcello in “La bohème” with Boston Opera Collaborative, and Count Almaviva in “Le nozze di Figaro with Longy Opera.”

    VOICE RECITAL with works by Copland, Debussy and more. Performed by Shelley A. Roberts (pictured), soprano and Brandon Milardo, baritone. Accompanied by Scott Bailey. Saturday, 2 p.m. Trinity Church, 17 Severance St., Shelburne Falls. Free. shelleyrobertssoprano@gmail.com. Roberts, soprano, has recently been seen performing the role of Bagatelle in Offenbach’s “Bagatelle” and the role of Catherine in Offenbach’s “Le Mariage aux Lanterns” in Perigueux, France. Last dpring, she was the soprano soloist for Westfield State University Choral’s performance of Mozart’s Mass in C and Regina Coeli. In 2011, she performed the role of Despina in Mozart’s Cosi fan tutte. Milardo, baritone, is an emerging artist from the Boston area. Recent performances include the title role in Cape Cod Opera’s outreach production of “Don Giovanni,” Marcello in “La bohème” with Boston Opera Collaborative, and Count Almaviva in “Le nozze di Figaro with Longy Opera.”

  • Submitted photo<br/>Muppets come to Pothole Pictures Friday, Saturday<br/>Pothole Pictures is wrapping up its current season Friday and Saturday by screening “The Muppet Movie,” which first charmed audiences in 1979. Organizers say, “The first big- screen vehicle for Jim Henson’s lovable characters, ‘The Muppet Movie’ charts Kermit’s odyssey from a Georgia swamp to Hollywood fame and features a love-struck Miss Piggy, a Fozzie Bear with no sense of direction, cameos from just about every big name actor of the 1970s and the unforgettable opening musical number ‘The Rainbow Connection.’” We don’t know about you folks, but we could use a few frolicking muppets right about now. See  “Films” for more details.
  • HISTORIC DEERFIELD, 80 Old Main St., Deerfield. www.historic-deerfield.org, 413-775-7127. ∎ “Three Bags Full: All About Wool.” History Workshop. April 18 through 21, April 27 and 28. Every Saturday and Sunday, May 4 through June 30. Noon to 4:30 p.m. Drop in any time. From Colonial times to the present, spring has been the season for shearing sheep. Following shearing there is always plenty of wool to be processed and eventually made into clothing, blankets, and other warm necessities for the home. The first step in this process is washing the wool, followed by: picking, carding, spinning and dyeing. Visitors can participate in many of these steps and make a project to take home. Then, with wool in hand, families will be encouraged to follow the wool trail to the Sheldon House and the Apprentices’ Workshop to learn more about the role of wool in early New England Homes. Included with general admission: $12 adults, $5 youth (ages 6-17), free for children under 6 and members. ∎ “Cartographic Encounters: Exploring the Nature of Early Maps,” a new course on antique maps continues. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Bartels Seminar Room of the Flynt Center of Early New England Life at Historic Deerfield in Deerfield. The theme of today’s course will be “Early Maps and Visual Culture.” Antique maps provide a fascinating window on the progression of geographical knowledge, and at the same time reveal contemporary views of the world. Representing a convergence of history, geography, and art, antiquarian maps are desirable to both researchers and collectors. Instructor David Bosse, Historic Deerfield’s Librarian and Curator of Maps, has worked in the map collection of the Newberry Library (Chicago) and the Clements Library, University of Michigan. www.historic-deerfield.org. Final course April 25. <br/>
  • Seth Glier returns to perform at  Greenfield Energy Park Sunday<br/>Singer-songwriter Seth Glier, a Shelburne Falls native, will take to The Station stage at the Energy Park on Miles Street in Greenfield on Sunday, Aug. 11, at 6 p.m. This show is the final show in the “Sundays in the Park” summer series. According to Glier, the last time he played the Energy Park he was 16 and had just released his first album, “Why.”<br/>Glier, 24, released his fifth album, “Things I Should Let You Know,” in January. The disc has won wide acclaim, with critics praising his memorable lyrics, supple, emotive voice and irresistible pop melodies. <br/>After hearing the verdict of the Trayvon Martin/George Zimmerman trial, Glier was recently moved to write a new song called “Dead in the Streets.” <br/>“Personally, the best way I know how to cope is by writing songs,” he wrote on his website. “ I decided to write this song from the perspective of George Zimmerman, my intention is one of healing and moving forward.”<br/>The video of Glier performing the song can be viewed at www.sethglier.com or at www.youtube.com<br/>Joining Glier for the Energy Park show will be local musician Joe Nerney on vocals, saxophone, piano and recorder. Nerney, 61, has been accompanying Glier on his tour in support of the new album. Despite their different musical backgrounds (Nerney has worked with rock cover bands and with John Sheldon’s Blue Streak) and the big age difference between the two, they have forged a strong musical partnership. So don’t miss out on what promises to be a special evening of music.<br/> For more information, or in the event of a weather cancellation, please call the Greenfield Recreation Department at 413-772-1553. $10 suggested donation at the gate.<br/>
  • SALMON FALLS ARTISANS SHOWROOM, 1 Ashfield St., Shelburne Falls, will host a reading by members of Pam Roberts writing groups “Spirit of the Written Word.” Saturday, 3 to 5 p.m.The groups are hosted by Cancer Connection in Northampton and by Forest Moon in Greenfield and Brattleboro, Vt. Reading will be followed by a healing ritual. “One in Eight: The Torso Project,” an exhibit of embellished plaster cast torsos made by area breast cancer survivors, female family members and friends, will be on display through April 29. See Exhibits, Page D2.<br/>
  • Recorder/Geoff Bluh<br/>FIRST GENERATION BENEFIT CONCERT 2013, featuring Charles Neville (pictured) of the Neville Brothers; Evelyn Harris, internationally acclaimed a capella singer, formerly of Sweet Honey in the Rock; Avery Sharpe, master bassist who has performed with McCoy Tyner and other jazz greats; Jo Sallins, internationally touring composer/musician based in Springfield; Tony Vacca, of World Rhythms Ensemble; Youssoupha Sidibe, internationally touring Senegalese Kora player; And, excerpts of work by the First Generation Theater Ensemble. 7 to 9 p.m. Academy of Music, Northampton. Saturday, 9 to 11 p.m., Meet the Artists Reception at R. Michelson Galleries, Northampton. The event will raise funds to bring more youth into the program and enable First Generation to share its lively, compelling and moving performances with audiences throughout the region and beyond, say organizers. $15 general seating; $50 tickets for select seating and to attend the Meet The Artists Reception. Academy of Music box office, Tuesday through Friday, 3 to 6 p.m. 413-584-9032 ext.105. Online tickets: http://academyofmusictheatre.tix.com. www.performanceproject.org, <br/>413-586-4960.<br/>
  • File photos<br/>FIRST GENERATION BENEFIT CONCERT 2013, featuring Charles Neville of the Neville Brothers; Evelyn Harris (pictured) , internationally acclaimed a capella singer, formerly of Sweet Honey in the Rock; Avery Sharpe, master bassist who has performed with McCoy Tyner and other jazz greats; Jo Sallins, internationally touring composer/musician based in Springfield; Tony Vacca, of World Rhythms Ensemble; Youssoupha Sidibe, internationally touring Senegalese Kora player; And, excerpts of work by the First Generation Theater Ensemble. 7 to 9 p.m. Academy of Music, Northampton. Saturday, 9 to 11 p.m., Meet the Artists Reception at R. Michelson Galleries, Northampton. The event will raise funds to bring more youth into the program and enable First Generation to share its lively, compelling and moving performances with audiences throughout the region and beyond, say organizers. $15 general seating; $50 tickets for select seating and to attend the Meet The Artists Reception. Academy of Music box office, Tuesday through Friday, 3 to 6 p.m. 413-584-9032 ext.105. Online tickets: http://academyofmusictheatre.tix.com. www.performanceproject.org, <br/>413-586-4960.<br/>
  • Feel the beat<br/>This week, in particular, is full of chances to experience both legendary jazz — Charles Neville — awesome  percussion — Tony Vacca (pictured) — and poet hip-hop brothers from Sengal, Africa — Bideew Bou Bess. Interested? Here are the events you should check out in the calendar: ∎ Friday: The Senegal-America Project with Bideew Bou Bess from Senegal, Impulse Ensemble (Derrik Jordan, Jim Matus and Vacca) and Neville at the The Vermont Jazz Center in Brattleboro, Vt.; <br/>■ Saturday:  Neville and his quartet will be at the Full Moon Coffeehouse in Wendell and Bideew Bou Bess will be at The Pushkin in Greenfield; ∎ Sunday: Neville and a host of other talent, including flutist Peter H. Bloom and The Lonesome Brothers, will play a benefit in Florence. See our “Music” listings.
  • AN EVENING OF POETRY AND PROSE, Montague Bookmill, 440 Greenfield Road, Montague, Saturday, 6 to 8 p.m. Free. Kristin Bock (pictured), Jane Rosenberg LaForge , Michelle Valois. Bock’s “Cloisters” won the Tupelo First Book Award in 2009. Rosenberg LaForge is the author of “With Apologies to Mick Jagger, Other Gods, and All Women” (Aldrich, 2012) and the chapbooks “Half Life” (Big Table, 2010) and “After Voices” (Burning River, 2009). Valois has published essays, poems and stories in Tri-Quarterly, The Massachusetts Review, Brevity, Fourth Genre, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Verseand others. www.montaguebookmill.com.<br/>
  • GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: “As You Write It” writers read during their encore debut of “As You Write It A Franklin County Anthology Volume III. Saturday, 11 a.m. Local writers Rosalie Bolton, Estelle Cade, Patricia Carlisle, Lillian Fiske, Frances Hemond, Dorothy Hmieleski, Robon Panagakos and Joseph A. Parzych will read new tales of growing up and living life large before cell phones, computers, laptops or wireless, as well as going on trips to Australia, working as a nurse, joyriding at age 15, war games, finding the perfect bridal gown and other surprises. <br/>
  • Jeffrey Foucault
  • VOICE RECITAL with works by Copland, Debussy and more. Performed by Shelley A. Roberts (pictured), soprano and Brandon Milardo, baritone. Accompanied by Scott Bailey. Saturday, 2 p.m. Trinity Church, 17 Severance St., Shelburne Falls. Free. shelleyrobertssoprano@gmail.com. Roberts, soprano, has recently been seen performing the role of Bagatelle in Offenbach’s “Bagatelle” and the role of Catherine in Offenbach’s “Le Mariage aux Lanterns” in Perigueux, France.  Last dpring, she was the soprano soloist for Westfield State University Choral’s performance of Mozart’s Mass in C and Regina Coeli. In 2011, she performed the role of Despina in Mozart’s Cosi fan tutte. Milardo, baritone, is an emerging artist from the Boston area. Recent performances include the title role in Cape Cod Opera’s outreach production of “Don Giovanni,” Marcello in “La bohème” with Boston Opera Collaborative, and Count Almaviva in “Le nozze di Figaro with Longy Opera.”

Thursday 18

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Open Mic Night hosted by Dan, Kip and Schultzy from Curly Fingers Dupree from 8:30 to 11:30 p.m. No cover. 413-863-2882.

DEJA BREW, 57A Lockes Village Road, Wendell: Tommy Filiault & Friends. Acoustic rock. 8:30 to 11 p.m. http://dejabrewpub.com/

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Half Shaved Jazz. 8 p.m. Free. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Red Sox vs. Cleveland at 7 p.m. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. DJ Let’s Dance Entertainment in the Sports Bar. Thirsty Thursdays and college night hosted by Big Dan in the Sports Bar. Beer Pong Tournament. Wear your college shirt or show your college ID to be entered in end-of-the-night prizes. 773-8313.

Coffeehouses

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: Poetry reading, 7 p.m. Trish Crapo, Margaret Lloyd, Henry Lyman, Rich Michelson will read from “Open Field,” poems from Group 18. Free. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Films

PIONEER VALLEY JEWISH FILM FESTIVAL, a two-week celebration of the best in Jewish cinema from around the world concludes today.
∎ ”Kaddish for a Friend.” 4 and 7:30 p.m. Amherst College, Stirn Audtiorium, Mead Art Museum, Amherst. Free. Surprising coming-of-age story inspired by real events. When 14-year-old Ali escapes a Lebanese refugee camp with his family and lands in public housing in Berlin, he tries to impress his Arab friends by vandalizing the apartment of his elderly Russian Jewish neighbor. ∎ “Paris-Manhattan.” 7:30 p.m. (6:30 p.m. pre-film nosh) Garden Cinema, Greenfield. Under constant pressure to marry from her increasingly anxious Jewish parents, Alice fills prescriptions alongside her father at their family-owned pharmacy. Rather than dating, she seeks refuge in the world of Woody Allen, engaging in imaginary conversations and surrounding herself with images of the iconic filmmaker. Tickets for some events are only available through theater box offices. Most films are $9; students/senior price $7. For details: www.pvjff.org.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Knitting Circle at the Greenfield Public Library, 10 a.m. Bring your project to the LeVanway Meeting Room and join with other knitters to talk about knitting, crafts, and books. Free. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. the library’s meeting room will be open each Monday through Friday for a Writer’s Lunch. This is a self-directed free writing time open to any writer who is looking for a place to work through lunch. Bring your own lunch and beverage. Contact Jane Buchanan at
772-1544 for more details.

CARNEGIE LIBRARY, Avenue A, Turners Falls: All April vacation week there will be Art-to-Go kids available in the children’s room.

Music

ARTS BLOCK, 289 Main St., Greenfield. Third Thursday Ted’s Trio Jazz with Ted Wirt, 7 p.m. theartsblock.com

MARINA RESTAURANT, Route 5, Brattleboro, Vt. Kevin Parry hosts open mic every Thursday from 7 to 10 p.m. To sign up for a 20 minute slot, call 802-257-7563. For more information, visit www.kevinparrymusic.com.

RYAN HOMMEL CD RELEASE SHOW at the Parlor Room at Signature Sounds, 32 Masonic St., Northampton. 7 p.m. $10. 665-4036, www.parlorroommusic.com. “My allegiance is to the song, and that’s the most liberating and challenging part of what I do,” says Hommel.

THE 3RD STRING TRIO will perform at Esselon Cafe, 99 Russell St., Hadley. 6 to 8 p.m. Old World cafe music. Repertoire includes Musettes of France, Tangos from Argentina, Waltzes of Central and South America, Folk Songs of Italy and Country Dances of the British Isles. No cover.

Potpourri

DISNEY ON ICE presents “Worlds of Fantasy” with dazzling skating, special effects and beloved characters. MassMutual Center, Springfield. Today at 7 p.m. Continues Friday at 2 and 7 p.m.; Saturday, 11 a.m., 3 and 7 p.m., and Sunday, 3 p.m. Tickets $25, $40, $60. Children ages 2 to 12, $15. 800-745-3000, ticketmaster.com.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD, 80 Old Main St., Deerfield. www.historic-deerfield.org, 413-775-7127. ∎ “Three Bags Full: All About Wool.” History Workshop. April 18 through 21, April 27 and 28. Every Saturday and Sunday, May 4 through June 30. Noon to 4:30 p.m. Drop in any time. From Colonial times to the present, spring has been the season for shearing sheep. Following shearing there is always plenty of wool to be processed and eventually made into clothing, blankets, and other warm necessities for the home. The first step in this process is washing the wool, followed by: picking, carding, spinning and dyeing. Visitors can participate in many of these steps and make a project to take home. Then, with wool in hand, families will be encouraged to follow the wool trail to the Sheldon House and the Apprentices’ Workshop to learn more about the role of wool in early New England Homes. Included with general admission: $12 adults, $5 youth (ages 6-17), free for children under 6 and members. ∎ “Cartographic Encounters: Exploring the Nature of Early Maps,” a new course on antique maps continues. 7 to 8:30 p.m. Bartels Seminar Room of the Flynt Center of Early New England Life at Historic Deerfield in Deerfield. The theme of today’s course will be “Early Maps and Visual Culture.” Antique maps provide a fascinating window on the progression of geographical knowledge, and at the same time reveal contemporary views of the world. Representing a convergence of history, geography, and art, antiquarian maps are desirable to both researchers and collectors. Instructor David Bosse, Historic Deerfield’s Librarian and Curator of Maps, has worked in the map collection of the Newberry Library (Chicago) and the Clements Library, University of Michigan. www.historic-deerfield.org. Final course April 25.

“MUSIC & MOVEMENT at Montague Center Library, Montague Center. With Tom Carroll and Laurie Davidson.
10 a.m. Young children of all ages and their parents or caregivers invited to the free program. Thursdays through June.

Friday 19

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Check out new and exciting raffles on Fridays from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday Night Karaoke hosted by Dirty Johnny from 9 p.m. to midnight plus games on 14 HDTVs. No cover. 413-863-2882.

EXTRA POINT NIGHTCLUB (located next to Between The Uprights), 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Top 40, dance and hip-hop music spun by DJ Drew from 10 p.m. until 1 a.m. No cover. 413-863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: ∎ 7 p.m. Rory Block. $17.50, $20. ∎ 10 p.m. Fiesta Brava. The Brass opens. $8, $10. ww.iheg.com.

DEJA BREW, 57A Lockes Village Road, Wendell: Josh Levangie and The Mud, Blood & Beer Band. Singing Johnny Cash favorites and more. 9 to 11:30 p.m. 978-544-2739, www.dejabrewpub.com.

LISTON’S BAR & GRILL, 324 Old North Road, Worthington: Ray Mason Band. 9 p.m. to midnight. No cover. 238-5353.

THE MONTAGUE INN, 485 Federal St., Route 63, Montague: Dance the night away with TrainWreck 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. $5 cover 830-1230. Information also available on Facebook and http://themontagueinn.com.

PEARL STREET BALLROOM, 10 Pearl St., Northampton: 9 p.m. Kung Fu. Dr. Reputation opens. $12.50, $15. www.iheg.com.

PEARL STREET CLUBROOM, 10 Pearl St., Northampton: 8:30 p.m. The Dead Milkmen. $20, $25. www.iheg.com.

ROUTE 63 ROADHOUSE, 32 Federal St., Millers Falls. Community Smokes. Reggae rock. 9:30 p.m. 413-659 3384.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, Main Street, Greenfield: Bruins vs. Pittsburgh at 7 p.m. Friday night madness with Big Dan in the sports bar. Bud Light Night. Prizes and giveaways. Watch 11 50 inch HDTVs. 773-8313.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Haste. Gypsy. 9:30 p.m. Free. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

Coffeehouses

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: 7:30 p.m. Jim Gilmour with special guest Amanda Rogers. Free; please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Dance

AMHERST INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: Every Friday night, 7:30 to 10 p.m. Bangs Community Center, Boltwood Walk, Amherst Center. Dances from the Balkans, Middle Eastern Europe, more. You need not bring a partner. Live music first Fridays of the month. Some teaching. Beginners welcome. Donation. 549-6748. www.amherstfolkdancing.org.

Films

POTHOLE PICTURES, 51 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: “The Muppet Movie,” a simple tale of a simple frog on his way to Hollywood to make it big. 7:30 p.m. Music at 7 p.m. by Whistlestop, old-time music. $6, $4. Repeats Saturday at 7:30 p.m., with music at 7 p.m. by Beach Honey, pop. 625-2896. $6 for adults and $4 for kids under 12. Pre-purchased season tickets are also accepted.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Mother Goose on the Loose. 11 a.m. Join the happy circle with Kay Lyons at a lap-sit story hour for children age 3 and under. Rhymes, songs and movement games make up this story time style popularized by author Betsy Diamand-Cohen. ∎ Writers’ Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. Self-directed. The meeting room will be open Tuesdays through Fridays for any writer who is looking for a place to work through their lunch. Bring your own lunch and beverage and stop in for all or part of the Writers’ Lunch. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details. ∎ Open for Business. 2 p.m. Telecommuters and local business people looking for reliable WiFi and a quiet workspace are invited to the library’s LeVanway Meeting room Mondays and Fridays from 2 to 5 p.m. Access to the room is free and open to all who need a space to work.

Music

ARTS BLOCK, 289 Main St., Greenfield. Michael Chorney and Hollar General, plus Wooden Dinosaur. 8 p.m. Promoters promise “An Amazing Amalgam of Awesome Americana.” $7 in advance online, $10 at the door. theartsblock.com.

BEN SOLEE, cellist, in concert. 7 and 9 p.m. The Parlor Room at Signature Sounds, 32 Masonic St., Northampton. $18. 665-4036, www.parlorroommusic.com. We’re told “Sollee first gained major notice with his 2008 debut, ‘Learning to Bend,’ which led NPR’s ‘Morning Edition’ to call him one of the Top Ten Great Unknown Artists of the year. Later, ‘All Things Considered’ called his debut ‘an inspired collection of acoustic, folk and jazz-flavored songs, filled with hope and the earnest belief that the world is good.’”

GOLDSTEIN-PELED-FITERSTEIN TRIO in concert. 7:30 p.m. Centre Congregational Church in Brattleboro, Vt. 7:30 p.m. Tickets $10, $20, $30 802-257-4523, bmcvt.org.

OPEN MUSIC COLLECTIVE, California trombonist and composer Michael Vlatkovitch makes a rare New England appearance. The magazine, “JAZZIZ” has called Vlatkovich, “one of the most extraordinary improvising trombonists in this country as well as overseas. ” Joining him will be saxophonist Jason Robinson, drummer and percussionist Bob Weiner and bassist Jamie MacDonald. 8 p.m. $10 general admission and is held in handicapped accessible Suite 335 in the Cotton Mill, Brattleboro Vt. 802-254-5054 or email info@openmusiccollective.org

SETH GLIER, singer-songwriter, pianist, guitarist, and Liz Longley, singer-songwriter, in concert. Twin bill of award-winning contemporary folk singer-songwriters. 7:30 p.m. Hooker-Dunham Theater & Gallery, 139 Main St., Brattleboro, Vt. $18 general, $16 students and seniors. For reservations and information, call 802-254-9276. www.hookerdunham.org.

UMASS SYMPHONY BAND and Percussion Ensemble concert. 8 p.m. Fine Arts Center Concert Hall, UMass, Amherst. Performances by the UMass-Amherst Department of Music & Dance, Symphony Band and Percussion Ensemble members. Tickets $3 for UMass students; $5 other students, seniors, children under 18, $10 general public. Tickets: 545-2511, fac.umass.edu/musicanddance.

Potpourri

DISNEY ON ICE continues. See Thursday’s listing.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD, “Three Bags Full: All About Wool” History Workshop continues, see Thursday’s listing.

NEW ENGLAND YOUTH THEATRE presents A Gala Evening of Comedie Italienne & Cuisine Francaise. 6 p.m. New England Youth Theatre, 100 Flat St., Brattleboro, Vt. French cuisine from local chefs, an assortment of fine wine, music performed by Deniz Cordell at 6 p.m. Followed by a NEYT senior company performance of “Scapin,” written by France’s king of comedy Moliere. French pastries and chocolate truffles at intermission. $60. All proceeds go directly to benefit students of NEYT. www.neyt.org.

RESTORATIVE YOGA at Community Yoga and Wellness Center, 16 Federal St., 2nd floor, Greenfield. 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. DeDe Boyd and Barbara Polowy will guide students in active relaxation using simple yoga props to support the body in a series of back bends, twists and inverted postures to cultivate profound rest and deep relaxation. All levels welcome. $15. To register call 774-4700 or email info@community-yoga.com, www.community-yoga.com.

Theater

“ALMOST, MAINE” presented by Greenfield Community College. 8 p.m. Repeats Saturday 2 and 8 p.m. Join 19 characters of the fictional town, Almost, Maine, in their hazardous search and understanding of love. $5 suggested donation. For more information: web.gcc.mass.edu/theater/.

“JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR” presented by Arena Civic Theatre. 8 p.m. The Shea Theater, Avenue A, Turners Falls. Continues Saturday, April 26 and 27 at 8 p.m., and April 28 at 2 p.m. A discussion panel will follow the April 26 performance with a variety of spiritual leaders to discuss the role of religion in today’s culture. This was the first professional musical by Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice, originally opening on Broadway in 1971. $17 general admission, $13 seniors and students, $10 children under 12. Tickets available at World Eye Bookshop in Greenfield, Jones library in Amhrest, or at the door. For reservations, call 863-2281 Ext. 2 or visit www.arenacivictheatre.org. See our cover story, Page D1.

Saturday 20

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, Turners Falls: Catch all your favorite games on 14 HDTVs. 413-863-2882

THE CUE BAR, 747 Putney Road, Brattleboro, Vt., DJ Tom Mayo, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. No cover. Free pool tables all night. Menu until midnight. Every Saturday, 802-579-1785.

DEJA BREW, 57A Lockes Village Road, Wendell: Dedicated to Delilah. 80s pop rock ballads. 9 to 11:30 p.m. http://dejabrewpub.com/

EXTRA POINT NIGHTCLUB (located next to Between The Uprights), 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Live music with Jimmy Must Quit. 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. $5 cover includes chance to win two tickets to comedian Bob Marley show in Keene, N.H. 413-863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: ∎ 7 p.m. Poor Old Shine. The Ephemeral Stringband opens. $12.50, $15.
∎ 10 p.m. Fear Nuttin Band. The Raft opens. $10, $13. www.iheg.com.

THE MONTAGUE INN, 485 Federal St. (Route 63), Montague: Dance Party Karaoke with DJ Dr. Dudley, 8:30 p.m. to 12:30 a.m. 830-1230. http://themontagueinn.com.

PEARL STREET BALLROOM, 10 Pearl St., Northampton: Dopapod. $12.50, $15. 9 p.m. www.iheg.com.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Rockit Queer with DJ Funkadelic Fern. 9:30 p.m. $3. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

ROUTE 63 ROADHOUSE, 32 Federal St., Millers Falls. Rock 201. Classic rock. 9:30 a.m. 413-659 3384.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield: Red Sox vs. Kansas City at 7 p.m. DJ Let’s Dance Entertainment in the Sports Bar & Disco hosted by Meghan. Saturday night madness with Kathy and Tyler downstairs in Taylor’s Tavern. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. 773-8313.

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls. The Chickenyard with guest Hanging Hills. 7:30 p.m. The Chickenyard released “JuneBug” in October 2011 and has been performing in various venues throughout New England. Hanging Hills is an indie-rock group. Free. Please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Films

POTHOLE PICTURES “The Muppet Movie” concludes. See Friday’s listing.

Literary

AN EVENING OF POETRY AND PROSE, Montague Bookmill, 440 Greenfield Road, Montague, 6 to 8 p.m. Free. Kristin Bock, Jane Rosenberg LaForge , Michelle Valois. Bock’s “Cloisters” won the Tupelo First Book Award in 2009. Rosenberg LaForge is the author of “With Apologies to Mick Jagger, Other Gods, and All Women” (Aldrich, 2012) and the chapbooks “Half Life” (Big Table, 2010) and “After Voices” (Burning River, 2009). Valois has published essays, poems and stories in Tri-Quarterly, The Massachusetts Review, Brevity, Fourth Genre, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Verseand others. www.montaguebookmill.com.

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: “As You Write It” writers read during their encore debut of “As You Write It A Franklin County Anthology Volume III. Local writers Rosalie Bolton, Estelle Cade, Patricia Carlisle, Lillian Fiske, Frances Hemond, Dorothy Hmieleski, Robon Panagakos and Joseph A. Parzych will read new tales of growing up and living life large before cell phones, computers, laptops or wireless, as well as going on trips to Australia, working as a nurse, joyriding at age 15, war games, finding the perfect bridal gown and other surprises.

SALMON FALLS ARTISANS SHOWROOM, 1 Ashfield St., Shelburne Falls, will host a reading by members of Pam Roberts writing groups “Spirit of the Written Word.” The groups are hosted by Cancer Connection in Northampton and by Forest Moon in Greenfield and Brattleboro, Vt. Reading will be followed by a healing ritual. “One in Eight: The Torso Project,” an exhibit of embellished plaster cast torsos made by area breast cancer survivors, female family members and friends, will be on display through April 29. See Exhibits, Page D2.

WORLD EYE BOOKSHOP, Main Street, Greenfield. 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Marguerite Morris Willis will be signing her second book, “A Grandmother’s Essays on Education.”

Music

ARTS BLOCK, 289 Main St., Greenfield. Juke Joint Jazz with the Joe Belmont Jazz Guitar Trio. Promoters promise “original, hard-driving arrangements of the classic jazz repertoire.” 8 p.m. $7 in advance online, $10 at the door. theartsblock.com.

BETTYE LAVETTE, Grammy-nominated soul singer, will be in concert at Bellows Falls Opera House, Bellows Falls, Vt. 7:30 p.m. For tickets call 802-748-2600 or kingdomcounty.org.

CALVIN THEATER, 19 King St., Northampton: 8 p.m. An Evening with Bruce Hornsby. $38.50, $48.50. www.iheg.com.

CHRISTINE OHLMAN, “The Beehive Queen” in concert.
7:30 p.m. Next Stage Arts, Project, 15 Kimball Hill, Putney, Vt. Tickets This queen of blue-eyed rock and soul grew up loving equally the sweetness of a Memphis horn line and the raunch of an electric guitar riff. $15 general admission, $14 students/seniors, $18 at the door. 802-387-0102, www.nextstagearts.org, nextstagearts@gmail.com.

FIRST GENERATION BENEFIT CONCERT 2013, featuring Charles Neville of the Neville Brothers; Evelyn Harris, internationally acclaimed a capella singer, formerly of Sweet Honey in the Rock; Avery Sharpe, master bassist who has performed with McCoy Tyner and other jazz greats; Jo Sallins, internationally touring composer/musician based in Springfield; Tony Vacca, of World Rhythms Ensemble; Youssoupha Sidibe, internationally touring Senegalese Kora player; And, excerpts of work by the First Generation Theater Ensemble. 7 to 9 p.m. Academy of Music, Northampton. 9 to 11 p.m., Meet the Artists Reception at R. Michelson Galleries, Northampton. The event will raise funds to bring more youth into the program and enable First Generation to share its lively, compelling and moving performances with audiences throughout the region and beyond, say organizers. $15 general seating; $50 tickets for select seating and to attend the Meet The Artists Reception. Academy of Music box office, Tuesday through Friday, 3 to 6 p.m. 413-584-9032 ext.105. Online tickets: http://academyofmusictheatre.tix.com. www.performanceproject.org,
413-586-4960.

FOR VOICES ONLY: UMass Chamber Choir concert. 8 p.m. Newman Center Chapel, UMass-Amherst. A cappella works by Brahms, Whitacre, di Lasso, Palestrina, Finzi, Bruckner and arrangements of spirituals by Moses Hogan, Warren Martin and Shaw-Parker. Free. Donations accepted to assist in fundraising for the chamber choir tour to Munich, Salzburg, Vienna and Prague in May.

JEFFREY FOUCAULT AND COLD SATELLITE in concert. 7 and 9 p.m. The Parlor Room at Signature Sounds, 32 Masonic St., Northampton. $15. 665-4036, www.parlorroommusic. Promoters tell us, “Cold Satellite pairs Lisa Olstein’s visceral and imagistic language with Jeffrey Foucault’s lyrical sensibility and the rawboned authority of a rock band to create a stripped down ethos that hearkens back to records by Crazy Horse and the Faces, Led Zeppelin and the Stones.”

VOICE RECITAL with works by Copland, Debussy and more. Performed by Shelley A. Roberts, soprano and Brandon Milardo, baritone. Accompanied by Scott Bailey. 2 p.m. Trinity Church, 17 Severance St., Shelburne Falls. Free. shelleyrobertssoprano@gmail.com. Roberts, soprano, has recently been seen performing the role of Bagatelle in Offenbach’s “Bagatelle” and the role of Catherine in Offenbach’s “Le Mariage aux Lanterns” in Perigueux, France. Last dpring, she was the soprano soloist for Westfield State University Choral’s performance of Mozart’s Mass in C and Regina Coeli. In 2011, she performed the role of Despina in Mozart’s Cosi fan tutte. Milardo, baritone, is an emerging artist from the Boston area. Recent performances include the title role in Cape Cod Opera’s outreach production of “Don Giovanni,” Marcello in “La bohème” with Boston Opera Collaborative, and Count Almaviva in “Le nozze di Figaro with Longy Opera.”

Potpourri

DISNEY ON ICE continues. See Thursday’s listing.

EARTH DAY CLEANUP IN WHATELY: In conjunction with Earth Day, Arcadia Wildlife Sanctuary is participating in a clean-up in Whately. 9 a.m. to noon. Meet in Whately Center to assist in the cleanup. Wear work clothes and bring water. The program, is suitable for individuals and families with children ages 5 to 16. For information, contact Mass. Audubon’s Connecticut River Valley Sanctuaries at 584-3009 Ext. 812 or arcadia@massaudubon.org.

FRANKLIN COUNTY SPRING PARADE begins at 1 p.m. at Montague Elementary School, Sheffield, on Crocker Avenue. It will take a left onto Montague Street, travel to the end and turn left onto Turnpike Road, past the Turners Falls High School, left onto Millers Falls Road. At Scotty’s Convenience Store, the parade will turn left onto High Street and end back at Sheffield. The parade will include Montague Soapbox Derby participants.

HADLEY NATURALIST Nancy Goodman will lead a walk on Mount Norwottock. Participants will meet at the Notch Visitor Center off Route 116 in Amherst at 10 a.m. The hike will last about five hours. $5. Free for Pioneer Valley Institute members and children under 12.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD, “Three Bags Full: All About Wool” History Workshop continues, see Thursday’s listing.

LITTLE E, Saturday and Sunday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Franklin County Fairgrounds, Greenfield. Combines three events: Franklin County Home Show, the Green Fair and Farm to Fiber (previously known as FiberTwist). Exhibitors will be included in such categories as home improvement, leisure activities, and new environmental products. There will be home, yard and garden and fiber workshops on everything from 2013 Solar Energy Options to raising chickens in your backyard. For more information, http://thelittlee.org.

POSTCARD SHOW at First Congregational Church, 40 Silver St., Greenfield. 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Featuring 15 dealers of old picture postcards from five states. Local town views and many other subjects. Pizza and light refreshments offered. Benefit for the Historical Society. $3 admission.

Theater

“ALMOST, MAINE” concludes. See Friday’s listing.

“JESUS CHRIST SUPERSTAR” continues. See Friday’s listing.

“TRIAL BY JURY” presented at New England Youth Theater, 100 Flat St., Brattleboro, Vt. See Thursday’s listing.

Sunday 21

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. NASCAR, PGA, Red Sox, NBA and NHL action on 14 HDTVs. 413-863-2882.

DEJA BREW, 57A Lockes Village Road, Wendell: John Sheldon. “Up Close & Personal.” 8 to
10 p.m. dejabrewpub.com/

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: 7 p.m. John Whelan and Annalivia. $12.50, $15. www.iheg.com.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Sunday Funday with Marlene and pals. 8 p.m. Free. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Red Sox vs. Kansas City at 1 p.m. Bruins vs. Florida at 3 p.m. Free pool all night with Big Dan in the sports Bar. 773-8313.

Dance

BELLY DANCE classes at Dance Northampton Studio, 492 Pleasant St., Northampton. Sundays at 3 p.m. Study the ancient art of Middle Eastern belly dance with Attar. For more information call 259-7504, www.ancientartofbellydance.com.

Music

AMHERST COLLEGE ALUMNUS and visiting professor of music, Harold Meltzer ’88, presents original compositions. 3 p.m. Buckley Recital Hall in the Arms Music Center, Amherst College. Free. 542-2195 or email concerts@amherst.edu.

SHAPE NOTE SINGING: Participatory singing for all ages. 3 to 5:30 p.m. Centre Congregational Church parlor, 193 Main St., Brattleboro, Vt. All are welcome. Shape note singing is powerful, a capella singing in four part harmony — joyful, deeply moving and spiritual. Listeners, beginners and people of all ages invited. No musical experience necessary. Music books will be available for loan or purchase. A potluck snack will be shared. Free. Parking on the street or behind the church. For more information, call 802-674-6963, danhertzler@gmail.com.

UMASS CONCERT BAND performs “A Bernstein Tribute,” “Old Churches” by Michael Colgrass, “Thus Do You Fare, My Jesus” by Johann Sebastian Bach, “An American Elegy” by Frank Ticheli, “Mancini!” “Men of Ohio” by Henry Fillmore and “Sea Songs” by Ralph Vaughan Williams. 2 p.m. Fine Arts Center Concert Hall, Umass, Amherst. $3 UMass students, $5 other students, seniors and children under 18, $10 general public. 545-2511, fac.umass.edu/musicanddance.h

Potpourri

DISNEY ON ICE concludes. See Thursday’s listing.

EDIBLE BOOKS: Florence Community Center, 140 Pine St., Florence. 2 to 4 p.m. Everyone and all topics welcome. Past entries have included an Atlas represented by a globe carved from a whole watermelon, a “Catcher in the Rye” made out of vegetables, dip and rye bread; “A Very Hungry Caterpillar” fashioned from cupcakes and a fantastical Emerald City from “The Wizard of Oz” covered in green sugar “glitter.” Enter your own creation or just come to admire and eat amazing book art. For more information, www.forbeslibrary.org.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD, 80 Old Main St., Deerfield. ∎“Sheep to Shears to Shawls,” 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dwight House. Drop in any time. Apprentice’s Workshop. Meet Lisa Westervelt of Cranberry Moon Farm in Cummington and her heritage sheep. She will bring three different breeds of sheep to meet visitors, and will be on hand to teach more about sheep and the uses of their wool as she demonstrates wool spinning for the public. Arrive promptly for a 1 p.m. or 1:30 p.m. shearing demonstration by award-winning shearer Kevin Ford of Charlemont. Nearby, visitors can watch how spun wool is woven on a 19th-century barn-frame loom, and also try out their own weaving skills on our teaching loom. ∎ “Three Bags Full: All About Wool” History Workshop continues, see Thursday’s listing. Included with general admission: $12 adults, $5 youth (ages 6-17), free for children under 6 and members. www.historic-deerfield.org, 413-775-7127.

LITTLE E concludes, see Saturday’s listing.

MOSTLY YOGA: Sunday mornings from 10 to 11:15 at Wendell Free Library. Donation of $3 or more requested. A variety of yoga styles offered as well as chi-gong and psycho-calisthenics. Teachers include “Apollo” Compagnone, Shay Cooper, Donna Horn, Sam Scherer, Patty Smythe, Christine Texiera and Susan Von Ranson. While many students attend regularly, all are welcome to participate in individual classes as it fits their schedules. Bring a yoga mat. Do not wear scents or perfumes. Through May.

Monday 22

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Red Sox baseball on 14 HDTVs.
413-863-2882.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Bingo!
863-2866, thevoo.net.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield.Red Sox vs. Oakland at 6:30 p.m. Free pool all night in the sports bar. Country music with host Kathy and her candy bowl Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. Monday Madness with Big Dan in the Sports Bar. 773-8313.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Sunshine Story Time. 10 a.m. Kay Lyons brings a blend of read-aloud, sing-along, play-along fun to families with young children. In the LeVanway Meeting room. For more information, contact Lyons at 772-1544, ext. 5, www.greenfieldpubliclibrary.org. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. The meeting room will be open Monday through Friday from noon to 2 p.m. for Writer’s Lunch. Self-directed free writing time open to any writer who is looking for a place to work through their lunch. Bring own lunch and beverage. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details. ∎ Open for Business. 2 p.m. Telecommuters and local business people looking for reliable WiFi and a quiet workspace are invited to the library’s LeVanway Meeting room Mondays through Fridays from 2 to 5 p.m. Acess to the room is free and open to all who need a space to work.

Speakers

NORTHFIELD KIWANIS’ SPEAKER SERIES presents David Rainville of The Recorder who will talk about his experience covering Northfield. 7 p.m. Northfield Town Hall. Dinner at 6:30 p.m. If planning on dining, call Steve Stoia at 498-5921 by Thursday or Friday before the meeting.

Tuesday 23

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Two free games of pool with each pitcher of beer.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: ∎ 7 p.m. Junior Brown. $25, $30. ∎ 10 p.m. Latin Night. No Cover. www.iheg.com.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Bruins vs. Philadelphia at 7:30 p.m. Red Sox vs. Oakland at 6:30 p.m. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. Trivia at 7 p.m. Open Beer Pong tournament with Stacey starts at 9 p.m. 773-8313.

Films

“THE SHINING” at Amherst Cinema, Amherst. 7 p.m. Part of “Books Into Films” series. Director Stanley Kubrick. Rated R. www.amherstcinema.org. Regular admission.

Library

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: ∎ Beginning today, kids can spend their school vacation finding 10 storybook characters hiding around the children’s section. Get a clue sheet at the Kids’ Desk, and look closely — up, down and all around. They’ll be hiding in unexpected places. When you find each character, write down their name. Bring completed clue sheet to the Kids’ Desk to claim a prize and check out a book while you are there. ■ Preschool Story Hour at 10 a.m. For children 5 and under. Weekly hour of story and craft time with Sally Ahearn. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. The library’s meeting room will be open each Monday through Friday for a writer’s lunch. This is a self-directed free writing time open to any writer who is looking for a place to work through their lunch. Bring your own lunch and beverage and stop in for all or part of the writer’s lunch. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more information.

Literary

JOANNA LILLIAN BROWN, local author, will discuss what it means to be a good caregiver in end of life care. 6:30 p.m. S. White Dickinson Memorial Library, 202 Chestnut Plain Road, Whately. Her book, “Caring for Dying Loved Ones: A Helpful Guide for Families and Friends” was published in 2010. 665-2170, www.whately.org, caringfordyinglovedones.com.

GREENFIELD WORD, always the third Tuesday, unless we cancel. 9 Mill St., Greenfield. Doors open at 7 p.m., open mic starts 7:30 p.m. Bring those poems you have been writing, everyone is a featured reader this month. It will start with the typical 5-minute slots but that may change, depending on the crowd. $1 to $5 sliding scale cover.

POET’S SEAT POETRY CONTEST awards ceremony. 22nd annual, 7 p.m., in the Capen room at Stoneleigh-Burnham School, Bernardston Road, Greenfield. This contest, which is open to all Franklin County resident, has been sponsored by the Friends of the Greenfield Public Library annually since 1990. Last year, there were about 150 entries in the adult division. The competition honors Frederick Goddard Tuckerman who lived in Greenfield from 1847 until his death in 1873. He was considered by his contemporaries — Emerson, Thoreau, and Tennyson — to be a gifted poet. All finalists will be reading their poems at the ceremony and awards will be given in three categories: first, second and third place in the adult division and the two top poems of the youth divisions — ages 12-14 and 15-18. A chapbook with all of the poems will be available to all who attend. The adult first-prize winner will receive, among other things, stewardship of the Poet’s Seat chair, with their name on a plaque listing all the previous winners. Pottery provided by Stephen Earp Redware. This event is free and open to the public and refreshments will be served.

Music

CHAPEL JAZZ ENSEMBLE performs music by Jeff Coffin/Ryan Middagh, Bob Mintzer, Pat Metheny/Bob Curnow, UMass graduate jazz alum Chris Merz, Felipe Salles, Sherisse Rogers and Antonio Carlos Jobin. 8 p.m. Bowker Auditorium, UMass- Amherst. Tickets $3 UMass students, $5 other students, seniors, children under 18; $10 general public. 545-2511, fac.umass.edu/musicanddance or at the door.

FANCY & NOT SO FANCY MUSIC ca. 1500, Five College Collegium in concert. 8 p.m. Abbey Chapel, Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley. Music by Ockeghem, Busnois and Josquin and voices and instruments. Free.

Wednesday 24

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Hump Night Karaoke in the Sports Bar hosted by Dirty Johnny, 9 p.m. to midnight. No cover.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: 7 p.m. The Senegal-America Project featuring Tony Vacca and Bidew Bou Bess. $12.50, $15. www.iheg.com.

PEARL STREET BALLROOM, 10 Pearl St., Northampton: 8 p.m. JJ Grey and Mofro. $17.50, $20. www.iheg.com.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Red Sox vs. Oakland at 4 p.m. Watch 50 inch HDTVs. Restaurant Appreciation Night. Come in wearing your work shirt or show a pay stub and receive a prize from Big Dan in the Sports Bar. Free pool for bar/restaurant employees. Sign up for prizes and giveaways. 773-8313.

Dance

LINE DANCING at the Moose Lodge, 20 School St., Greenfield. 7 p.m. Beginner to intermediate. Ring the doorbell for admittance. $5 per session. For more information, call Pat at 665-4260,
jokellogg@aol.com.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ■ Sunshine Story Time. 10 a.m. Kay Lyons brings a blend of read-aloud, sing-along, play-along fun to families with young children. In the LeVanway Meeting Room. For more information, Lyons at 772-1544, ext. 5 ■ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. The library’s meeting room will be open each Monday through Friday for a writer’s lunch. This is a self-directed free writing time open to any writer who is looking for a place to work through their lunch. Bring your own lunch and beverage and stop in for all or part of the writer’s lunch. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more information. * Poet’s Supper. 6 to 8 p.m. Poetry workshop each Wednesday in April in the LeVanway Room. Lead by Joannah Whitney. Bring a bag supper to eat. Free.
www.greenfieldpubliclibrary.org.

Music

MIDWEEK MUSIC at All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church, Hope and Main streets, Greenfield. Wednesdays from 12:15 to 12:45 p.m. Today: Greenfield Community College Chorus. Margery Heins, director; sacred choral music. $3 to $10. Make checks payable to Mid Week Music in care of All Souls Church, P.O. 542, Greenfield, MA 01302.

NORA JANE STRUTHERS and The Party Line, in concert at the Parlor Room at Signature Sounds, 32 Masonic St., Northampton. 7 p.m. $15. 665-4036, www.parlorroommusic.com.

Literary

POETRY READING featuring Mark Hart, reading from his new award winning book, “Boy Singing to Cattle,” and Shutesbury poets Janet MacFadyen and Emily Bloch. 7 p.m. Shutesbury Town Hall,
1 Cooleyville Road, Shutesbury.

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