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A&E calendar: June 6-11

  • Submitted photo<br/>Have you heard the buzzzzz?<br/>Bees and their role as critical pollinators will be taking center stage this week during a wide variety of events, including Saturday’s Bee Festival at Second Congregational Church in Greenfield, which honors a former pastor’s contribution to raising bees. Above is a picture from a previous Bee Fest. You can find more information under Saturday’s “Fairs & Festivals.” Also this week, FirstFriday Greenfield has a bee theme (see “Potpourri”) and the Just Roots Spring Farm Festival on Sunday will include performance of “To Bee or not to Bee,” by Piti Theatre (see “Fairs & Festivals”). While we’re on the subject, Piti Theatre has a listing of both this week’s and upcoming bee-related events at http://ptco.org/beeweek.

    Submitted photo
    Have you heard the buzzzzz?
    Bees and their role as critical pollinators will be taking center stage this week during a wide variety of events, including Saturday’s Bee Festival at Second Congregational Church in Greenfield, which honors a former pastor’s contribution to raising bees. Above is a picture from a previous Bee Fest. You can find more information under Saturday’s “Fairs & Festivals.” Also this week, FirstFriday Greenfield has a bee theme (see “Potpourri”) and the Just Roots Spring Farm Festival on Sunday will include performance of “To Bee or not to Bee,” by Piti Theatre (see “Fairs & Festivals”). While we’re on the subject, Piti Theatre has a listing of both this week’s and upcoming bee-related events at http://ptco.org/beeweek.

  • Are you READY<br/>for this?<br/>The 1794 Meetinghouse in New Salem is kicking off its new season with Li’l BeeDee and the Doo-Rites and champagne.  You can expect high-energy rockabilly, rhythm and blues from this band. There are sound samples on the band’s web site, which is where we also found this quoted review “Nothing can really prepare you for an explosion of talent like this.”  Also this week at the meeting house, Clay Jazz Sunday. See “Music.” Submitted photo

    Are you READY
    for this?
    The 1794 Meetinghouse in New Salem is kicking off its new season with Li’l BeeDee and the Doo-Rites and champagne. You can expect high-energy rockabilly, rhythm and blues from this band. There are sound samples on the band’s web site, which is where we also found this quoted review “Nothing can really prepare you for an explosion of talent like this.” Also this week at the meeting house, Clay Jazz Sunday. See “Music.” Submitted photo

  • Submitted photo<br/>Windborne in Ashfield Friday<br/>Windborne, which tells us it specializes in close harmony, comes to Ashfield Friday. See “Music.”

    Submitted photo
    Windborne in Ashfield Friday
    Windborne, which tells us it specializes in close harmony, comes to Ashfield Friday. See “Music.”

  • Submitted photo<br/>Roger Salloom returns Saturday<br/>Roger Salloom will return to the Arts Block Saturday with a crew of talented musicians, including opener Natalie McKnight. An engaging songwriter whose works have appeared on the Grammy ballot in 20 categories over the past three years, Salloom sold out his last show at the Arts Block.  See “Music.”

    Submitted photo
    Roger Salloom returns Saturday
    Roger Salloom will return to the Arts Block Saturday with a crew of talented musicians, including opener Natalie McKnight. An engaging songwriter whose works have appeared on the Grammy ballot in 20 categories over the past three years, Salloom sold out his last show at the Arts Block. See “Music.”

  • Submitted photo<br/>Roger Salloom returns Saturday<br/>Roger Salloom will return to the Arts Block Saturday with a crew of talented musicians, including opener Natalie McKnight, pictured. An engaging songwriter whose works have appeared on the Grammy ballot in 20 categories over the past three years, Salloom sold out his last show at the Arts Block.  See “Music.”

    Submitted photo
    Roger Salloom returns Saturday
    Roger Salloom will return to the Arts Block Saturday with a crew of talented musicians, including opener Natalie McKnight, pictured. An engaging songwriter whose works have appeared on the Grammy ballot in 20 categories over the past three years, Salloom sold out his last show at the Arts Block. See “Music.”

  • AMERICAN HARMONY, a chorus of musical re-enactors, present songs that stirred the soul of early America. Friday, 7 p.m. Mary Lyon Church, Upper Street, Buckland Center. The program includes some of the most popular sacred and secular songs of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Directed by music historian Nym Cooke, author of a new book and CD coming out this fall titled “American Harmony.” Pie social will follow. $6 adults, $3 students 12 and under. Benefit for the Buckland Historical Society.<br/>

    AMERICAN HARMONY, a chorus of musical re-enactors, present songs that stirred the soul of early America. Friday, 7 p.m. Mary Lyon Church, Upper Street, Buckland Center. The program includes some of the most popular sacred and secular songs of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Directed by music historian Nym Cooke, author of a new book and CD coming out this fall titled “American Harmony.” Pie social will follow. $6 adults, $3 students 12 and under. Benefit for the Buckland Historical Society.

  • “YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU” presented by Ashfield Community Theater. Friday, 7 p.m. Ashfield Town Hall, 412 Main St., Ashfield. Continues Saturday at 7 p.m. Sweet-hearted comedy about living life now and pursuing your dreams. It revolves around the Sycamore family. Dad is in the basement perfecting fireworks, Mom is busy writing plays in the living room, sister Essie makes candies and practices ballet to the music her husband plays on his xylophone, Grandpa has ditched a successful banking career because it wasn’t fun enough, and their visitors include the ex-Grand Duchess of Russia, now a waitress. Daughter number two (think Marilyn Munster) falls in love with a stuffy banker’s son. The parents, the Kirbys, arrive for a dinner a night early, seeing the family in its natural state. $12 at the door. For online reservations go to acth.org. For more information go to www.acth.org and Ashfield Community Theater on Facebook.<br/>Pictured: Jackie Walsh ponders midscene at her desk as Penny.<br/>Recorder/Micky Bedell

    “YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU” presented by Ashfield Community Theater. Friday, 7 p.m. Ashfield Town Hall, 412 Main St., Ashfield. Continues Saturday at 7 p.m. Sweet-hearted comedy about living life now and pursuing your dreams. It revolves around the Sycamore family. Dad is in the basement perfecting fireworks, Mom is busy writing plays in the living room, sister Essie makes candies and practices ballet to the music her husband plays on his xylophone, Grandpa has ditched a successful banking career because it wasn’t fun enough, and their visitors include the ex-Grand Duchess of Russia, now a waitress. Daughter number two (think Marilyn Munster) falls in love with a stuffy banker’s son. The parents, the Kirbys, arrive for a dinner a night early, seeing the family in its natural state. $12 at the door. For online reservations go to acth.org. For more information go to www.acth.org and Ashfield Community Theater on Facebook.
    Pictured: Jackie Walsh ponders midscene at her desk as Penny.
    Recorder/Micky Bedell

  • File photo<br/>A celebration of Alice Parker<br/>Alice Parker of Hawley is well known in this area for her sings, which encourage people to gather together to create musical harmony. She is also known worldwide for her compositions and those set to poetry will be featured during a celebration of her being hosted by Smith College on Sunday. See “Music.”<br/>

    File photo
    A celebration of Alice Parker
    Alice Parker of Hawley is well known in this area for her sings, which encourage people to gather together to create musical harmony. She is also known worldwide for her compositions and those set to poetry will be featured during a celebration of her being hosted by Smith College on Sunday. See “Music.”

  • RIVERFEST in downtown Shelburne Falls. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Beginning at 10 a.m., the village streets will be filled with the music of the All-Valley Jazz Jam featuring Jill Connolly and local performers Last Night’s Fun and Belle Ami. Children’s games, craft workshop, face painting and Frog & Flower Parade. After the parade, marchers and non-marchers are invited to join the fun of Piti Theatre’s production, “Mill Mountain River,” a tribute to the historic village of Colrain. On stage at the Senior Center. Also planned: Medicine Mammals’ Native American songs and stories; live birds of prey, Deerfield River Watershed Association’s display tables, interactive community art, arts and crafts, food vendors, more. Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum will celebrate with Nickle Ice Cream cones. Between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Riverfest attendees will be able to purchase a trolley token at the Shelburne Falls Trolley booth across from McCusker’s Market for a nickel and redeem the token at the Trolley Museum for a Nickle Snow’s Nice Cream. Rain or shine.<br/>

    RIVERFEST in downtown Shelburne Falls. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Beginning at 10 a.m., the village streets will be filled with the music of the All-Valley Jazz Jam featuring Jill Connolly and local performers Last Night’s Fun and Belle Ami. Children’s games, craft workshop, face painting and Frog & Flower Parade. After the parade, marchers and non-marchers are invited to join the fun of Piti Theatre’s production, “Mill Mountain River,” a tribute to the historic village of Colrain. On stage at the Senior Center. Also planned: Medicine Mammals’ Native American songs and stories; live birds of prey, Deerfield River Watershed Association’s display tables, interactive community art, arts and crafts, food vendors, more. Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum will celebrate with Nickle Ice Cream cones. Between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Riverfest attendees will be able to purchase a trolley token at the Shelburne Falls Trolley booth across from McCusker’s Market for a nickel and redeem the token at the Trolley Museum for a Nickle Snow’s Nice Cream. Rain or shine.

  • Submitted photo<br/>Have you heard the buzzzzz?<br/>Bees and their role as critical pollinators will be taking center stage this week during a wide variety of events, including Saturday’s Bee Festival at Second Congregational Church in Greenfield, which honors a former pastor’s contribution to raising bees. Above is a picture from a previous Bee Fest. You can find more information under Saturday’s “Fairs & Festivals.” Also this week, FirstFriday Greenfield has a bee theme (see “Potpourri”) and the Just Roots Spring Farm Festival on Sunday will include performance of “To Bee or not to Bee,” by Piti Theatre (see “Fairs & Festivals”). While we’re on the subject, Piti Theatre has a listing of both this week’s and upcoming bee-related events at http://ptco.org/beeweek.
  • Are you READY<br/>for this?<br/>The 1794 Meetinghouse in New Salem is kicking off its new season with Li’l BeeDee and the Doo-Rites and champagne.  You can expect high-energy rockabilly, rhythm and blues from this band. There are sound samples on the band’s web site, which is where we also found this quoted review “Nothing can really prepare you for an explosion of talent like this.”  Also this week at the meeting house, Clay Jazz Sunday. See “Music.” Submitted photo
  • Submitted photo<br/>Windborne in Ashfield Friday<br/>Windborne, which tells us it specializes in close harmony, comes to Ashfield Friday. See “Music.”
  • Submitted photo<br/>Roger Salloom returns Saturday<br/>Roger Salloom will return to the Arts Block Saturday with a crew of talented musicians, including opener Natalie McKnight. An engaging songwriter whose works have appeared on the Grammy ballot in 20 categories over the past three years, Salloom sold out his last show at the Arts Block.  See “Music.”
  • Submitted photo<br/>Roger Salloom returns Saturday<br/>Roger Salloom will return to the Arts Block Saturday with a crew of talented musicians, including opener Natalie McKnight, pictured. An engaging songwriter whose works have appeared on the Grammy ballot in 20 categories over the past three years, Salloom sold out his last show at the Arts Block.  See “Music.”
  • AMERICAN HARMONY, a chorus of musical re-enactors, present songs that stirred the soul of early America. Friday, 7 p.m. Mary Lyon Church, Upper Street, Buckland Center. The program includes some of the most popular sacred and secular songs of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Directed by music historian Nym Cooke, author of a new book and CD coming out this fall titled “American Harmony.” Pie social will follow. $6 adults, $3 students 12 and under. Benefit for the Buckland Historical Society.<br/>
  • “YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU” presented by Ashfield Community Theater. Friday, 7 p.m. Ashfield Town Hall, 412 Main St., Ashfield. Continues Saturday at 7 p.m. Sweet-hearted comedy about living life now and pursuing your dreams. It revolves around the Sycamore family. Dad is in the basement perfecting fireworks, Mom is busy writing plays in the living room, sister Essie makes candies and practices ballet to the music her husband plays on his xylophone, Grandpa has ditched a successful banking career because it wasn’t fun enough, and their visitors include the ex-Grand Duchess of Russia, now a waitress. Daughter number two (think Marilyn Munster) falls in love with a stuffy banker’s son. The parents, the Kirbys, arrive for a dinner a night early, seeing the family in its natural state. $12 at the door. For online reservations go to acth.org. For more information go to www.acth.org and Ashfield Community Theater on Facebook.<br/>Pictured: Jackie Walsh ponders midscene at her desk as Penny.<br/>Recorder/Micky Bedell
  • File photo<br/>A celebration of Alice Parker<br/>Alice Parker of Hawley is well known in this area for her sings, which encourage people to gather together to create musical harmony. She is also known worldwide for her compositions and those set to poetry will be featured during a celebration of her being hosted by Smith College on Sunday. See “Music.”<br/>
  • RIVERFEST in downtown Shelburne Falls. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Beginning at 10 a.m., the village streets will be filled with the music of the All-Valley Jazz Jam featuring Jill Connolly and local performers Last Night’s Fun and Belle Ami. Children’s games, craft workshop, face painting and Frog & Flower Parade. After the parade, marchers and non-marchers are invited to join the fun of Piti Theatre’s production, “Mill Mountain River,” a tribute to the historic village of Colrain. On stage at the Senior Center. Also planned: Medicine Mammals’ Native American songs and stories; live birds of prey, Deerfield River Watershed Association’s display tables, interactive community art, arts and crafts, food vendors, more. Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum will celebrate with Nickle Ice Cream cones. Between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Riverfest attendees will be able to purchase a trolley token at the Shelburne Falls Trolley booth across from McCusker’s Market for a nickel and redeem the token at the Trolley Museum for a Nickle Snow’s Nice Cream. Rain or shine.<br/>

Thursday 5

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: The Collected Poets Series featuring Partridge Boswell and Jessamyn Smyth. 7 p.m. A longtime arts advocate, Boswell has served at the vanguard of cultural activities in Northern New England as director of several regional performing arts organizations. Smyth’s “Kitsune” was a winner in the New Women’s Voices Series of Finishing Line Press (2013). Her poetry and prose have appeared in many publications. Suggested donation: $2 to $4. Please tip the baristas.

Dance

THE DANCE GENERATORS presents its annual concert of new works. 8 p.m. Dance Studio in Scott Gym, Smith College, Northampton. Repeats Friday and Saturday. Dance Generators is a multigenerational performance company of dancers ranging in ages 20 to 80. Their work challenges audiences’ ideas about dance and shakes up stereotypes about aging. In this season’s new dances, the dancers explore memory and community, celebration and play, and human relationships to nature. Tickets $15 adults, $10 students, $5 children under 12. Tickets sold at the door beginning 30 minutes before each performance, or online at www.dancegenerators.org.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. Noon to 2 p.m. Writer’s Lunch. The library’s meeting room will be open Monday through Thursday. This is a self-directed, free writing time open to any writer looking for a place to work through their lunch. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more information.

Music

COOP CONCERT at The Station, Greenfield Energy Park, 50 Miles St., Greenfield. 6 to 8 p.m. Performers Abe Loomis, Roland LaPierre and Pint-sized String Band with Mike Pattavina. The Energy Park is a short walk downhill from Main Street. These concerts are child-friendly. Bring something to sit on. Free, but donations to support the series are welcome. www.coopconcerts.org, www.greenfieldrecreation.com.

THE MARINA RESTAURANT, Putney Road, Brattleboro, Vt. 7 to 10 p.m. Kevin Parry hosts open mic every Thursday. Free. Half-price meals for performers. For information and to sign up, call 802-257-7563. www.kevinparrymusic.com.

THE PARLOR ROOM, 32 Masonic St., Northampton: Zoe Muth and The Lost High Rollers CD release show for “World of Strangers.” 7 p.m. $15.

THE WINDHAM ORCHESTRA and PanOpera performs Puccini’s “Tosca.” 7:30 p.m. Academy of Music, 274 Main St., Northampton. “Tosca” tells the brutal truth about what drives us; our passions, and desires. It’s essential Puccini — lurid, ravishing, hugely enjoyable and not to be missed. $20 all seats. academyofmusictheatre.tix.com, 584-9032 Ext. 105.

Potpourri

PERSONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY FAIR presented by the staff of Baystate Home Infusion & Respiratory Services. Noon to 4 p.m. Main Conference Rooms at Baystate Franklin Medical Center, 164 High St., Greenfield. Representatives from Boston Walk in Bath and Stairlift Co., Alert Sentry Personal Emergency Response System, ArmHer personal protection products, Franklin County Home Care, and the Franklin County TRIAD Council will participate. The event will include demonstrations of products, informational materials and items that can be purchased on site. Refreshments served. 773-2378.

Friday 6

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: North Sea Gas. 8 p.m. One of Scotland’s most popular folk bands with great vocals and tremendous three-part harmonies. Guitars, mandolin, fiddle bouzouki, whistles, bodhrans, banjo and good humor. Tickets $15; please tip the bartenders. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Dance

AMHERST INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: Every Friday night, 7:30 to 10 p.m. Bangs Community Center, Boltwood Walk, Amherst Center. Dances from the Balkans, Middle Eastern Europe, more. You need not bring a partner. Live music first Fridays of the month. Some teaching. Beginners welcome. Donation. 549-6748. www.amherstfolkdancing.org.

FIRST FRIDAY MOSTLY WALTZ, Guiding Star Grange, 401 Chapman St., Greenfield. Series hosted by Richard Wyatt. Music this month by The Moving Violations Trio: Van Kaynor, Ron Grosslein and Eric Eid-Reiner. Schedule: 7 to 7:30 p.m., beginners’ workshop; 7:30 to 8 p.m., intermediate workshop; 8:15 to 10:30 p.m., couple dances. $10. www.guidingstargrange.org/

DANCE GENERATORS repeats. See Thursday’s listing.

Films

“BABIES” presented by Pothole Pictures. Friday and Saturday, 7:30 p.m. Memorial Hall, 51 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls. This documentary looks at the first year of life of four babies from Mongolia to Namibia to San Francisco to Tokyo. This narration-free film lets us simply observe as the infants discover the universe surrounding them. Done with joyful humor and a light touch, their developmental similarities are contrasted by their cultural differences. Friday’s pre-film music: Celtic music by Glenn Ceili, 7 p.m. Saturday’s pre-film music: Daniel Hales and the frost heaves playing a mix of indie rock, folk and country, 7 p.m. $4 children, $6 adults. Air-conditioned and handicapped accessible. 625-2896. See Joseph Marcello’s Encores & Curtain Calls column Page D4.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: ∎ “Mother Goose on the Loose,” 11 a.m. Join the happy circle with Kay Lyons at a lap-sit story hour for children ages 3 and under with a grown-up every Friday morning. Rhymes, songs and movement games make up this storytime style popularized by author Betsy Diamant-Cohen. In the Picture Book Room today. ∎ Writer’s Workshop. Noon to 2 p.m. Jane Buchanan and Joannah Whitney lead the program, which includes writing exercises and discussion as well as an opportunity to share what has been written. Participants encouraged to attend the open writing periods during the week. No charge; no registration required. Contact Buchanan at 772-1544 for more information. ∎ Open for Business. 2 to 5 p.m. Telecommuters and local business people looking for reliable Wi-Fi and a quiet space to work.

Literary

MONADNOCK WRITERS’ GROUP presents a reading of poetry and prose from authors published in all Monadnock Writers’ publications. 7 p.m. Mariposa Museum, 26 Main St., Peterborough, N.H. There will be a reception from 6 to 7 p.m.; KidCraft: Origami Boxes from 5 to 6 p.m. 603-924-4555.

Music

AMERICAN HARMONY, a chorus of musical re-enactors, present songs that stirred the soul of early America. 7 p.m. Mary Lyon Church, Upper Street, Buckland Center. The program includes some of the most popular sacred and secular songs of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Directed by music historian Nym Cooke, author of a new book and CD coming out this fall titled “American Harmony.” Pie social will follow. $6 adults, $3 students 12 and under. Benefit for the Buckland Historical Society.

ESPRESSO JAZZ at Chandler’s At Yankee Candle, Routes 5 & 10, South Deerfield. 6 p.m. Wine, Food and Jazz Spectacular. Reservations: 665-1277.

RANI ARBO AND DAISY MAYHEM perform roots, rhythm and harmony. 7:30 p.m. First Friday Concerts at Coho, Amherst, 120 Pulpit Hill Road, Amherst. In the Pioneer Valley Co-Housing Community Great Room. Tickets: sliding scale $10 to $20. Tobacco, dog and fragrance-free.

ROGER MCGUINN, Academy of Music, 274 Main St., Northampton, 8 p.m. Here’s what promoter Signature Sounds has to say: “As the leader of the influential ’60s group The Byrds, he was on the leading edge, combining the rock beat of The Beatles with the folk sensibilities of Bob Dylan, to create the genre known as ‘folk-rock.’ Roger’s solo career began in 1973 and has yielded 10 albums, and a Grammy nomination.” $25-$35. 413-584-9032, ext 105. boxoffice@academyofmusictheatre.com, www.signaturesounds.com.

WINDBORNE in concert. 7:30 p.m. Ashfield Community Hall, 521 Main St., Ashfield. Windborne is Lynn Mahoney Rowan, Will Thomas Rowan, Lauren Breunig and Jeremy Carter-Gordon. Specializing in close harmony singing, the quartet has a vibrant energy and a strong connection, which is evident in their engaging performance, say promoters. $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Children 13 and under $6, $8 at the door. Ages 4 and under in laps, free. Tickets available at Elmer’s Store, Ashfield; Boswell’s Books, Shelburne Falls and World Eye Bookshop in Greenfield. www.brattleborotix.com.

Potpourri

FIRSTFRIDAY GREENFIELD. Downtown businesses are partnering with the Second Congregational Church’s fourth annual Bee Fest on Saturday to celebrate bees. From 5 to 8 p.m. on Friday, more than 25 downtown retailers and restaurants will be offering specials, sales. raffles and give-aways, signature drinks and demonstrations. There will be street musicians, beekeeping technology demonstrations and enjoy tastings of honey-drenched baklava, Lefty’s Honey Brown Ale and treats. More information is on FirstFriday Greenfield Facebook page, Students from Newton, Four Corners, and Federal Street Elementary schools, under the direction of Discovery teacher Kate Bailey, will contribute hand-made bees that will hang in the trees downtown. For more information on Bee Fest, see Saturday’s “Fairs & Festivals” Also, see Sunday’s “Fairs & Festivals” listing for information on Just Roots’ Spring Festival, which will include a performance of “To Bee or Not to Bee.”

HOME DECOR POP UP SHOP, book launch and art show. 5 to 8 p.m. 12 Flat St., Brattleboro, Vt., featuring local celebrity and award-winning TV show producer/host Desha Peacock. There will be a workshop station to create a collage of your dream home for display. Local art by Sarah Johnson and Daniel Kornguth on view.

SHELBURNE FALLS FARMERS MARKET. 2 to 6:30 p.m. Baptist Corner Lot, Main and Water streets, Shelburne Falls. Fresh produce, local meat, maple syrup, pickles, jams, jellies, marmalades, jewelry, wood crafts, seated body work, herbal products, mushrooms, fresh baked goods, wool, handwoven items, strawberries, fresh eggs, plant starts flowers, soap, silk screened clothing, children’s activities and more. Third Friday Picnics during market hours. People are asked to bring a picnic dish to share and a chair. Vendors will have fresh salad fixings for sale with free salad dressings offered by the market. Through Oct. 24.

Theater

“SHAKESPEARE’S WILL” presented by Shakespeare & Co. 7:30 p.m. 70 Kemble St., Lenox. This provocative, one-woman play by Canadian playwright Vern Thiessen imagines the bold and unapologetic journey of Shakespeare’s enigmatic wife, Anne Hathaway, and the couple’s unconventional courtship and marriage, say promoters. Through Aug. 24.

“YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU” presented by Ashfield Community Theater. 7 p.m. Ashfield Town Hall, 412 Main St., Ashfield. Continues Saturday at 7 p.m. Sweet-hearted comedy about living life now and pursuing your dreams. It revolves around the Sycamore family. Dad is in the basement perfecting fireworks, Mom is busy writing plays in the living room, sister Essie makes candies and practices ballet to the music her husband plays on his xylophone, Grandpa has ditched a successful banking career because it wasn’t fun enough, and their visitors include the ex-Grand Duchess of Russia, now a waitress. Daughter number two (think Marilyn Munster) falls in love with a stuffy banker’s son. The parents, the Kirbys, arrive for a dinner a night early, seeing the family in its natural state. $12 at the door. For online reservations go to acth.org. For more information go to www.acth.org and Ashfield Community Theater on Facebook.

Saturday 7

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: Stripmall Ballads. 8 p.m. The artist is a vehicle for the varied projects of Phillips Saylor. The music is just as the title says: ballads from the strip mall. The stories are true and the names have been changed to convict the guilty. Free. Please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Dance

FIRST SATURDAY CONTRADANCE, Guiding Star Grange, 401 Chapman St., Greenfield.Wild Asparagus with George Marshall, David Cantieni, Becky Tracy, Ann Percival and guests. Schedule: 8 to 8:30 p.m., beginners’ workshop; 8:30 to 11:30 p.m., contradance. $10 / $8 students. www.guidingstargrange.org.

Fairs & Festivals

RIVERFEST in downtown Shelburne Falls. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Beginning at 10 a.m., the village streets will be filled with the music of the All-Valley Jazz Jam featuring Jill Connolly and local performers Last Night’s Fun and Belle Ami. Children’s games, craft workshop, face painting and Frog & Flower Parade. After the parade, marchers and non-marchers are invited to join the fun of Piti Theatre’s production, “Mill Mountain River,” a tribute to the historic village of Colrain. On stage at the Senior Center. Also planned: Medicine Mammals’ Native American songs and stories; live birds of prey, Deerfield River Watershed Association’s display tables, interactive community art, arts and crafts, food vendors, more. Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum will celebrate with Nickle Ice Cream cones. Between 11 a.m. and 2 p.m., Riverfest attendees will be able to purchase a trolley token at the Shelburne Falls Trolley booth across from McCusker’s Market for a nickel and redeem the token at the Trolley Museum for a Nickle Snow’s Nice Cream. Rain or shine.

BEE FEST: 10 a.m. to noon. Second Congregational Church, Greenfield (located next to Town Hall and Greenfield Farmers Market). Fourth annual. Activities, all of them free, include myriad bee crafts for children, a Honey Tea Party, a bee dance with local children from Karen’s Dance Studio, Magpie’s free samples of honey pie, a Pollinator Parade through the farmers market with bee-costumed youngsters and 5-minute talks provided by bee researchers. Raffle of baskets full of bee or honey-related items. Silent auction. A former minister of the church, the Rev. Lorenzo Langstroth, known as the father of American beekeeping, refined the modern beehive in 1850 and wrote “The Hive and the Honeybee,” a classic book on beekeeping. For a related event, see the FirstFriday Greenfield listing under Thursday’s “Potpourri.” Also, see Sunday’s “Fairs & Festivals” listing for information on Just Roots’ Spring Festival, which will include a performance of “To Bee or Not to Bee.”

Films

POTHOLE PICTURES: “Babies” concludes. See Friday’s listing.

Library

SUNDERLAND LIBRARY, 20 School St., Sunderland. Make your own Bonsai Tree. 1 p.m. Doug Taylor, president of the Bonsai Society of Greater Springfield, leads a workshop. $25 suggested donation. Register by calling 665-2642.

WHATELY LIBRARY, 202 Chestnut Plain Road, Whately: Tales & Tunes Storytime and Craft. 10:30 a.m. Miss Wendy will share stories, guitar sing-a-longs, puppets, flannel board stories and a simple craft project. Repeats July 12 and Aug. 2.

Music

1794 MEETINGHOUSE, 26 South Main St., New Salem: Li’l BeeDee and the Doo-Rites perform rockabilly, rhythm and blues. 7:30 p.m. Champagne reception. $15. 978-544-5200.

THE ARTS BLOCK, 289 Main St., Greenfield: Roger Salloom performs his infectious sound and eclectic band of studio quality musicians to the Arts Block. Blues, jazz and everything else! 8 p.m. Special guests include Natalie McKnight, Joe Boyle, Tommy McCarthy, Pete Grimaldi, Bruce Krasin and Dave Lincoln. $15. Tickets available online at the “live” page of rogersalloom.com or World Eye Bookshop in Greenfield and Serio’s Market in Northampton. 774-0150 or info@theartsblock.com.

CAMERON’S WINERY, 766 Swanzey Road, Swanzey, N.H. Kick off to its summer concert series and summer events. Noon to 2 p.m., Dan Fyffe in concert. Soft rock, country, blues. 2 to 4 p.m., Maureen Sky of Bernardston, author of a new children’s book, “The Bling Fairies of Junket Falls” will read and sign books and host a Fairy Tea Party. 6 to 8 p.m., Falltown String Band in concert. 6 to 8 p.m., reception for artist Waltraud Bunl. Pastels, oils, acrylics, watercolors.

PARLOR ROOM, 32 Masonic St., Northampton: Stone Coyotes in concert. 8 p.m. Bare-bones rock family trio from Greenfield. $14. If you don’t have tickets yet, then we regret to inform you that this show has sold out, as the Parlor Room often does. 413-923-2800.

SONG & STORY SWAP at The Nacul Center, 592 Main St., Amherst. With guests Lorre Wyatt and Michael Nix. 7 p.m. Wyatt, a popular figure on the folk circuit since the early 1970s, Wyatt engages audiences with a vibrant blend of classic and contemporary folk songs. Multi-instrumentalist Nix give a performance rich in variety, tradition and irresistible sing-alongs. Free. 687-5002.

Potpourri

IMMIGRANT VOICES: Families, Schools, and the Community. 10 a.m. to noon. First Congregational Church, 43 Silver St., Greenfield. Jimena De Pareja and Rebecca Wright will share stories featuring students’ and their parents’ own voices. Free. RSVP for childcare. www.massslaveryapology.org, email@massslaveryapology.org or call 625-2951.

GREENFIELD FARMERS MARKET, Court Square and Town Common. 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Locally grown and produced farm products and locally made crafts. Every Saturday. www.greenfieldfarmersmarket.com.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD: Open Hearth Cooking Demonstration. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hall Tavern Kitchen. “Cooking with Herbs.” Experience the signs, sounds and aromas of hearth cooking with the use of herbs, adding freshness and flavor to seasonal dishes. Continues June 14, 21, 28. Admission $14 adults, $5 children 6 to 17. Free for children under 6. 775-7214, historic-deerfield.org.

ORCHIDS AND WILDFLOWERS AT HIGH LEDGES. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come to the High Ledges Wildlife Sanctuary in Shelburne and enjoy spring wildflowers. Join Nancy Goodman, native orchid enthusiast and naturalist, who has been looking for and photographing wild orchids for the last 20 years. For ages 14 and older. Free. To register, call 800-859-2960.

SHINTAIDO ROCKS! This movement class is open to everyone and is followed by an afternoon of live music, a barbecue and beverages. 2 p.m. Shintaido Farm, 595B River Road in Deerfield. The band is a Grateful Dead cover band from New York City called Grateful Dad. Register at www.sne.shintaido.org. $20 includes class, entertainment, food and drink. Students, $15; children, $7. sbillias@comcast.net; 475-3745.

Theater

“IN THE (413)” presented by New Century Theatre. 7 p.m. Theatre, 14, Mendenhall Center, Smith College Campus, Northampton. Come toast life inside the 413 area code. Laugh and celebrate our collective Western Massachusetts hometowns with an evening of six original tales by local authors presented as old-time radio theatre. Join WHMP host Bill Newman and the Expandable Brass Band. Stories by Jarice Hanson and Frank Aronson, the Ha-Ha’s, Paul Ita, Dan Robert and Lisha Brooks, Cathy McNally, Bill Dwight and Phil O’Donoghue. $25. Student and starving artist discounts available. 587-3933, www.newcenturytheatre.org.

“JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT,” Faith Baptist Church, 331 Silver St., Saturday and Sunday at 6 p.m. It will be performed by local church vocalists and musicians. Free.

“PIERCE TO THE SOUL” presented by Next Stage Arts Project. 7:30 p.m. 15 Kimball Hill, Putney, Vt. Staged reading of the one-man play. It tells the story of Elijah Pierce, a barber, preacher and folk artist of no small significance. Playwright Chiquita Mullins Lee performs the piece. This event was rescheduled from its original Black History month February. $10 suggested donation. 802-387-0102.

SHAKESPEARE’S “KING LEAR” from Britain’s National Theatre. 1 p.m. Amherst Cinema, 28 Amity St., Amherst. An aged king decides to divide his kingdom between his three daughters, according to which of them is most eloquent in praising him. $24. www.amherstcinema.org.

“SHAKESPEARE’S WILL” continues. 7:30 p.m. See Friday’s listing.

“YOU CAN’T TAKE IT WITH YOU” concludes. See Friday’s listing.

Sunday 8

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: Alan Williams. 2:30 p.m. The music of Birdsong At Morning, with its themes of self-discovery and reinvention. Free. Please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamaya’s.com.

Dance

“COLLECT ‘EM ALL,” an original dance concert featuring dancers from the Mohawk school district and Northampton. 6:30 p.m. Mohawk Trail Regional High School, Buckland. New choreography created by Martha Lively, local dance artist and artistic director of Lively Dance. $10; $8 for ages 65 and older and children under 12. Children under 5 free. 628-3805.

Fairs & Festivals

JUST ROOTS SPRING FARM FESTIVAL: 3 to 7 p.m. Greenfield Community Farm, 34 Glenbrook Drive, Greenfield. Work parties: rocking and weeding in the field, community garden work, herb farm work, face painting, Discussion: The Agricultural Justice Project; wildlife walk led by naturalist Ted Watt; plowing with pigs demonstration; farm tour, herbal medicine talk, kids activity, dinner, bonfire and performances. Piti Theatre will present “To Bee or Not To Bee” at 6 p.m. Here is what Piti Theatre has to say about the performance: “Farmer James has lost his bees, there’s only gruel to eat and now the townspeople (the audience) have arrived to protest, chanting ‘There’s no good food, we’re in a bad mood.’ ‘To Bee’ tells James’ comic, tragic and ultimately hopeful story — complete with puppetry, clowning, dance, live music and lots of audience participation. Piti created the show to raise awareness about the honeybee’s plight and gives children and adults tools for helping bees thrive in their communities.” For more information contact Annie Burdett at 325-8969, www.justroots.org.

Literary

EVAN KENWARD, Northfield Mount Hermon graduate, will sign his book “Young Wanderlust.” 2:30 to 4 p.m. World Eye Bookshop, 156 Main St., Greenfield. 772-2186.

Music

1794 MEETINGHOUSE, New Salem. Clay Jazz. 4 p.m. Sarah Clay, vocals and flute; Claire Arenius, drums; Ed Brainerd, flugelhorn; Ken Forfia, piano, and Wayne Roberts on upright bass. Bossa nova, blues, jazz, contemporary, Latin and classical music. $10. For tickets: www.1794meetinghouse.org.

NORTHAMPTON BREWERY, 11 Brewster Court, Northampton. Banish Misfortune performs traditional Irish hornpipes, reels, jigs, waltzes, polkas, airs and songs. 5 to 8 p.m. Every Sunday. Free.

SHAPE NOTES AND MORE: a 19th-Century Sing. 2 to 5 p.m. Meeting House, Hawley. Hawley’s own Alice Parker and a special guest will lead singers in many of the shape-note hymns, Civil War songs, parlor ballads and folk tunes sang in June 1864. For more information and to register, call 339-4747 or online at singwithalice.blogspot.com.

Potpourri

EMILY DICKINSON MUSEUM’S Garden Day. 280 Main St., Amherst. 1 to 4 p.m. An afternoon of gardening activities for all ages, including a children’s garden tour at 1:30 p.m. and a historic garden tour at 2:30 p.m. Led by Marta McDowell. She will also sign copies of her new book “Beatrix Potter’s Gardening Life.” Visitors are invited to start their own herbarium, just as Dickinson did as a young girl. www.emilydickinsonmuseum.org.

PICCADILLY CIRCUS at Franklin County Agricultural Fairgrounds, 89 Wisdom Way, Greenfield. 1, 3:30 and 6 p.m. Featuring Herds of Elephants with “Bo,” which is being called “the biggest performing elephant on earth,” the Human Cannonball, a Herd of Racing Camels, Miss Pretzel who twists her body, Lucio the Funniest Guy ever, elephants, ponies, camels, bouncy house rides and meet-and-greet characters. Free children’s tickets in area stores and schools. Adults get buy-one-get-one free online in advance at www.thefuncircus.com.

Theater

“JOSEPH AND THE AMAZING TECHNICOLOR DREAMCOAT” concludes, see Saturday’s listing.

“SHAKESPEARE’S WILL” continues at 3 p.m. See Friday’s listing.

Monday 9

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: ∎ Sunshine Story Time, 10 a.m. Kay Lyons brings a blend of read-aloud, sing-along, play-along fun to families with young children. There’s half an hour of story time and a few minutes of visiting and play time for active young children made possible by funding from the Friends of the Greenfield Public Library. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details. ∎ Open for Business. 2 to 5 p.m. Telecommuters and local business people looking for reliable Wi-Fi and a quiet workspace. Mondays and Fridays from 2 to 5 p.m.

WHATELY LIBRARY, 202 Chestnut Plain Rd., Whately: Howard Nenner, author of “Another World, Another time” will have a talk and book signing. 6:30 p.m. the book is a wry and poignant memoir of the author’s early life in the East Bronx.

Tuesday 10

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: ∎ Open for Business. 2 to 5 p.m.

∎ Preschool Story Hour. 10 a.m. Parents with kids 5 and under are invited for a weekly hour of story and craft time fun. Meet other people with small children and enjoy stories, songs, fingerplays and crafts with Sally Ahearn. In the LeVanway Meeting room. No sign up required. Free. For more information, call the children’s librarian at 772-1544, ext. 5. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Music

PIONEER VALLEY SYMPHONY hosts Summer Sings at Most Holy Redeemer Parish Hall, 122 Russell St., Hadley 7 p.m. Today: Carmina Burana, Carl Orff. Conducted by PVS Music Director Paul Phillips and PVS Chorus Director Jonathan Harvey. $10. Tickets at the door.

Wednesday 11

Dance

LINE DANCE LESSONS every Wednesday from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Moose Lodge, School Street, Greenfield. Beginner to intermediate. $5 per session. Ring the doorbell for admission. Beginner lessons at 7 p.m.; intermediate at 8. Call Pat at 665-4260 or email jokellogg@aol.com for more information.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: ∎ Noon to 2 p.m. STEM Story Hour. Join Donna Rivers, educator and story reader, for this preschool story time focused on science, technology, engineering and math. Over the course of six sessions, families will build a STEM box of their own with tools and materials provided by the program. Registration at the Children’s Room. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-544 for more details. ∎ Chess Club. 5:30 to 7:45 p.m. Contact calderrossi@gmail with questions. The first Monday of the month will feature a speed chess tournament.

Music

MIDWEEK MUSIC, All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church, Hope and Main streets, Greenfield. 12:15 to 12:45 p.m. A donation of $3 to $10 is appreciated, and helps to support future concerts. Today: Hunter Paye, Folk guitar. Final concert of the spring season.

PORTER-PHELPS-HUNTINGTON MUSEUM, 130 River Dr., Hadley. The 33rd season of Wednesday Folk Traditions kick off with Youssoupha Sidibe. A Grammy-nominated Senegalese Master Kora player, Sibide breaks with tradition to create a new genre that blends aspects of western music with Reggae and ancient African Harp styles. 410, $2 children 16 and under. Picnickers welcome on the museum grounds beginning at 5 p.m. Smoke free site. 584-4699, www.pphmuseum.org.

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