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Parking garage work to move inside, Olive Street to be open to traffic again

  • Construction crews will begin dismantling the crane used to assemble pre-cast pieces of the parking garage on Olive Street starting Wednesday in Greenfield, photographed on Tuesday, July 10, 2018. Recorder Staff/Dan Little

  • Construction crews will begin dismantling the crane used to assemble pre-cast pieces of the parking garage on Olive Street starting Wednesday in Greenfield, photographed on Tuesday, July 10, 2018. Recorder Staff/Dan Little

  • Construction crews will begin dismantling the crane used to assemble pre-cast pieces of the parking garage on Olive Street starting Wednesday in Greenfield, photographed on Tuesday, July 10, 2018. Recorder Staff/Dan Little

  • Construction crews will begin dismantling the crane used to assemble pre-cast pieces of the parking garage on Olive Street starting Wednesday in Greenfield, photographed on Tuesday, July 10, 2018. Recorder Staff/Dan Little

  • Seneca Leborgne helps guide a pre-cast section as it's lifted into place by a crane during construction on the parking garage on Olive Street in Greenfield, Wednesday, July 11, 2018. Recorder Staff/Dan Little

  • Joe Barata, left, and Seneca Leborgne attach crane hooks to a pre-cast section to be lifted into place during construction on the parking garage on Olive Street in Greenfield, Wednesday, July 11, 2018. Recorder Staff/Dan Little

  • A pre-cast section is lifted into place by a crane during construction on the parking garage on Olive Street in Greenfield, Wednesday, July 11, 2018. Recorder Staff/Dan Little


By DAN DESROCHERS
Wednesday, July 11, 2018

GREENFIELD — Construction of the Olive Street parking garage is nearing its final stages, as the final pre-cast concrete section for the structure is expected Thursday morning.

Traffic on the street will be impeded while the final sections are put in place and the crane used for them is disassembled through Friday but Olive Street will be open by the evening when construction moves to the garage’s interior.

The work will focus on the final details of the garage, including electrical work, welding and plumbing, said John Bona, a project manager for Skanska, the company overseeing construction. The garage is expected to be open in late October.

The electrical work includes charging stations for electric cars. Bona said the garage will eventually have the capability to charge 16 cars.

Other work will include elevator installation and a remote security system.

Mayor William Martin will be holding a “topping off ceremony” at 9 a.m., where one of the final pieces will be put in. According to a press release from Martin, union operators and iron workers will be on hand with him at the ceremony.

Bona said opening for the garage is scheduled for Oct. 24 and he expects that to remain in place.

Once the final precast sections are in place later this afternoon, Bona said workers will then disassemble the crane with a second crane. The taking apart the crane is expected to continue until 4 or 5 p.m. Friday.

Construction workers have spent the last month placing the pre-cast sections into place, moving between 15 to 18 65-foot long concrete sections a day, Bona said, which was ahead of the 12 to 15 pieces originally expected to be moved per day.

A total of 261 pre-cast concrete pieces make up the parking garage.

The slabs were delivered from an off-site location on Conway Street to Olive Street, being transported via tractor-trailer.

The tractor-trailers brought the slabs along Conway Road, down the Mohawk Trail and then through the heart of downtown along Main Street before going down Court Square and Bank Row.

The cost of the project was estimated at $10.1 million by Martin last month. Bona said he expects to project to be within that range, though said it could cost as much as $10.25 million.

The estimate was originally $10 million, but factors including underground stone foundations were discovered at the site in January pushed up the anticipated cost.

To cover the increased cost, Mayor William Martin requested $529,271 in Federal Emergency Management Agency reimbursement funds from City Council, though the council approved just $250,000. The money came from costs incurred by the city following Hurricane Irene in 2011.

To reduce costs, Martin made adjustments to the project, including terminating the clerk of the works contract with Dome Design/Build from Shelburne Falls in April, which he said previously saved about $40,000.

Once completed, the garage will be fully automated, Bona said, with visitors able to access stations within the garage to pay for parking. The garage will have a total of 272 parking spots, Bona said, which includes parking on the roof of the three-story structure.

You can reach Dan Desrochers at:

ddesrochers@recorder.com

413-772-0261, ext. 257