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Greenfield to officially become a city

  • The Greenfield Town Hall Recorder File Photo/Paul Franz

  • A rainbow appears over the Greenfield district courthouse on Hope Street Monday, June 26, 2017. Recorder file photo

  • The Greenfield fireworks display as seen from the roof of the Pushkin building in downtown Greenfield, Sunday, July 2, 2017. Recorder file photo

  • Temporary stop signs placed at the intersection of Main Street and Bank Row after a power outage in downtown Greenfield Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017. RECORDER FILE PHOTO/DAN LITTLE



Recorder Staff
Wednesday, December 20, 2017

GREENFIELD — The legislative body has spoken — Greenfield is a city, not a town.

Town Council voted unanimously to amend Greenfield’s Town Charter Wednesday night, replacing the word “town” with “city” throughout. The change will officially designate Greenfield as a city.

Greenfield is sometimes referred to as “The City known as the Town of Greenfield” — a title Council Vice President Isaac Mass said is confusing. Mass proposed the change, saying the title presents challenges in applying for grants and other state and federal applications that have eligibility dependent on the designation.

Greenfield changed to a city-style, mayor-council form of government 14 years ago.

Mass was on the council in 2004 when the change of title was last proposed, and said the idea faced some opposition. No members of the public attended Wednesday’s meeting to speak on the issue.

“I really do consider us being a city with an identity crisis,” Mass said. “I think this is something we can come to a consensus on.”

At-Large Town Councilor Penny Ricketts disagreed with the idea that Greenfield has an identity crisis, saying she doesn’t want the change to be negative.

“It is what it is,” she said.

Mass said he received a handful of emails from people on both sides of the question, but said most who were opposed to the change wanted to go back to a selectboard form of government all together.

“Whether we’re a city or a town, we’re going to have the same good things and the same bad things, just what we call ourselves is different,” Council President Brickett Allis added.