Shelburne Falls outdoor market offers alternative retail space to local makers

  • Pat Moriarty is the guiding hand behind the Conway Chair Company, a family-owned woodworking company that makes hand-sculpted chairs. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/BEN BARNHART

  • Textile artist Heather Wynne focuses on upcycling and sustainability, creating one-of-a-kind pieces, limited edition collections and sewing patterns. Her work includes canvas bags and packs, pillows, unique accessories and cloth face masks. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/BEN BARNHART

  • A native of Greece, mixed media artist Yani Counelis spent much of his professional life as an architect. Many of his paintings reflect his architectural sensibility combined with the written word. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/BEN BARNHART

  • Ann Lofquist is a landscape painter who will be selling greeting cards featuring paintings of The Mill and its environs during the Harvest Makers and Art Market on Saturday. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/BEN BARNHART

  • Artist Jeremy Sinkus uses flameworking to manipulate glass. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/BEN BARNHART

  • Sue McFarland, a handweaver and felt maker, produces functional fashion accessories, sculptural and hanging work. Her featured work for the Harvest Makers and Art Market on Saturday includes handwoven and felted scarves, and seasonal home decorations. CONTRIBUTED PHOTO/BEN BARNHART

Staff Writer
Published: 10/7/2020 2:14:30 PM

SHELBURNE FALLS — In place of usual indoor exhibits, local creatives will host a Harvest Makers and Art Market outside at The Mill at Shelburne Falls on Saturday.

From 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., the outdoor market will offer work from several artists and multiple mediums including oil and acrylic, fine woodworking, glass, pottery, textile arts, handwoven goods, weathervanes, metal fabrications and sculptures.

According to a press release from participating textile artist Sue McFarland, The Mill, which is located in the renovated Lamson & Goodnow complex at 49 Conway St., has onsite parking. Admission is free. Wearing masks and practicing social distancing protocols is required.

McFarland said many artists participate in indoor retail shows, but most, if not all of them have been canceled this year due to the lasting pandemic. Coordinating with other artists, they received approval for the outdoor event from Buckland and the local Board of Health.

“We’re taking a page out of the farmers market book,” McFarland said last week.

Artists Ann Lofquist and Yani Counelis will be featured as two-dimensional artists. Lofquist is a landscape painter who will sell greeting cards featuring paintings of The Mill and its environs. She spent several years teaching at Bowdoin College in Maine, and became recognized for her New England paintings.

Counelis, a mixed media artist and native of Greece, spent much of his professional life as an architect.

“Many of his paintings reflect his architectural sensibility combined with the written word,” McFarland said. “He translates and illustrates famous poet’s books and adds his own custom frames.”

Sculpture and metal artist Bruce Fowler never lost touch of “the joy and wonderment” of making objects out of discarded parts from interesting machinery or consumer products, McFarland said. For Fowler, taking things apart is just as much fun as putting things together, with a focus on finding objects that fit together to create an original piece.

Fellow metal artist Marian Ives graduated from the School for American Craftsmen at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Since 1972, Ives has made the creation of custom copper weathervanes her primary focus. Her work adorns homes and barns in the New England area and throughout the U.S.

The Mill’s fine woodworking studios are represented by the Conway Chair Company and Kuklinski Woodworking. Pat Moriarty is the guiding hand behind the Conway Chair Company, a family-owned woodworking company that makes hand-sculpted chairs. Tom Kuklinski uses local materials to create handmade furniture and accessories that are functional works of art.

“He strives for his work to deepen the connection to ourselves, with others, and to nature,” McFarland said of Kuklinski.

McFarland and fellow textile artist Heather Wynne share a cooperative studio in the Polishing Building at The Mill. With a focus on upcycling and sustainability, Wynne creates one-of-a-kind pieces, limited edition collections and sewing patterns. Her work includes canvas bags and packs, pillows, unique accessories and cloth face masks.

McFarland, a handweaver and felt maker, produces functional fashion accessories, sculptural and hanging work. Her featured work for the market includes handwoven and felted scarves and seasonal home decorations.

Artist Jeremy Sinkus uses flameworking to manipulate glass. A specially designed oxy/propane torch allows him control of both tiny details and larger masses of glass. With kiln casting, Sinkus achieves larger, more architectural forms of glass.

Stylist Kirsten Oxboel will also present a curated collection of vintage fashion and home decor. As a former visual merchandiser for Urban Outfitters, McFarland said Oxboel is known for her unique and whimsical taste.

Other featured items include ceramics from members of The Handle Factory community pottery studio founded last year by Molly Cantor.

More information on the outdoor market and the featured artists is available at themillatshelburnefalls.com or by calling 413-522-4944.

Zack DeLuca can be reached at zdeluca@recorder.com or 413-930-4579.



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