Marginalized groups to share stories through upcoming festival

  • Katherine Adler will be dancing in a 30-hour durational performance at St. Anne’s Church in Turners Falls as part of the annual Radical Interconnectedness Festival. Contributed photo/Abbie Duquette

  • Katherine Adler will be dancing in a 30-hour durational performance at St. Anne’s Church in Turners Falls as part of the annual Radical Interconnectedness Festival. Contributed photo/Abbie Duquette

  • Katherine Adler will be dancing in a 30-hour durational performance at St. Anne’s Church in Turners Falls as part of the annual Radical Interconnectedness Festival. Contributed photo/Abbie Duquette

  • Sara K. Lyons photographed local Native American residents for “Vital. Vibrant. Visible. Local Indigenous Identity Through Portraiture,” an exhibit that will be on display as a feature of the Radical Interconnectedness Festival. This photo by Lyons shows Jasmine Rochelle Goodspeed of Northampton. Contributed photo/Sara K. Lyons

  • Sara K. Lyons photographed local Native American residents for “Vital. Vibrant. Visible. Local Indigenous Identity Through Portraiture,” an exhibit that will be on display as a feature of the Radical Interconnectedness Festival. This photo by Lyons shows Kathleen Brown-Perez of Turners Falls. Contributed photo/Sara K. Lyons

  • Sara K. Lyons photographed local Native American residents for “Vital. Vibrant. Visible. Local Indigenous Identity Through Portraiture,” an exhibit that will be on display as a feature of the Radical Interconnectedness Festival. This photo by Lyons shows Andreus Ridley of Ashburnham. Contributed photo/Sara K. Lyons

For the Recorder
Published: 4/19/2019 6:28:48 PM

Suppressed stories from marginalized populations are on the verge of being shared with the community.

That’s the goal behind the annual Radical Interconnectedness Festival, organized by Linda McInerney of Eggtooth Productions.

“As the artistic director of a theater company, I feel a personal responsibility to shed light on the issues our society faces through the art we produce, present and commission,” McInerney said in a press release about the festival. “One of the most important issues of our time is increasing racism and discrimination against marginalized people.

“My job is to offer art that invites the participant to dig into his/her/their own implicit bias in order to overcome it. I want to create projects that jar us and check us on an ongoing basis,” she continued. “The plan is to dig back, find the stories that have been suppressed, and tell them.”

The festival, which takes place Friday, April 26 and Saturday, April 27 throughout Turners Falls, will feature 12 art offerings that engage issues of race, age, gender, religion, class and suppressed aspects of cultural identity. Tickets, which are available at eggtooth.org, are $20 and allow access to all the festival’s events.

To place the conversation in context, Eggtooth will also offer a talk with the artists and humanist scholars on Sunday, April 28, from noon to 3:30 p.m. in the Cohn Commons at Greenfield Community College.

The various artists are excited to share their pieces, which highlight both a sense of interconnection and our differences, with the community,

“Rad Fest weaves a diverse tapestry made of personal experience, research and exploration,” said Lori Holmes Clark, a Broadway dancer who will perform a piece about neurological difference called “Cloudy, with a Chance of Fringe.” “It collectively provides the audience and participants the opportunity to examine and celebrate the specific, while contributing and being exposed to a larger theme. These facets shine individually and amplify one another collectively, which, to me, is the gift diversity provides.”

“Personally, I love the name ‘Radical Interconnectedness’ and all that it implies,” added Jennifer Abeles, president of the board of directors for Voices From Inside, a writing group of women who were formerly incarcerated or in recovery that will offer a spoken word performance during the festival. “Our women find their voices through writing and then raise their voices in the world, which suffers so greatly from the silencing of too many populations. We are all necessary human resources for one another.”

Schedule

■Ongoing at the Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A — “Vital. Vibrant. Visible: Local Indigenous Identity Through Portraiture” exhibit. Photography by Sara K. Lyons, curated by Rhonda Anderson.

■Ongoing at Flourish, 102 Avenue A — Julia Whalen presents an immersive installation piece exploring childhood memory.

■5:30 p.m. on rotation, at the Great Falls Discovery Center — Ezekiel Baskin and Samuel Achilles Edwards will present “Queer Intimacies,” a short play exploring the complex beginnings of queer relationships through audience interaction.

■April 26 starting at 3 p.m. through April 27 at 9 p.m., at St. Anne’s Church, 47 J St. — Katherine Adler will offer both physical objects with corresponding meditative writings and a 30-hour durational performance.

■5 p.m. both days at the Great Falls Discovery Center — A spoken word performance by the formerly incarcerated women of Voices From Inside.

■5 p.m. both days at the Shea Theater Arts Center, 71 Avenue A — Alex DeMelo and The United Arc Performing Arts Program presents theatrical performances by members of the United Arc, an organization that supports individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

■8 p.m. both days at the Great Falls Discovery Center — “Cloudy, With a Chance of Fringe,” a contemplation of neurodiversity through song and dance by Broadway veteran Lori Holmes Clark.

■5 to 8 p.m. both days at FAB, 67 2nd St. — In this installation piece, Joe Dulude II allows the viewer to immerse themselves in the living room from his youth in the 1970s, exploring how his past shaped the way he thinks about himself and who he is.

■6 p.m. Saturday only at the Shea Theater Arts Center — Cynthia Snow and Kathy Steinem present a dance piece focusing on aging, dementia, and caregiving, with poetry by Snow and Susie Patlove. Joined by the a cappella group Acapelagos.

■7 to 8 p.m. both days at Church of Pod, 2 Prospect St. — Karen Werner presents a live experimental radio documentary performance, “Strange Radio: Live,” on the layers of time, sound and memory in Jewish Vienna.

■7 p.m. Saturday only at the Shea Theater Arts Center — “Pelala” is Terry Jenoure’s solo performance of music, storytelling and video.




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