National Weather Service: Orange storm was straight-line winds

  • Recorder Staff/Domenic PoliA section of North Main Street in Orange was shut down Wednesday afternoon because a fallen tree knocked down a service that connected a telephone pole with a residence. Orange Fire Lt. Jason Rushford said Tuesday night's storm probably weakened the old tree.

  • Recorder Staff/Domenic PoliA tree on Wheeler Avenue in Orange, knocked down by Tuesday night's storm.

  • Recorder Staff/Domenic PoliA tree on Wheeler Avenue in Orange, knocked down by Tuesday night's storm.

  • Wheeler Ave in Orange was still partially blocked by a fallen tree on Wednesday afternoon. recorder file photo

  • Wheeler Ave in Orange was still partially blocked by a fallen tree on Wednesday afternoon. June 28 2017.

Recorder Staff
Published: 6/30/2017 9:53:22 PM

ORANGE — The intense wind and rain that swept through Orange earlier this week was likely caused by a storm containing “straight-line winds,” according to a National Weather Service meteorologist.

Benjamin Sipprell, who works in the agency’s Taunton office, said Tuesday’s storm winds were created after the storm condensed the warm air it consumed.

“Then, it drops,” he said Friday. The storm was not a microburst — or sudden, powerful air current — which the NWS said was a possibility.

The storm knocked down trees and wires in Franklin County, predominantly in Orange. At one point, National Grid reported 2,644 outages, the majority of which were in Orange and Athol. Power is now restored to the North Quabbin area.

Robert Macedo, who identified himself as the volunteer coordinator for the NWS Taunton office’s Skywarn Storm Spotter Program, a nationwide initiative created by the NWS to train members of the public to gather meteorological information, posted to the Orange Fire Department’s Facebook page to explain the NWS came to its conclusion in part due to photographs and videos submitted by locals.

“Thanks so much to everyone who provided traffic info on the wind damage and hail from this severe thunderstorm,” he wrote.

Macedo said wind gusts likely reached 60 mph in Orange. The Orange Municipal Airport had a 48-mph measured wind gust, he reported.

Sipprell called Skywarn “a great resource.” More information about the program is available at http://bit.ly/2t9kzyh.


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