Huntington family says cooking with duck eggs produces strong, earthy flavor

  • Andrea Jasinski raises ducks, goats, turkeys, geese, rabbits and chickens at her family’s home in Huntington. Staff Photo/Andy Castillo

  • Abigail Jasinski, 9, cradles a duck at her family’s homestead. She says duck eggs “have fuller yolks and I feel like they’re a little more tasty than chicken eggs.” Staff Photo/Andy Castillo

  • Andrea Jasinski of Ever Growin’ Acres holds a duck on her farm in Huntington. Staff Photo/Andy Castillo

  • At Ever Growin’ Acres Farm in Huntington, the Jasinski family raise eight ducks, 10 goats, two turkeys, three geese, a half-dozen Champagne d’Argent rabbits and 25 chickens. Staff Photo/Andy Castillo

  • Andrea Jasinski says feeding their ducks and chickens vegetable table scraps maximizes the quality of eggs they produce. Staff Photo/Andy Castillo

  • Andrea Jasinski of Ever Growin’ Acres holds a goose on her farm in Huntington. Staff Photo/Andy Castillo

  • Andrea Jasinski says cooking with duck eggs, a in lighter and fluffier baked goods. Staff Photo/Andy Castillo

  • One of Andrea Jasinski’s favorite dishes to make with duck eggs is quiche, because the eggs’ stronger taste creates a robust, earthy flavor. Pictured is a spinach and turkey bacon quiche, but Jasinski says her family most often eats a bacon cheeseburger quiche. Staff Photo/Andy Castillo

  • One of Andrea Jasinski’s favorite dishes to make with duck eggs is quiche, because the eggs’ stronger taste creates a robust, earthy flavor. Pictured is a spinach and turkey bacon quiche, but Jasinski says her family most often eats a bacon cheeseburger quiche. Staff Photo/Andy Castillo

Staff Writer
Published: 4/30/2019 3:19:15 PM
Modified: 4/30/2019 3:19:05 PM

Which came first, the chicken or the egg? Neither — at least not in Andrea Jasinski’s home in Huntington, where duck eggs are a staple ingredient in many meals.

“They have fuller yolks and I feel like they’re a little more tasty than chicken eggs,” said Abigail Jasinski, her 9-year-old daughter. “I always use them in omelettes.”

Behind the house, Andrea Jasinski, 40, and her family, husband Pete Jasinski, with their daughters Hailey Jasinksi, 16, Camryn, 7, and Abigail, raise eight ducks, 10 goats, two turkeys, three geese, a half-dozen Champagne d’Argent rabbits and 25 chickens. From their homestead, Ever Growin’ Acres, they sell between a dozen and nine dozen duck eggs — in addition to chicken eggs — each week to local friends and area residents.

Andrea Jasinski, who is the farm’s primary manager, said she appreciates duck eggs because they have larger albumen, or egg white, than that of a chicken egg. As a result, Jasinski said when duck eggs are used in “cakes, pastries, cookies — anything baked — you’re going to get a lighter and fluffier end product.”

Additionally and as noted by her daughter, Jasinski said when they’re cooked on a skillet, duck eggs are strong and rich in flavor.

“If you fry or scramble the egg, you’ll notice a difference,” she said. But when they’re “mixed in with other ingredients, you’re not going to notice that strong of a flavor.”

Around her, hens clucked, geese honked, ducks quacked and a turkey gobbled. Inside a chicken and duck coop, she lifted a plastic bin with a hole cut in the side to reveal a dozen or so duck eggs nestled in straw. When laying eggs, Jasinski said ducks aren’t as neat as chickens.

“They don’t always lay where you want them to lay,” she said.

Jasinski, who grew up in Southwick, didn’t know much about farming until they started their homestead about six years ago. Since then, she said she’s learned a lot — such as feeding their ducks and chickens vegetable table scraps to maximize the quality of eggs they produce.

Jasinski said the shell of a duck egg is harder than the shell of a chicken egg, which makes the egg harder to crack but gives it a longer shelf life. The yolk is a lot bigger, too, with a higher fat and protein content, making for more nutritious meals, she said.

“The yolk of a duck egg is two or three times bigger than a chicken egg,” she said.

One of her favorite dishes to make with duck eggs is quiche, because the eggs’ stronger taste creates a robust earthy flavor. At their home, duck egg quiche made with heavy cream or milk is regularly served for breakfast, lunch or dinner.

“There’s a spinach quiche that’s really good, and an asparagus quiche,” she said. But of all the options, they most often eat homemade bacon cheeseburger quiche, which Jasinski said is a favorite of her husband because it features “a whole package of cheddar and as much bacon as possible.”

Keto bacon cheeseburger quiche

Ingredients:

6 duck eggs, beaten

½ lb. ground beef

10 strips bacon

¾ cups mayonnaise

½ onion, diced

12 oz. shredded cheddar cheese

¼ cup chives (optional)

Salt and pepper to taste

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Grease a 9-by-13-inch pan. Preheat a large skillet over medium-high heat. Cook the bacon slices to the desired crispiness, and set them aside.

Drain the grease from the pan. Add ground beef and onion. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Cook until the ground beef is no longer pink. Drain.

Combine the eggs and mayonnaise in a mixing bowl. Crumble and add the bacon, ground beef and onion, and eight ounces of cheddar cheese. Transfer the mixture to the greased pan. Cover and bake for 40 to 45 minutes.

Uncover and top with the remaining cheese. Return to oven until the cheese melts. Top with chives if desired.

Other vegetables or meats, such as spinach or turkey bacon, can be substituted with the same basic recipe. One-quarter cup of milk can be used instead of mayonnaise.

How to connect

Andrea and Peter Jasinski at Ever Growin’ Acres in Huntington can be reached by calling 413-667-7961 or emailing evergrownacres@gmail.com. Besides selling chicken and duck eggs, the farm offers blue-eyed Nigerian Dwarf goats, pedigreed Champagne D’Argent and Californian rabbits, multi-colored egg-laying chickens like Marans and Easter Eggers, and Pekin and Rouen ducks.




Greenfield Recorder

14 Hope Street
Greenfield, MA 01302-1367
Phone: (413) 772-0261
Fax: (413) 772-2906

 

Copyright © 2019 by Newspapers of Massachusetts, Inc.
Terms & Conditions - Privacy Policy