A unique civics lesson

  • Brian Ravish, the School Resource Officer at Frontier Regional School, talks with students in the street law course at the school about the Lewis Starkey III murder trial in Franklin County Superior Court. STAFF PHOTO/PAUL FRANZ

  • Brian Ravish, the School Resource Officer at Frontier Regional School, talks with students in the street law class at about the Lewis Starkey III murder trial in Franklin County Superior Court. From left are Eric Trueswell, Rearkeous “Ito” McMillan, Rachel Skribiski and Erin Senn. STAFF PHOTO/PAUL FRANZ

Staff Writer
Published: 4/12/2019 11:58:50 PM
Modified: 4/12/2019 11:58:39 PM

GREENFIELD — Walking down Main Street, a handful of Frontier Regional High School students saw the family of the deceased walking to grab a bite.

Both had just left a murder trial at Franklin County Superior Court.

“It’s something you see in the news,” Erin Senn, 16, said of the trial she and her classmates watched Wednesday. “You read about it. You watch it on TV.”

The students were in court on a field trip for their street law class at Frontier. The family was there in support of Amanda Glover, the 47-year-old woman who was killed in her Wendell home two years ago.

On Wednesday Lewis H. Starkey III took the stand in the trial that alleged he murdered his girlfriend and attempted to kill her adult son with a shotgun in the hours after an Independence Day holiday gone wrong in 2017.

“It’s seeing something you witness abstractly in a textbook, but in reality,” Eric Trueswell, 18, said. 

Teacher Laura Moore brought five students and School Resource Officer Brian Ravish for a hands-on civics lesson. For the students, it was their first time in court.

“I wanted them to see that real people have real problems,” Moore said. “Whether this alleged murderer gets convicted, he is a real person. So many real lives are affected by this.”

By Thursday, the 16-person jury found Starkey guilty of first-degree murder and attempted of murder of Devin Glover, the 27-year-old son. His sentencing is set for Tuesday at 9 a.m. Starkey faces life in prison, unless the case is overturned on appeal.Before the verdict was reached, the students spoke about what it was like to witness a portion of the trial. 

“You don’t think about what happens when people get arrested,” Rachel Skribiski, 18, said. “It was interesting to see the process.”

Wednesday was the lone time Starkey testified, and over the day he detailed his side of the facts. He explained her death was an accident. The shotgun went off in a tussle with the son, Starkey claimed, which the jury ultimately did not believe.

Starkey cried at times while on the stand in an emotional telling of his version of the facts. He talked about his beloved girlfriend, his beloved dogs and his commitment to retiring to a home soon in Vermont with them.

“This guy allegedly killed someone,” Rearkeous “Ito” McMillan, 17, said. “Looking at him it’s hard to think about. Wow.”

Eric Trueswell, 18, felt similarly.

“Part of being human is feeling sympathy and empathy toward people on difficult situations that arise,” Trueswell said. “You recognize that they are going through something very troubling. It doesn’t mean I don’t he think did it.”

You can reach Joshua Solomon at:

jsolomon@recorder.com

413-772-0261, ext. 264


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