Storm brings strong winds, power outages

  • Deerfield workers clean up on Thursday after an overnight storm caused a tree to crush this Toyota Prius and damage another vehicle at 98 North Main St. in South Deerfield. STAFF PHOTO/PAUL FRANZ

  • West Gill Road in Gill was closed on Thursday due to a downed power line near the Bernardston town line. STAFF PHOTO/PAUL FRANZ

  • A large maple tree splintered at the base, coming down on a small shed at 112 North Main St. in South Deerfield. STAFF PHOTO/PAUL FRANZ

  • A large maple tree splintered at the base, coming down on a small shed at 112 North Main St. in South Deerfield. STAFF PHOTO/PAUL FRANZ

  • Deerfield workers clean up Thursday after an overnight storm caused a tree to crush this Toyota Prius and damage another vehicle at 98 North Main St. in South Deerfield. STAFF PHOTO/PAUL FRANZ

  • Wires are repaired on West Gill Road in Gill near the Bernardston town line on Thursday. STAFF PHOTO/PAUL FRANZ

  • West Gill Road in Gill was closed Thursday due to a downed power line near the Bernardston town line. STAFF PHOTO/PAUL FRANZ

Staff Writer
Published: 10/17/2019 1:49:59 PM

Winds up to 50 mph were the main problem during Wednesday night’s storm, causing significant power outages in the North Quabbin region and east toward Worcester, but leaving central Franklin County relatively safe.

The storm affected all of southern New England, with the most extreme winds further east and on the southern coast, said National Weather Service Meteorologist Bryce Williams. Rain and less severe wind was expected to continue through Thursday, Williams said.

The extreme wind was caused by rapid pressure drops as the storm came over southern New England Wednesday evening into the overnight hours, Williams said. The most extreme weather was from 2 to 4 a.m., he said. The rain was less of a problem.

“It was a very impactful storm because of the rapidly strengthening nature of it,” Williams said.

The most significant power outages in this region were around Orange and Athol, where 39 National Grid customers lost power, according to National Grid’s website.

By 4 p.m., many homes in Orange still did not have power. Police urged residents not to go out walking due to downed power lines; and advised that residents who did not yet have power should not expect it to be restored by nightfall.

National Grid was still working on removing trees from downed lines, Orange Highway Superintendent Colin Killay said. He estimated that the town’s cleanup work would take weeks.

“We’re definitely going to be very much behind the eight ball,” Killay said. “And in the midst of trying to get ready for winter.”

Central and western Franklin County were less severely affected. The public works departments of Montague and Greenfield and the Shelburne Falls Fire District each reported a few downed trees, but no major damage or road closures.

“We came out of it quite well,” said Greenfield Public Works Director Marlo Warner.

Reach Max Marcus at mmarcus@recorder.com or 413-772-0261, ext. 261.




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