Artspace Market looks to raise $7K to increase access to art education

Glass sculptures by Taylor Litchfield, pictured at a previous Artspace Market. The event, now in its 45th year, will be held Saturday, April 6, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Greenfield High School.

Glass sculptures by Taylor Litchfield, pictured at a previous Artspace Market. The event, now in its 45th year, will be held Saturday, April 6, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Greenfield High School. STAFF FILE PHOTO/DAN LITTLE

By ABNER ROJAS

For the Recorder

Published: 04-03-2024 9:53 AM

Modified: 04-03-2024 4:42 PM


GREENFIELD — The Artspace Market is back for its 45th year, supporting local artisans while raising money to increase access to art education in Franklin County.

The event, to be held Saturday, April 6, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Greenfield High School, will feature work from more than 25 local artists and craftspeople for sale. The Artspace Market is the largest annual fundraising event for Artspace Community Arts Center on Mill Street.

“As a nonprofit, any amount of funds raised this year will make an impact for our students and community,” said Chloe Torri, Artspace’s media and communications manager.

After the Artspace Market raised about $5,000 last year, Torri is hoping to reach $7,000 this time around.

“We have a lot of big plans and dreams to meet the community’s needs and further develop Greenfield as a creative arts hub in western Mass,” Torri said.

Highlights of this year’s Artspace Market include handmade pottery by Rhodes Ceramics, and printed cards, books and screen-printed accessories by Looky Here, another Greenfield nonprofit.

In addition to artisanal goods, attendees can expect musical performances, free art activities, pottery demonstrations, a $1 per ticket artwork raffle and gift cards from local businesses. Orchard Chef will also be bringing its waffle cart if attendees get hungry, marking the first time a local food vendor will be joining the Artspace Market.

“I personally enjoy all of the local potters and ceramicists who come out to support the cause,” Torri said when asked about any goods sold at the market that stand out to her. “Pottery is such a huge part of western Mass, and we have several longtime friends of Artspace Market such as Bob Green, Malea Rhodes, and Guy Matsuda who have supported us numerous times over the years, and bring highly sophisticated and well-crafted wares.”

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Money raised through the market will support low-cost art education for Franklin County. This includes scholarships for summer Artspace youth workshops, upcoming clay classes, teen summer and after-school programs, and pottery classes.

Still, Torri doesn’t see the Artspace Market as just an opportunity to raise funds, but also a chance to attract new teachers and meet the community’s creative interests. One of those interests? A community clay studio.

“This year we are welcoming two new ceramicists, Sam Staas and Lucas May of Eight Eyes Ceramics, who not only bring young and fresh pottery to the scene but have helped us so much as educators in our community clay project,” Torri noted.

With projects like these, organizers of the Artspace Market aim to have attendees walk away on Saturday with more than just artisanal goods.

“This is a huge opportunity for community growth in Greenfield,” Torri said.

For more information on the Artspace Market, email info@artspacegreenfield.org or visit artspacegreenfield.org/artspace-market.