Gay marriage supporters see hope in conservative states

Megan Robertson, campaign manager for Freedom Indiana, makes a phone call in Indianapolis. Indiana lawmakers will decide whether to ask voters to amend the constitution to ban same-sex marriage when they reconvene in January. AP Photo

Megan Robertson, campaign manager for Freedom Indiana, makes a phone call in Indianapolis. Indiana lawmakers will decide whether to ask voters to amend the constitution to ban same-sex marriage when they reconvene in January. AP Photo

INDIANAPOLIS — In one of the most conservative states in the nation, supporters of gay marriage are pondering the unthinkable: a victory, or at least not a loss.

A proposal to amend Indiana’s constitution to ban same-sex marriage has sparked a flurry of phone banks and appeals to big-money donors as the state prepares to become a 2014 battleground on an issue that has largely been decided in other states.

Indiana is one of just four states that ban gay marriage in statute only; 29 others have constitutional bans. But none of the other states with statutory bans — Pennsylvania, West Virginia and Wyoming — face the pressure in place in Indiana, where lawmakers must approve a proposed ban and send it to voters in November unless they want to restart the process from scratch.

That the issue’s fate is even in question is remarkable in Indiana, which in recent years has become a model of conservative causes ranging from school vouchers to right to work. In 2011, state lawmakers overwhelmingly voted in favor of the amendment in the first of two required votes. But the tides have shifted. Polls have shown increasing numbers of Indiana voters oppose a constitutional ban even though most still oppose gay marriage.

“Everyone else in the country is moving toward more equality. Indiana is kind of the last stand of folks that are trying to put something like this into their constitution,” said Megan Robertson, a veteran Indiana Republican operative tapped to manage Freedom Indiana, a bipartisan coalition working to block the ban.

Volunteers with Freedom Indiana are staffing nightly phone banks and calling lawmakers who supported the amendment the first time in hopes of changing their minds before the Legislature reconvenes next month. Top companies including drugmaker Eli Lilly & Co. and engine-maker Cummins Inc. have contributed $100,000 each to the campaign. And a recent fundraiser featuring Mary Cheney, the daughter of former Vice President Dick Cheney, who has been a vocal supporter of same-sex marriage, was sponsored by some of the state’s top GOP money men.

At least two lawmakers who voted for the amendment in 2011 have said they will oppose it next year. Senate Appropriations Chairman Luke Kenley, R-Noblesville, said last year that placing the ban in the constitution would not be a “productive” use of time for state lawmakers. And state Rep. Sean Eberhart, R-Shelbyville, told The Shelbyville News last month that he made a mistake in supporting the amendment last time and “to put that amendment in the constitution and to lock down generations with bigotry is wrong.”

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