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Putin pulls no punches

Defends anti-gay law, bashes ‘genderless and infertile’ West

Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a state-of-the-nation address at the Kremlin in Moscow, Thursday. AP Photo

Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a state-of-the-nation address at the Kremlin in Moscow, Thursday. AP Photo

MOSCOW — President Vladimir Putin cast Russia Thursday as a defender of conservative values against the “genderless and infertile” Western tolerance that he said equates good and evil.

Putin’s 70-minute state-of-the nation address marked a determined effort to burnish Russia’s image that has been dented by Western criticism of an anti-gay law which has stoked calls for a boycott of the Winter Olympics in Sochi, his pet project. Putin’s speech also contained a strong warning to those abroad who he claimed were seeking a military edge over Russia — a clear nod at the U.S. effort to develop long range non-nuclear weapons that Russia sees as a threat to its nuclear deterrent.

Russia has insisted that a law banning “propaganda of non-traditional relations” does not discriminate against gays, but gay rights group say it has given a green light to harassment and intimidation.

Without directly referring to the anti-gay law, Putin focused on upholding traditional family values, which he said were the foundation of Russia’s greatness and a bulwark against “so-called tolerance — genderless and infertile.”

Putin’s posture as a protector of conservative values and his scathing criticism of the West have been part of efforts to shore up his domestic support base of blue-collar workers, farmers and state employees against mounting criticism from the urban middle class. But his speech also was pitched to conservatives worldwide.

“Many countries today are reviewing moral norms and erasing national traditions and distinctions between nationalities and cultures,” Putin said. “The society is now required to demonstrate not only the sensible recognition of everyone’s right to freedom of conscience, political outlook and private life, but also the mandatory recognition of the equivalence of good and evil, no matter how odd that may seem.”

He argued that the “destruction of traditional values from the top” going on in other countries is “inherently undemocratic because it is based on abstract ideas and runs counter to the will of the majority of people.”

Without naming any specific country, he blasted “attempts to enforce allegedly more progressive development models” on other nations, saying they have led only to “decline, barbarity and big blood” in the Middle East and North Africa.

In an apparent jab at the U.S., Putin said that Russia is not “seeking a superpower status or trying to claim a global or regional hegemony ... not trying to patronize or teach anyone.”

Without naming the United States, Putin described the U.S. program of developing “prompt global strike” weapons as an attempt to tilt the strategic balance in its favor and vowed to counter it. The U.S. program envisages creating long-range non-nuclear weapons that could strike targets anywhere in the world in as little as an hour with deadly precision. Putin said that Russia sees the effort a threat to its nuclear deterrent and will take countermeasures.

“Expanding the potential of strategic non-nuclear precision weapons along with developing missile defense systems could nullify all earlier nuclear arms reduction agreements and upset the strategic balance,” Putin said. “Russia will respond to all those challenges, both political and technological. No one should have an illusion that it’s possible to achieve a military superiority over Russia.”

He boasted about the nation’s nuclear arsenal, saying that foreign powers will have to catch up with the level of new Russian nuclear weapons.

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