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Ticketing the texters

NY troopers in big SUVs peer in on texting drivers

  • An unmarked New York State Police SUV is seen in Mount Pleasant, N.Y., after a trooper pulled over another driver for distracted driving. Troopers are using a fleet of the tall SUVs as part of a crackdown on texting while driving. AP Photo

    An unmarked New York State Police SUV is seen in Mount Pleasant, N.Y., after a trooper pulled over another driver for distracted driving. Troopers are using a fleet of the tall SUVs as part of a crackdown on texting while driving. AP Photo

  • An unmarked New York State Police SUV is seen in Mount Pleasant, N.Y., on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013, after a trooper pulled over another driver for distracted driving. Troopers are using a fleet of the tall SUVs as part of a crackdown on texting while driving. (AP Photo/Jim Fitzgerald)

    An unmarked New York State Police SUV is seen in Mount Pleasant, N.Y., on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013, after a trooper pulled over another driver for distracted driving. Troopers are using a fleet of the tall SUVs as part of a crackdown on texting while driving. (AP Photo/Jim Fitzgerald)

  • An unmarked New York State Police SUV is seen in Mount Pleasant, N.Y., after a trooper pulled over another driver for distracted driving. Troopers are using a fleet of the tall SUVs as part of a crackdown on texting while driving. AP Photo
  • An unmarked New York State Police SUV is seen in Mount Pleasant, N.Y., on Thursday, Nov. 14, 2013, after a trooper pulled over another driver for distracted driving. Troopers are using a fleet of the tall SUVs as part of a crackdown on texting while driving. (AP Photo/Jim Fitzgerald)

MOUNT PLEASANT, N.Y. — Even for a state trooper, it’s not easy to spot drivers who are texting. Their smartphones are down on their laps, not at their ears. And they’re probably not moving their lips.

That’s why New York has given state police 32 tall, unmarked SUVs to better peer down at drivers’ hands, part of one of the nation’s most aggressive attacks on texting while driving that also includes steeper penalties.

“Look at that,” Trooper Clayton Howell says, pulling alongside a black BMW while patrolling the highways north of New York City. “This guy’s looking down. I can see his thumb on the phone. I think we got him.”

After a quick wail of the siren and a flash of the tucked-away flashers, an accountant from the suburbs is pulled over and politely given a ticket.

New York is among 41 states that ban text messaging for all drivers and is among only 12 that prohibit using hand-held cellphones. The state this year stiffened penalties for motorists caught using hand-held devices to talk or text, increasing penalty points on the driving record from three to five, along with tickets that carry fines of up to $200.

With the tough new penalties came tougher enforcement. In a two-month crackdown this summer, troopers handed out 5,553 tickets for texting while driving, compared to 924 in the same period last year.

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says that at any moment during daylight hours, 660,000 drivers in the United States are texting, using cellphones or otherwise manipulating electronic devices. It says more than 3,300 people were killed and 421,000 injured in crashes caused by distracted driving last year.

“You can see how oblivious they are to this vehicle,” Howell said as a woman holding a phone paid him no mind. “I’m right next to them, and they have no idea.”

The driver, a doctor, said she’d been running late and was on the phone to her office. It didn’t qualify as an emergency under the rules, but she got off with a warning.

“I tend to give people the benefit of the doubt,” Howell said. “It’s my philosophy to educate, and when you pull somebody over and give them a warning, that’s a pretty good education.”

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