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Nobel Peace Prize goes to chemical-weapons watchdog

  • Director General of  the OPCW,  Ahmet Uzumcu,  comments on the organization being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, during a press conference in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday Oct. 11, 2013. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has won this year's Nobel Peace Prize, it was announced on Friday. The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored the Hague, Netherlands-based global chemical watchdog "for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons." (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

    Director General of the OPCW, Ahmet Uzumcu, comments on the organization being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, during a press conference in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday Oct. 11, 2013. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has won this year's Nobel Peace Prize, it was announced on Friday. The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored the Hague, Netherlands-based global chemical watchdog "for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons." (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)

  • The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Thorbjorn Jagland, centre,  announces, the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize,  at the Nobel Institute,  in Oslo,  Friday Oct. 11, 2013. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has won this year's Nobel Peace Prize, it was announced on Friday. The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored the Hague, Netherlands-based global chemical watchdog "for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons."(AP Photo/ NTB Scanpix, Heiko Junge) NORWAY OUT

    The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Thorbjorn Jagland, centre, announces, the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize, at the Nobel Institute, in Oslo, Friday Oct. 11, 2013. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has won this year's Nobel Peace Prize, it was announced on Friday. The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored the Hague, Netherlands-based global chemical watchdog "for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons."(AP Photo/ NTB Scanpix, Heiko Junge) NORWAY OUT

  • FILE - In this Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013 citizen journalism file image provided by the United Media office of Arbeen, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, members of a chemical weapons investigation team take samples from sand near a part of a missile that is likely to be one of the chemical rockets, according to activists, in the Damascus countryside of Ain Terma, Syria. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, for working to eliminate the scourge that has haunted generations from World War I to the battlefields of Syria. (AP Photo/United Media office of Arbeen, File)

    FILE - In this Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013 citizen journalism file image provided by the United Media office of Arbeen, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, members of a chemical weapons investigation team take samples from sand near a part of a missile that is likely to be one of the chemical rockets, according to activists, in the Damascus countryside of Ain Terma, Syria. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, for working to eliminate the scourge that has haunted generations from World War I to the battlefields of Syria. (AP Photo/United Media office of Arbeen, File)

  • Director General of  the OPCW,  Ahmet Uzumcu,  comments on the organization being awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, during a press conference in The Hague, Netherlands, Friday Oct. 11, 2013. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has won this year's Nobel Peace Prize, it was announced on Friday. The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored the Hague, Netherlands-based global chemical watchdog "for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons." (AP Photo/Peter Dejong)
  • The chairman of the Norwegian Nobel Committee, Thorbjorn Jagland, centre,  announces, the winner of the Nobel Peace Prize,  at the Nobel Institute,  in Oslo,  Friday Oct. 11, 2013. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons has won this year's Nobel Peace Prize, it was announced on Friday. The Norwegian Nobel Committee honored the Hague, Netherlands-based global chemical watchdog "for its extensive efforts to eliminate chemical weapons."(AP Photo/ NTB Scanpix, Heiko Junge) NORWAY OUT
  • FILE - In this Wednesday, Aug. 28, 2013 citizen journalism file image provided by the United Media office of Arbeen, which has been authenticated based on its contents and other AP reporting, members of a chemical weapons investigation team take samples from sand near a part of a missile that is likely to be one of the chemical rockets, according to activists, in the Damascus countryside of Ain Terma, Syria. The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, for working to eliminate the scourge that has haunted generations from World War I to the battlefields of Syria. (AP Photo/United Media office of Arbeen, File)

BEIRUT — The watchdog agency working to eliminate the world’s chemical weapons won the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday in a powerful endorsement of the inspectors now on the ground in Syria on a perilous mission to destroy the regime’s stockpile of poison gas.

In honoring the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, the Norwegian Nobel Committee said “recent events in Syria, where chemical weapons have again been put to use, have underlined the need to enhance the efforts to do away with such weapons.”

The prize came 10 days after OPCW inspectors started arriving in war-torn Syria to oversee the dismantling of President Bashar Assad’s chemical arsenal.

While world leaders and former Nobel laureates praised the group’s selection, some in Syria lamented that the prize would do nothing to end the bloodshed, most of which is being inflicted with conventional weapons.

“The killing is continuing, the shelling is continuing and the dead continue to fall,” said Mohammed al-Tayeb, an activist who helped film casualties after the deadly chemical attack in August that the rebels and the government have blamed on each other.

The peace prize, he added, should have gone to “whoever helps the Syrian people get rid of Bashar Assad.”

After focusing on such themes as human rights and European unity in recent years, the Norwegian Nobel Committee this time returned to the core purpose of the 112-year-old Nobel Peace Prize — disarming the world.

Founded in 1997, the OPCW had largely worked out of the limelight until this year, when the United Nations called upon its expertise.

The OPCW’s selection caught many by surprise. It was widely expected that the peace prize would go to Malala Yousafzai, the 16-year-old Pakistani girl who was shot in the head by the Taliban last October for championing education for girls.

The peace prize committee has a tradition of not just honoring past achievements, but encouraging causes or movements that are still unfolding.

The OPCW was formed to enforce the Chemical Weapons Convention, the 1997 international treaty outlawing such arms. The Nobel Peace Prize came just days before Syria officially joins as OPCW’s 190th member state on Monday.

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