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Proposals, but no budget agreement

  • Republican senators, from left, Ted Cruz of Texas, John McCain of Arizona, David Vitter of Louisiana, and Richard Shelby of Alabama, walk in the rain back to their bus at the North Portico of the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, after they met with President Barack Obama regarding the government shutdown and debt ceiling. After weeks of ultimatums, President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and edged Washington to the verge of a historic, economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

    Republican senators, from left, Ted Cruz of Texas, John McCain of Arizona, David Vitter of Louisiana, and Richard Shelby of Alabama, walk in the rain back to their bus at the North Portico of the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, after they met with President Barack Obama regarding the government shutdown and debt ceiling. After weeks of ultimatums, President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and edged Washington to the verge of a historic, economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • President Barack Obama meets with small business owners about the government shutdown and debt ceiling, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

    President Barack Obama meets with small business owners about the government shutdown and debt ceiling, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., right, and Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., arrive with other Republican senators at the North Portico of the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, to meet with President Barack Obama regarding the government shutdown and debt ceiling. After weeks of ultimatums, President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and edged Washington to the verge of a historic, economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

    Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., right, and Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., arrive with other Republican senators at the North Portico of the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, to meet with President Barack Obama regarding the government shutdown and debt ceiling. After weeks of ultimatums, President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and edged Washington to the verge of a historic, economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)

  • In this photo from June 20, 2006, Josef Morvai and his son Daniel Morvai, 4, view the Statue of Liberty from a park bench in Red Hook Garden Pier, in Brooklyn, N.Y. As the federal shutdown continues, state and federal officials were discussing the possible reopening of the Statue of Liberty, while Arizona officials weighed whether to pay the federal government to reopen Grand Canyon National Park. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

    In this photo from June 20, 2006, Josef Morvai and his son Daniel Morvai, 4, view the Statue of Liberty from a park bench in Red Hook Garden Pier, in Brooklyn, N.Y. As the federal shutdown continues, state and federal officials were discussing the possible reopening of the Statue of Liberty, while Arizona officials weighed whether to pay the federal government to reopen Grand Canyon National Park. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)

  • House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va. walks to the House chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2103, for a vote. Republicans from the House of Representatives were offering to pass legislation to avert a potentially catastrophic default and end the 11-day partial government shutdown as part of a framework that would include cuts in benefit programs, officials said Friday. But the impasse was not yet over.    (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va. walks to the House chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2103, for a vote. Republicans from the House of Representatives were offering to pass legislation to avert a potentially catastrophic default and end the 11-day partial government shutdown as part of a framework that would include cuts in benefit programs, officials said Friday. But the impasse was not yet over. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

  • Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., shrugs as he talks to reporters about a two-hour meeting at the White House that he and other Senate Republicans had with President Barack Obama, trying to come up with a bipartisan solution to the budget stalemate, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Republicans from the House of Representatives are offering to pass legislation to avert a potentially catastrophic default and end the 11-day partial government shutdown as part of a framework that would include cuts in benefit programs, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

    Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., shrugs as he talks to reporters about a two-hour meeting at the White House that he and other Senate Republicans had with President Barack Obama, trying to come up with a bipartisan solution to the budget stalemate, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Republicans from the House of Representatives are offering to pass legislation to avert a potentially catastrophic default and end the 11-day partial government shutdown as part of a framework that would include cuts in benefit programs, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

  • House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013. President Barack Obama and Republicans in the House of Representatives are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and put Washington on the verge of an economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

    House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013. President Barack Obama and Republicans in the House of Representatives are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and put Washington on the verge of an economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

  • Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. gets on an elevator to leave Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, for a meeting with President Obama at the White House. After weeks of ultimatums, President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and edged Washington to the verge of a historic, economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

    Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. gets on an elevator to leave Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, for a meeting with President Obama at the White House. After weeks of ultimatums, President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and edged Washington to the verge of a historic, economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

  • Republican senators, from left, Ted Cruz of Texas, John McCain of Arizona, David Vitter of Louisiana, and Richard Shelby of Alabama, walk in the rain back to their bus at the North Portico of the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, after they met with President Barack Obama regarding the government shutdown and debt ceiling. After weeks of ultimatums, President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and edged Washington to the verge of a historic, economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)(AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  • President Barack Obama meets with small business owners about the government shutdown and debt ceiling, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  • Sen. Ron Johnson, R-Wis., right, and Sen. Jeff Sessions, R-Ala., arrive with other Republican senators at the North Portico of the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, to meet with President Barack Obama regarding the government shutdown and debt ceiling. After weeks of ultimatums, President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and edged Washington to the verge of a historic, economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/Charles Dharapak)
  • In this photo from June 20, 2006, Josef Morvai and his son Daniel Morvai, 4, view the Statue of Liberty from a park bench in Red Hook Garden Pier, in Brooklyn, N.Y. As the federal shutdown continues, state and federal officials were discussing the possible reopening of the Statue of Liberty, while Arizona officials weighed whether to pay the federal government to reopen Grand Canyon National Park. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews, File)
  • House Majority Leader Eric Cantor of Va. walks to the House chamber on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2103, for a vote. Republicans from the House of Representatives were offering to pass legislation to avert a potentially catastrophic default and end the 11-day partial government shutdown as part of a framework that would include cuts in benefit programs, officials said Friday. But the impasse was not yet over.    (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
  • Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn., shrugs as he talks to reporters about a two-hour meeting at the White House that he and other Senate Republicans had with President Barack Obama, trying to come up with a bipartisan solution to the budget stalemate, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, on Capitol Hill in Washington. Republicans from the House of Representatives are offering to pass legislation to avert a potentially catastrophic default and end the 11-day partial government shutdown as part of a framework that would include cuts in benefit programs, officials said Friday. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
  • House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio arrives on Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013. President Barack Obama and Republicans in the House of Representatives are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and put Washington on the verge of an economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)
  • Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. gets on an elevator to leave Capitol Hill in Washington, Friday, Oct. 11, 2013, for a meeting with President Obama at the White House. After weeks of ultimatums, President Barack Obama and congressional Republicans are exploring whether they can end a budget standoff that has triggered a partial government shutdown and edged Washington to the verge of a historic, economy-jarring federal default. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

WASHINGTON — With time running short, President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner accelerated efforts Friday to prevent the U.S. Treasury from default and end a partial government shutdown that stretched into an 11th day. The latest impacts: New aircraft grounded, military chaplains silenced and a crab harvest jeopardized in the Bering Sea.

“Let’s put this hysterical talk of default behind us and instead start talking about finding solutions,” said Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell of Kentucky.

Republicans in the House and Senate separately made proposals to the White House for ending an impasse that polls say has inflicted damage on their party politically.

Each offered to reopen the government and raise the $16.7 trillion debt limit — but only as part of broader approaches that envision deficit savings, changes to the health care law known as Obamacare and an easing of across-the-board spending cuts that the White House and Congress both dislike. The details and timing differed.

“We’re waiting to hear” from administration officials, said House Majority Leader Eric Cantor.

Hopes remained high on Wall Street, where investors sent the Dow Jones industrial average 111 points higher following Thursday’s 323-point surge.

In meetings with lawmakers over two days, Obama left open the possibility he would sign legislation repealing a medical device tax enacted as part of the health care law. Yet there was no indication he was willing to do so with a default looming and the government partially closed.

Obama called Boehner at midafternoon, and Michael Steel, a spokesman for the leader of House Republicans, said, “They agreed that we should all keep talking.”

Jay Carney, the president’s press secretary, said Obama “appreciates the constructive nature of the conversation and the proposal that House Republicans put forward. At yet, the spokesman said, “He has some concerns with it.”

In Congress, the man certain to be involved in any final agreement, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, gave no indication of his plans.

While the impact of the shutdown varies widely, lawmakers seemed to be taking care of their own needs.

The members-only House gym remained in operation, and enough Senate staff was at work to operate the aging underground tram that ferries senators and others from the Russell Office Building to the Capitol a short distance away.

The shutdown sent ripples nationwide. The aerospace industry reported that furloughs at the Federal Aviation Administration have resulted in a virtual stop to certification of new aircraft, equipment and training simulators.

The Senate passed legislation instructing the Pentagon to permit military chaplains to conduct worship services. House approval was still needed.

And Keith Colburn, a crab fisherman, told lawmakers during the day that a lucrative, one-month crab harvest set to begin Oct. 15 in the Bering Sea is in jeopardy because the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration is not assigning quotas to boats.

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