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Girl hoped to have been cured of HIV has relapsed

  • FILE - In this March 5, 2014 file photo, Dr. Audra Deveikis, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Miller Children's Hospital Long Beach, Calif., poses for a photo at an AIDS conference in Boston. Dr. Deveikis was involved in the treatment of a baby born with the AIDS virus. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that the Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Rodrique Ngowi, File)

    FILE - In this March 5, 2014 file photo, Dr. Audra Deveikis, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Miller Children's Hospital Long Beach, Calif., poses for a photo at an AIDS conference in Boston. Dr. Deveikis was involved in the treatment of a baby born with the AIDS virus. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that the Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Rodrique Ngowi, File)

  • FILE - In this March 5, 2014 file photo, Dr. Audra Deveikis, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Miller Children's Hospital Long Beach, Calif., poses for a photo at an AIDS conference in Boston. Dr. Deveikis was involved in the treatment of a baby born with the AIDS virus. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that the Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Rodrique Ngowi, File)

    FILE - In this March 5, 2014 file photo, Dr. Audra Deveikis, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Miller Children's Hospital Long Beach, Calif., poses for a photo at an AIDS conference in Boston. Dr. Deveikis was involved in the treatment of a baby born with the AIDS virus. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that the Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Rodrique Ngowi, File)

  • FILE - In this March 3, 2013 file image released by the University of Mississippi Medical Center shows Dr. Hannah Gay, a pediatric HIV specialist at the University of Mississippi. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/ University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jay Ferchaud, File)

    FILE - In this March 3, 2013 file image released by the University of Mississippi Medical Center shows Dr. Hannah Gay, a pediatric HIV specialist at the University of Mississippi. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/ University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jay Ferchaud, File)

  • FILE - In this March 3, 2013 file image released by the University of Mississippi Medical Center shows Dr. Hannah Gay, a pediatric HIV specialist at the University of Mississippi. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/ University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jay Ferchaud, File)

    FILE - In this March 3, 2013 file image released by the University of Mississippi Medical Center shows Dr. Hannah Gay, a pediatric HIV specialist at the University of Mississippi. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/ University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jay Ferchaud, File)

  • FILE - In this undated file image provided by Johns Hopkins Medicine in 2005 Dr. Deborah Persaud, a pediatric HIV expert at Johns Hopkins' Children's Center in Baltimore, holds a vial. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Johns Hopkins Medicine, File)

    FILE - In this undated file image provided by Johns Hopkins Medicine in 2005 Dr. Deborah Persaud, a pediatric HIV expert at Johns Hopkins' Children's Center in Baltimore, holds a vial. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Johns Hopkins Medicine, File)

  • FILE - In this undated file image provided by Johns Hopkins Medicine in 2005 Dr. Deborah Persaud, a pediatric HIV expert at Johns Hopkins' Children's Center in Baltimore, holds a vial. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Johns Hopkins Medicine, File)

    FILE - In this undated file image provided by Johns Hopkins Medicine in 2005 Dr. Deborah Persaud, a pediatric HIV expert at Johns Hopkins' Children's Center in Baltimore, holds a vial. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Johns Hopkins Medicine, File)

  • FILE - In this March 5, 2014 file photo, Dr. Audra Deveikis, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Miller Children's Hospital Long Beach, Calif., poses for a photo at an AIDS conference in Boston. Dr. Deveikis was involved in the treatment of a baby born with the AIDS virus. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that the Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Rodrique Ngowi, File)
  • FILE - In this March 5, 2014 file photo, Dr. Audra Deveikis, a pediatric infectious disease specialist at Miller Children's Hospital Long Beach, Calif., poses for a photo at an AIDS conference in Boston. Dr. Deveikis was involved in the treatment of a baby born with the AIDS virus. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that the Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Rodrique Ngowi, File)
  • FILE - In this March 3, 2013 file image released by the University of Mississippi Medical Center shows Dr. Hannah Gay, a pediatric HIV specialist at the University of Mississippi. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/ University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jay Ferchaud, File)
  • FILE - In this March 3, 2013 file image released by the University of Mississippi Medical Center shows Dr. Hannah Gay, a pediatric HIV specialist at the University of Mississippi. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/ University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jay Ferchaud, File)
  • FILE - In this undated file image provided by Johns Hopkins Medicine in 2005 Dr. Deborah Persaud, a pediatric HIV expert at Johns Hopkins' Children's Center in Baltimore, holds a vial. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Johns Hopkins Medicine, File)
  • FILE - In this undated file image provided by Johns Hopkins Medicine in 2005 Dr. Deborah Persaud, a pediatric HIV expert at Johns Hopkins' Children's Center in Baltimore, holds a vial. On Thursday, July 10, 2014, doctors and officials at the National Institutes of Health said new tests last week showed that a Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus is no longer in remission. The girl is now back on treatment and is responding well, doctors said. (AP Photo/Johns Hopkins Medicine, File)

A Mississippi girl born with the AIDS virus and in remission for more than two years despite stopping treatment now shows signs that she still harbors HIV — and therefore is not cured. The news is a setback to hopes that very early treatment with powerful HIV drugs might reverse an infection that has seemed permanent once it takes hold.

The girl is now nearly 4. As recently as March, doctors had said that she seemed free of HIV though she was not being treated with AIDS drugs. That was a medical first.

But on Thursday, doctors said they were surprised last week to find the virus in her blood, and there were signs that it was harming her immune system. She is now back on treatment and is responding well, they said.

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