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Mohawk students apply scientific method to life

  • Recorder/Paul Franz<br/>Mohawk students Colton Yezerski and  Sam Rode with their science fair project about music tempo and its effect on the human brain.

    Recorder/Paul Franz
    Mohawk students Colton Yezerski and Sam Rode with their science fair project about music tempo and its effect on the human brain.

  • Recorder/Paul Franz<br/>Mohawk Students Ashley Robertson and Kai Herzig with their science fair project tracking bacteria on various surfaces.

    Recorder/Paul Franz
    Mohawk Students Ashley Robertson and Kai Herzig with their science fair project tracking bacteria on various surfaces.

  • Recorder/Paul Franz<br/>Mohawk student Amar Abbatiello with his science fair project comparing longboard pucks.

    Recorder/Paul Franz
    Mohawk student Amar Abbatiello with his science fair project comparing longboard pucks.

  • Recorder/Paul Franz<br/>Mohawk students Colton Yezerski and  Sam Rode with their science fair project about music tempo and its effect on the human brain.
  • Recorder/Paul Franz<br/>Mohawk Students Ashley Robertson and Kai Herzig with their science fair project tracking bacteria on various surfaces.
  • Recorder/Paul Franz<br/>Mohawk student Amar Abbatiello with his science fair project comparing longboard pucks.

BUCKLAND — Memory, bacteria and the best materials for longboard pucks were among the subjects for 13 science projects in this year’s annual Mohawk Trail Regional School Science Fair.

Ninth-graders Sam Rode and Colton Yezerski took first place for “Music Tempo and its Effect on the Human Brain.” Their experiment measured how fast people moved without music, then tested whether music tempo affected their speed while walking or playing video games. They found the faster the music, the faster the motion.

Second place went to Amar Abbatiello for “Longboard Pucks,” in which he made and tested longboard pucks made of different materials, from plastic cutting boards to compressed paper, wood and metal. They were tested for durability and friction.

Third place went to KaiQi Herzig and Ashley Robertson for “Another Project on Bacteria: Scratching the Surface.”

Third place went to Jannelle O’Connell for “Whose Mouth is Cleaner.”

Taylor McCloud, Madison Roccio and Gabe Seaver took fourth place for “Effect of Vocabulary on Memory.”

And fifth place went to Kayla Baus, Kelsey Scranton and Sally Slowinski for “Stimulant Effects on Daphnia.”

Receiving honorable mention were: Zach Arfa (“Variations in Tone Deafness by Gender”), Dan Burke and Cam Olanyk (“Pedal Power), Cassie Kudlay (“Will Freezing Cookie Dough Affect Shelf Life”) and Rowan Steele-McCutchen for a study on the correlation between the American Gross Domestic Product and beliefs in climate change.

The exhibits are on display at Mohawk and can be seen there through today, said science teacher Theresa Dearborn.

This year’s fair features many entries from pre-Advanced Placement science students in the ninth grade. Pre-AP students are required to enter a competition, such as the traditional Science Fair; however, some have opted to compete in other science competitions this year, said science teacher Phil Lussier.

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