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Medical Marijuana

County gets 1 applicant for marijuana dispensary

Patriot Care Corp. is the only group to submit an application for a medical marijuana dispensary in Franklin County. The group is looking into Greenfield's American Legion building as a possible location.
Recorder/Micky Bedell

Patriot Care Corp. is the only group to submit an application for a medical marijuana dispensary in Franklin County. The group is looking into Greenfield's American Legion building as a possible location. Recorder/Micky Bedell Purchase photo reprints »

GREENFIELD — Patriot Care Corp. is one step closer to opening Franklin County’s first medical marijuana dispensary.

On Friday, four nonprofits submitted applications to run dispensaries in the seven counties without a dispensary applicant. Patriot Care is the only group to submit an application for Franklin County.

The nonprofit has proposed turning the American Legion building on Legion Avenue into a dispensary.

The group was invited to submit two applications. Its second proposed spot is Boston in Suffolk County. Cultivation would occur in South Hadley. It also has a provisional license to open a third dispensary in Lowell.

“We wait and see from here,” said Patriot Care Chief Executive and Director Robert Mayerson. “We spent a lot of time building support in Greenfield. We feel good about what we have. We’re looking forward to the next phase.”

The state expects to announce provisional licenses for open counties in October. Dispensaries elsewhere in the state have already been given provisional licenses in an earlier round of applications. Four local applicants were rejected in that round, although one of them, JM Farm’s Patient Group Inc., started by farmer James Pasiecnik of Whately, has sued the state over that denial.

Patriot Care was invited by the state to apply in Franklin County. It will be evaluated based on such factors as appropriateness of the site, geographical distribution of dispensaries, local support, and the applicant’s ability to meet the overall health needs of registered patients while ensuring public safety, according to Scott Zoback, spokesman for the state’s Medical Use of Marijuana Program. Applicants were asked to demonstrate local support and show that they can comply with all municipal rules, regulations, ordinances and bylaws.

The law allows the state to register up to 35 nonprofit registered marijuana dispensaries across the state, with at least one but no more than five dispensaries per county. In June, the state awarded 11 nonprofits provisional licenses to run dispensaries. Those applicants are moving into the inspection phase before opening.

You can reach Kathleen McKiernan at: kmckiernan@recorder.com or 413-772-0261, ext. 268 On Twitter, follow @RecorderKatMcK

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