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‘Brookie’ to be illuminated by fall

“Brookie, ” created by John Sendelbach, is a 10-foot-long sculpture made of spoons, forks, knives and other stainless-steel cutlery that has been on Deerfield Street in Greenfield since October 2013.
(Recorder file/Paul Franz)

“Brookie, ” created by John Sendelbach, is a 10-foot-long sculpture made of spoons, forks, knives and other stainless-steel cutlery that has been on Deerfield Street in Greenfield since October 2013. (Recorder file/Paul Franz) Purchase photo reprints »

GREENFIELD — The 10-foot-long fish sculpture made of spoons, forks, knives and other stainless-steel cutlery — known as “Brookie,” which has been sitting upon a 12-foot-tall pole on Deerfield Street since last October, will soon be illuminated at night so passersby can see it more clearly.

The Greening Gateway Sculpture Committee will add solar lighting, a few more plants and some signage in the town’s newest park so that people can enjoy the sculpture — which uses cutlery associated with the former J. Russell Cutlery site across the Green River to portray a brook trout — day and night.

“We have one bench installed there already and hope to have another at some point,” said committee Chairwoman Susan Worgaftik.

The bench is the same type as those the town has placed along Main Street and on the Town Common.

Worgaftik said an individual or group could buy and dedicate another one to someone if they wish. The 4-foot-long benches cost $570 each and are made of 100 percent recycled and splinter-free material.

She said Greenfield Local Cultural Council has awarded the project a $1,000 grant and the town, which spent $5,000 to award the artist John Sendelbach, 47, of Shelburne Falls a stipend, has promised another $5,000 to be used for signage and lighting. Sendelbach owns Metal Stone Arts in Shelburne Falls.

Worgaftik said the committee has not yet received estimates for lighting or sign costs.

She said the committee has planted some native grasses and shrubs on the former Food and Fuel site at 250 Deerfield St. and plans to plant a few more.

“They will all be short plants so that we don’t block Brookie,” she said.

She said signs will include history about the site, Brookie, the native plants there and the town’s historically significant cutlery manufacturing. Before the Civil War, J. Russell and Lamson & Goodnow of Shelburne Falls provided more than half of all the cutlery sold in the U.S.

Worgaftik said the committee is not digging any deeper than three feet when it plants or installs something — it is a Brownfields site, so it has been capped. By law, the committee couldn’t go deeper than that, even to install Brookie, she said.

Worgaftik said the next sculpture installation, which will be at a second gateway to Greenfield, is a secret for now.

“We’re not saying anything about it, because we’re going in a different direction,” she said.

“We’re not doing what everyone thinks, so we’re not even disclosing where the next gateway is.”

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