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Between the Rows

Between the Rows: ‘Give it a try’

  •  Photo by Pat Leuchtman<br/>E. x versicolor Sulphureum is hardy and successful in the shade, even in Heath.

    Photo by Pat Leuchtman
    E. x versicolor Sulphureum is hardy and successful in the shade, even in Heath.

  • Photo by Pat Leuchtman<br/>Epimedium Rubrum has thrived in my garden, planted beneath a ginkgo tree that provides shade for part of the day.

    Photo by Pat Leuchtman
    Epimedium Rubrum has thrived in my garden, planted beneath a ginkgo tree that provides shade for part of the day.

  •  Photo by Pat Leuchtman<br/>E. x versicolor Sulphureum is hardy and successful in the shade, even in Heath.
  • Photo by Pat Leuchtman<br/>Epimedium Rubrum has thrived in my garden, planted beneath a ginkgo tree that provides shade for part of the day.

Dry shade is a challenge in the garden, but epimediums and hellebores, two very different plants, both turn dry shade into an opportunity. For years I admired epimediums in other gardens, always asking the name of the beautiful low plant with heart-shaped leaves. Sometimes I got no answer, but even when I did I was incapable of remembering the word epimedium. I finally saw a pot of this plant at the Blue Meadow nursery in Montague and, out of the several varieties there, each with a nice little name tag, I bought Epimedium Rubrum. I chose this because it was listed as the most hardy. Even then I was afraid Heath was too cold, but a friend who was working there that day just shrugged and told me to give it a try.

“Give it a try” is always good advice. A plant in a pot is not much of a financial investment and we all must learn to endure disappointments and failed experiments if we are to have a happy life.

Epimedium Rubrum has thrived in my garden, planted beneath a ginkgo tree that provides shade for part of the day. I love the heart-shaped green leaves with their reddish border. The tiny pink flowers were a bit of a surprise. I had never actually seen an epimedium in early spring when it blooms. The delicate little flowers are best seen at eye level, which means not only down on hands and knees, but maybe even down on your stomach, chin in hands, to admire them at leisure.

I have given away bits of E. Rubrum to friends, assuring them that this easy-care plant will increase at a stately rate. It is not invasive. It is a native of Asia, but adapted to a well-behaved life in Zones 3 to 9, depending on the variety. I later learned that there are some very hardy varieties.

And there is variety. I bought my second epimedium, E. x versicolor Sulphureum, at the Bridge of Flowers plant sale a couple of years ago. The yellow flowers at the end of wiry stems are slightly larger so it is easier to see why epimediums are sometimes called bishop’s hats and fairy wings. It is less easy to see how anyone came to call it horny goat weed or rowdy lamb herb. Perhaps goats and lambs find it intoxicating, but I don’t know that for a fact.

Now I have two varieties of epimedium, but if you look at the Garden Vision (www.epimediums.com) or Plant Delights (www.plantdelights.com) catalogs you will see dozens of epimediums in many shades of lavender, purple, red, pink, white, orange and yellow. The flowers take many forms, including some that almost look like spiders, and the foliage varies as well. Not all the varieties have heart-shaped leaves, some are spiky and some are mottled.

Epimediums require very little care. The dying foliage should be cut down in the fall to clear the way for early spring growth.

Garden Vision nursery is located in Phillipston. It opens its nursery to viewing and sales the first two weekends in May.

Hellebores are another early bloomer that doesn’t mind dry shade. Right here I should say that any new plant should be kept adequately watered while it is settling in the first year, giving it time to let its roots grow enough to support the plant even when it is dry.

The term shade has many shades. Pun intended. There is dense shade like that under evergreens, there is high shade, a much weaker shade created by trees whose foliage begins up high, and dappled shade that dances dark and light. There is summer shade that is created when trees are fully leafed out, and the early spring sun can no longer shine through bare branches in the same way. But remember, some sun is usually needed for any flowering plant to actually bloom.

The Bridge of Flowers has a few hellebores, otherwise known as Christmas or Lenten roses, because they bloom early in the spring. I always think of them as having blossoms in shades of green, but some bloom in shades of white, pink and deep red. On the bridge, they get a lot of sun which shows you how tolerant they are of differing conditions. They can survive in the shade, but they need some sun to bloom well.

Hellebores have deep roots and they do not need dividing the way most perennials do. This means they should be planted in a soil deeply dug and well enriched with compost and aged manure.

They are quite trouble free and have a long bloom period. The dead flower stems should be cut back after blooming and the dying foliage can be cut down in the late fall.

Last year, I visited the Isabella Stewart Gardener Museum for the opening of the newly designed and planted Monk’s Garden. This small area is now a serene woodland underplanted with many hellebores as well as other groundcovers. Michael Van Valkenburg, the designer, said the place would be “crazy with hellebores” in the spring. I am planning to make another trip this spring and admire the craziness.

In the meantime, I’m waiting for the snow to leave so I can see my epimedium shoots and wonder where I might plant a hellebore.

Readers can leave comments at Pat Leuchtman’s Web site: www.commonweeder.com. Leuchtman has been writing and gardening in Heath at End of the Road Farm since 1980.

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