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Arts & Entertainment calendar: Oct. 10 through Oct. 16

  • Submitted photo<br/>Northhampton film festival’s local roots <br/>“Bridge of Names” will have its world premiere Saturday, at 2:10 p.m. at the Northampton International Film Festival. This film was shot entirely in the Pioneer Valley from 2006 to 2008. Co-director Liz Foley tells us that more than a 100 area residents worked on it, including people from Winterpills, the Lake Pleasant Spiritual Alliance, the South Amherst Congregational Church, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, the Montague Water Department, the People’s Pint and Baystate Franklin Medical Center. The movie was produced by Montague resident Marina Goldman. Area talent with principal acting roles include Bill Dwight, Court Dorsey, Jeannine Haas, Susanna Apgar and Lisa Enzer. “Bridge of Names,” says Foley, is a romantic adventure with a metaphysical twist. Searching for something to believe in, Steve, a lost punk rocker, meets a visionary preacher, Brother Wilf, in a strange little town in the woods. He falls in love with Agnes, Wilf’s beautiful (and underage) disciple.  Another film with a local connection is “The New Public,” which follows the first graduating class of a new small, public high school in Brooklyn, N.Y., through the “small victories and often crushing defeats” of the first four years of the school. One of its producers is Essie Chambers, who grew up in Greenfield and graduated from Greenfield High School. “The New Public” also screens Saturday, at 10:15 a.m. The festival runs Friday and Saturday. See “Films.”

    Submitted photo
    Northhampton film festival’s local roots
    “Bridge of Names” will have its world premiere Saturday, at 2:10 p.m. at the Northampton International Film Festival. This film was shot entirely in the Pioneer Valley from 2006 to 2008. Co-director Liz Foley tells us that more than a 100 area residents worked on it, including people from Winterpills, the Lake Pleasant Spiritual Alliance, the South Amherst Congregational Church, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, the Montague Water Department, the People’s Pint and Baystate Franklin Medical Center. The movie was produced by Montague resident Marina Goldman. Area talent with principal acting roles include Bill Dwight, Court Dorsey, Jeannine Haas, Susanna Apgar and Lisa Enzer. “Bridge of Names,” says Foley, is a romantic adventure with a metaphysical twist. Searching for something to believe in, Steve, a lost punk rocker, meets a visionary preacher, Brother Wilf, in a strange little town in the woods. He falls in love with Agnes, Wilf’s beautiful (and underage) disciple. Another film with a local connection is “The New Public,” which follows the first graduating class of a new small, public high school in Brooklyn, N.Y., through the “small victories and often crushing defeats” of the first four years of the school. One of its producers is Essie Chambers, who grew up in Greenfield and graduated from Greenfield High School. “The New Public” also screens Saturday, at 10:15 a.m. The festival runs Friday and Saturday. See “Films.”

  • PARADISE CITY ARTS FESTIVAL  at the Three County Fairgrounds, Route 9, Northampton. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.  Craft, art and sculptures by 275 juried exhibitors. Among the local artists with works in this show are Dick Muller and Dianne Muller, whose bag is pictured above. The festival continues Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Monday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $13 adults, $11 seniors, $8 students. Free parking. Special to this festival is “Hocus-Pocus!”which celebrates all that is mystical, magical, mysterious and make-believe say promoters, who urge attendees to discover secret compartments, masks, imaginary worlds, trompe-l’oeil, surrealism and fantasy creatures. Glass blower Philip Jacobs will do demonstrations. There will be food prepared by local chefs in the Festival Dining Tent and live music, including the Roger Salloom Band, New England Swing & Soul Orchestra and the Valley Jazz Divas.<br/>

    PARADISE CITY ARTS FESTIVAL at the Three County Fairgrounds, Route 9, Northampton. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Craft, art and sculptures by 275 juried exhibitors. Among the local artists with works in this show are Dick Muller and Dianne Muller, whose bag is pictured above. The festival continues Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Monday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $13 adults, $11 seniors, $8 students. Free parking. Special to this festival is “Hocus-Pocus!”which celebrates all that is mystical, magical, mysterious and make-believe say promoters, who urge attendees to discover secret compartments, masks, imaginary worlds, trompe-l’oeil, surrealism and fantasy creatures. Glass blower Philip Jacobs will do demonstrations. There will be food prepared by local chefs in the Festival Dining Tent and live music, including the Roger Salloom Band, New England Swing & Soul Orchestra and the Valley Jazz Divas.

  • Submitted photo<br/>Northhampton film festival’s local roots <br/>“Bridge of Names” will have its world premiere Saturday, at 2:10 p.m. at the Northampton International Film Festival. This film was shot entirely in the Pioneer Valley from 2006 to 2008. Co-director Liz Foley tells us that more than a 100 area residents worked on it, including people from Winterpills, the Lake Pleasant Spiritual Alliance, the South Amherst Congregational Church, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, the Montague Water Department, the People’s Pint and Baystate Franklin Medical Center. The movie was produced by Montague resident Marina Goldman. Area talent with principal acting roles include Bill Dwight, Court Dorsey, Jeannine Haas, Susanna Apgar and Lisa Enzer. “Bridge of Names,” says Foley, is a romantic adventure with a metaphysical twist. Searching for something to believe in, Steve, a lost punk rocker, meets a visionary preacher, Brother Wilf, in a strange little town in the woods. He falls in love with Agnes, Wilf’s beautiful (and underage) disciple.  Another film with a local connection is “The New Public,” which follows the first graduating class of a new small, public high school in Brooklyn, N.Y., through the “small victories and often crushing defeats” of the first four years of the school. One of its producers is Essie Chambers, who grew up in Greenfield and graduated from Greenfield High School. “The New Public” also screens Saturday, at 10:15 a.m. The festival runs Friday and Saturday. See “Films.”
  • PARADISE CITY ARTS FESTIVAL  at the Three County Fairgrounds, Route 9, Northampton. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.  Craft, art and sculptures by 275 juried exhibitors. Among the local artists with works in this show are Dick Muller and Dianne Muller, whose bag is pictured above. The festival continues Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Monday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $13 adults, $11 seniors, $8 students. Free parking. Special to this festival is “Hocus-Pocus!”which celebrates all that is mystical, magical, mysterious and make-believe say promoters, who urge attendees to discover secret compartments, masks, imaginary worlds, trompe-l’oeil, surrealism and fantasy creatures. Glass blower Philip Jacobs will do demonstrations. There will be food prepared by local chefs in the Festival Dining Tent and live music, including the Roger Salloom Band, New England Swing & Soul Orchestra and the Valley Jazz Divas.<br/>

Thursday 10

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Win $500 cash during Thursday Night Football, the more you watch at BTU, the more chances you have to win. NY Giants vs Chicago at 8:25 p.m. MLB playoffs and NFL on 14 HDTVs tonight. 863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: ∎ 7 p.m. For the Sake of the Song featuring John Colvert, Patrick Coman, The Rambling Kind and Salvation Alley String Band. $10, $13. www.iheg.com.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Bruins vs. Tampa Bay at 7 p.m. NFL Football Bills vs. Browns at 8 p.m. Watch 11 50-inch HDTV’s. Thirsty Thursdays & College night hosted by Big Dan in the Sports Bar. Beer Pong Tournament. Wear your college shirt or show your college I.D. to be entered in end-of-the-night prizes. 413-773-8313

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. the library’s meeting room will be open each Monday through Thursday for a Writer’s Lunch. This is a self-directed free writing time open to any writer who is looking for a place to work through lunch. Bring your own lunch and beverage. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details.

MILLERS FALLS LIBRARY, Millers Falls: Music and Movement for Young Children series with Laurie Davidson and Tom Carroll. Thursdays at 10 a.m. Through Dec 19. For more information, call 863-3214.

Literary

BOSWELL’S BOOKS, 10 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: Dan Cerow, author of “When the Dragon Wore the Crown.” When our ancestors gazed upon the skies thousands of years ago, they saw a huge dragon circling ceaselessly above them. Cerow takes us from 7000 BC to classical astronomy in 200 AD, following the mythology of various cultures as it evolves into modern astronomy. A question-and-answer period and book signing will follow. Free. 625-9362.

Music

THE WAGON WHEEL, Route 2, Gill: Pat & Tex LaMountain perform American standards, swing tunes, folk, rock, jazz, bluegrass and country. 7 to 9 p.m. They have been writing, performing and harmonizing together for almost 35 years. Their music has been described as “upbeat and rhythmic, inspirational and sensitive ... catchy ... with Pat & Tex there’s heart and soul.” Through the month of October, the Wagon Wheel will be featuring acoustic performances Thursday nights.

Potpourri

COLRAIN HISTORICAL SOCIETY MEETING: 7:30 p.m. The home of Joan McQuade, 7 Main Road, Colrain. Colrain sent some 176 men to the Civil War, most of them in the 52nd Mass. Infantry Regiment serving in Louisiana. Seventeen of them died. These men and their experience, especially that of Edwin Davenport, will be the subject of a presentation by Liz Sonnenberg. Potluck supper at 6 p.m.; business meeting and annual election of officers at 7. Members should bring a salad, entree, vegetable dish or dessert. Coffee and cider provided. Public invited. For more information, call 624-3453.

EZ TAI CHI for diabetics at Hart Yoga Studio, 1 Ashfield St., Shelburne Falls, just above Salmon Falls Showroom. 9 a.m. The gentle exercise of Tai Chi has been shown to help relieve stress, manage blood sugar, reduce blood pressure, improve muscle mass, elevate mood and increase immune function. You do not have to be sugar-challenged to benefit from this class. Thursday mornings from 9 to 9:45 a.m. Certified instructor Deborah Yaffee will lead. For more information, or to let Yaffee know you will attend the free talk, call her at 625-2800 or visit www.EZTaiChiForHealth.com.

THE NORTHFIELD FARMERS MARKET: 3 to 6 p.m. 105 Main St., in front of Northfield Coffee and Books. (New location). Vendors will offer a variety of vegetables and fruits, meat, eggs, baked goods, plants, crafts and more.

Theater

“DEATH OF A SALESMAN,” The Apron Theater Co. and the Next Stage Arts Project, Next Stage, 15 Kimball Hill, Putney, Vt. Thursday through Sunday and Oct. 17 through Oct. 19. Evening performances are at 8. The Sunday, Oct. 13, performance is a 2 p.m. matinee. “Death of A Salesman” follows the decline of Willy Loman — husband, father and traveling salesman. He is forced to confront his own failings and whether or not he is worth more to his family dead than alive. $10 general admission. Reservations are welcome, 802-387-0071.

Friday 11

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Friday night karaoke in the Sports Bar hosted by Dirty Johnny at 9 p.m. Dancing in The Extra Point Nightclub at 10 p.m. with DJ J-ill spinning tunes. No cover. 863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: ∎ 7 p.m. Heather Maloney. Sandy Bailey opens. $13, $15. ∎ 10 p.m. Alan Evans Trio. Freddy and the Yetis opens. $12, $14. www.iheg.com.

PEARL STREET BALLROOM, 10 Pearl St., Northampton: 9 p.m. SOJA. Aer opens. $17.50, $20. www.iheg.com.www.iheg.com.

ROUTE 63 ROADHOUSE, Route 63, Millers Falls: Josh LeVangie and the Mud, Blood & Beer Band, country and classic rock, 9 p.m. 659-3384.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, Main Street, Greenfield: Bruins vs. Detroit at 7 p.m. Friday night madness with Big Dan in the sports bar. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. 773-8313.

Coffeehouse

GREAT FALLS COFFEEHOUSE, Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls: 7 to 9 p.m. Martin Swinger performs. Promoters tell us he is a lively singer-songwriter whose music spans autism, oysters, dyslexic theology, Betty Boop and Buddha with performance panache and ingenious songs that are surprising, intimate, outrageous and true. Stephanie Marshall of The Boxcar Lilies will open. $6 to $13. Children free. 863-3221, www.greatfallsdiscoverycenter.org.

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: Glenn Roth, guitarist. A literal “underground” sensation, Roth is a licensed performer in the MTA “Music under New York” program, playing for the most distracted and demanding audience in the world: legions of workers rushing to jobs throughout the Big Apple, say promoters. Also, Kristen Graves, folk/pop singer and songwriter with a voice that commands attention, lyrics that catch your heart, and melodies that stay with the listener long after the evening ends, say promoters. Free. Please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Dance

AMHERST INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: Every Friday night, 7:30 to 10 p.m. Bangs Community Center, Boltwood Walk, Amherst Center. Dances from the Balkans, Middle Eastern Europe, more. You need not bring a partner. Live music first Fridays of the month. Some teaching. Beginners welcome. Donation. 549-6748. www.amherstfolkdancing.org.

GUIDING STAR GRANGE, 401 Chapman St., Greenfield: Contra dancing for all. 8 to 11 p.m. All welcome. Partners, special costumery and dance experience aren’t required. A core of enthusiastic experienced dancers helps sweep newcomers into the spirit and fun. David Kaynor teaches and calls the contras and leads the David Kaynor and Friends ensemble. Admission is in the form of self-determined, free-will contributions (a.k.a. The Honor System) with $10 or barter equivalent suggested. www.guidingstargrange.org

Fairs & Festivals

RIVERSIDE BLUES & BBQ at Beacon Field, off High Street, Greenfield. Competitors arrive today. On Saturday and Sunday: blues music, New England Barbecue Society grilling contest, Kansas City Barbeque Society contest, beer sampling, crafters, vendors and children’s activities. See Saturday’s listing. Also, see our cover story, Page D1.

Films

THE NORTHAMPTON INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL, Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Academy of Music Theatre, 274 Main St., Northampton. A showcase of films from around the world, chosen by a panel of film industry experts. Additional events will include: a gala at R. Michelson Galleries following the opening night feature film, discussion panels with filmmakers and a closing awards ceremony. Full Access Festival Pass, $100, seniors/students/WGBY members, $75. Friday Film Day Pass, $50, seniors/students/WGBY members, $35. Saturday or Sunday Film Day Pass, $30, seniors/students/WGBY members/groups of 10 or more, $25. Individual tickets also available. Academy of Music Box Office, Tuesday through Friday, 3 to 6 p.m., 413-584-9032 ext.105, http://academyofmusictheatre.tix.com.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Mother Goose on the Loose. Happy circle with Kay Lyons at a lap sit story hour for children ages 3 and under. Rhymes, songs and movement games. 11 a.m. ∎ Writers’ Workshop. Noon to 2 p.m. Fridays. Jane Buchanan and Joannah Whitney lead the program, which includes writing exercises and discussion and an opportunity to share what has been written. Participants encouraged to attend the open writing periods during the week as well. No charge and registration not required. Contact Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details. ■ Open for Business. 2 p.m. Reliable WiFi and a quiet workspace in the LeVanway Meeting Room Mondays and Fridays from 2 to 5 p.m.

Music

BLANCHE MOYSE MEMORIAL CONCERT presented at the Bellows Falls Opera House, Bellows Falls, Vt. The Blanche Moyse Chorale will perform J.S. Bach’s choral music. This year’s selection is the “Christmas Oratorio.” The Chorale and vocal soloists will be supported by the Blanche Moyse Memorial Orchestra, a baroque ensemble consisting largely of New England Bach Festival veterans. Advance tickets $20 general, $40 preferred seating; $22 and $45 at the door; all students $5. Tickets available at the Brattleboro Music Center at 802-257-4523 or online at brattleborotix.com/boxoffice or bmcvt.org. Concert repeats Sunday at Marlboro College’s Persons Auditorium, Marlboro, Vt.

MANHAN CAFE, 88 Cottage St., Easthampton. 6 to 8 p.m. Bruce King performs an eclectic mix of tunes written by western Massachusetts songwriters as well as songs from the contemporary folk and blues genres. Christopher Griffin, a longtime Pioneer Valley musician and singer-songwriter, brings a variety of styles and stories along with him when he and his guitars perform original compositions. Linda O’Neill, a member of the traditional Irish music duo “The Old Bog Road,” also performs. Free.

MO JAZZ REMIX Jazz Series continues. 8 to 10 p.m. Memorial Hall, 4 West Main St., Wilmington, Vt. Pianist Christopher Bakriges will be joined by drummer Marcel Smith, bassist Rich Mollin and saxophonist James “Ace” Leonard to commemorate the Wilmington’s Mo Jazz Cafe in the late 1990s. Admission by donation. Refreshments, wine and beer available. 802-464-8557.

MONTAGUE BOOK MILL, 440 Greenfield Road, Montague: Ephemeral String Band and Walnut Street Band. The Walnut Street Band is an all-female trio with angelic harmonies with an old time/bluegrass feel, say promoters, who add that Leah, Kristie and Colby combine the sounds of guitar, banjo and cello with their interweaving voices to create beautiful, haunting folk music covers. The Ephemeral Stringband draws from several branches of traditional American music including Oldtime Stringband music. Early country and bluegrass and Shape Note sacred hymns. They combine skillful instrumental playing with close harmony singing, creating a sound that grounded in the past, while creating new material to add to the living tradition of American music, say promoters. $5 to $8 sliding scale. 367-9206.

THE UNIVERSITY ORCHESTRA presents “A Little Russian Program” with music by Glinka: Ruslan and Ludmila Overture; Elgar: Serenade for Strings and Prokofiev: Symphony No. 7 in C-sharp minor. 8 p.m. Fine Arts Center Concert Hall, UMass-Amherst. $3 UMass students; $5 other students, children, seniors; $10 general public. Free for UMass music majors and minors. For tickets: 545-2511, fac.umass.edu/musicanddance.

Potpourri

DOMINICAN NUN SISTER SHEILA FLYNN, founder of the Kopanang Community in South Africa, will give a presentation about the Kopanang Creation Canticle at the Mariposa Museum & World Culture Center, 26 Main St., Peterborough, N.H. This textile exhibit, consisting of 52 exquisitely embroidered tapestries depicting the unfolding story of the universe created by the Kopanang community, has been the focal point of the Mariposa’s year-long exploration of Sacred Geography, say organizers. 603-924-4555, pr@mariposamuseum.org.

THE HARLEM WIZARDS vs. the Northfield Mount Hermon Chase Your Dream Team (NMH faculty and students) play in a fundraising basketball game. 7 p.m. Forslund Gym at Northfield Mount Hermon School, Gill. $10 advance, $12 day of game. To benefit the Jill E. Harrington Hanzalik Memorial Fund. To order tickets, go to www.harlemwizards.com. Two court side Celtics tickets to be raffled off at the game.

SMITH COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART Free Second Friday. 4 to 6 p.m., Hands on! art-making for ages 4 and older with adult. While supplies last. 6 to 6:30 p.m., Open Eyes: An informal guided gallery conversation about an art object. Light refreshments. Museum shop open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Elm Street at Bedford Terrace, Northampton. 585-2760, www.smith.edu/artmuseum.

Theater

10-MINUTE PLAY FESTIVAL at Actors Theatre Playhouse, Brook and Main streets, West Chesterfield, N.H.. 7:30 p.m. Continues Fridays and Saturdays through Oct. 12. Anything can happen in 10 minutes and it usually does. Comic, tragic and uplifting life-changing upheavals that occur every 10 minutes. “Ten Minute Plays” capture pivotal moments. They challenge the playwright, the director, and the actors to make it all happen now, the way it does in real life. There is no time for long background exposition or the slow teasing out of emotional undercurrents. All seats $8. 603-256-8070.

e_SDLqA VERY BRADY 70’s SHOW!” presented by New England Youth Theatre. 100 Flat St., Brattleboro, Vt. 7 p.m. Continues Fridays and Saturdays at 7 p.m.; 2 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays through Oct. 20. A theatrical walk down memory lane, each performance pays homage to three episodes of the show that changed television in the 1970s and is still playing around the world. Complete with a trivia contest that will result in only the grooviest prizes, this house experience will make you remember what it is to “not play ball in the house,” say promoters. Tickets: $9 for students, $11 for seniors, $13 for adults. 802-246-6398. www.neyt.org.

“DEATH OF A SALESMAN” continues. See Thursday’s listing.

Saturday 12

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, Turners Falls: MLB playoffs and college football on 14 HDTVs, live music in the sports bar at 8 p.m. with Chuck & Biscuits aka Chuck and Danny from Jimmy Just Quit. Dancing in the Extra Point Nightclub with DJ Drew spinning hits at 10 p.m. No cover. College football Saturday at BTU, all the games featuring. 863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton. ∎ 7 and 10 p.m. The Sweet Remains and Will Evans of Barefoot Truth. $12.50, $15. www.iheg.com.

ROUTE 63 ROADHOUSE, Route 63, Millers Falls: AfterGlo, current and classic rock, 9:30 p.m. 659-3384.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St.. Saturday night madness with Tyler downstairs in Taylor’s Tavern. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. 773-8313

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: Alan Williams of Birdsong at Morning and Don Sparks. 7:30 p.m. The music of Birdsong at Morning, with its themes of self-discovery and reinvention, is initiated by Williams, a man with a few reinventions of his own, say promoters, who add that Sparks is popular songwriter and an American actor who has worked extensively in theatre, television and film. Free; please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Dance

GENDER ROLE FREE CONTRA, Montague Common Hall, 34 Main St., Montague. 7 to 10 p.m. Caller Chris Riccioti. Band to be determined. $7 to $10 sliding scale, $5 with student ID. All dances smoke- drug- and alcohol-free. Please refrain from wearing perfumes, colognes and other highly scented products. Bring soft-soled shoes to protect the wooden dance floor.

MONADNOCK TRI-STATE DANCE CLUB at Elmm Hall, Durkee Street, Winchester, N.H. 7 to 11 p.m. Music by Yvonne and the Reverbs.

MONADNOCK SQUARES dance at the Recreation Center, 312 Washington St., Keene, N.H. 8 to 10:30 p.m. Bob Butler caller; Bernie Porter, cuer. monadnocksquares@hotmail.com.

SECOND SATURDAY CONTRA DANCE, Guiding Star Grange, 401 Chapman St., Greenfield. 8 to 11:30 p.m. Crabapples with Jean Gorrindo calling. This is the band’s first time at the Guiding Star Grange, $10. www.guidingstargrange.org

Fairs & Festivals

ASHFIELD FALL FESTIVAL: Up and down Ashfield’s Main Street. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. More than 50 arts and craft exhibits, locally prepared foods, activities for children, pumpkin games, music, Morris dancers, book and tag sales and the annual tallest sunflower and heaviest pumpkin competitions. Free admission. Please leave dogs at home. Continues Sunday. www.ashfieldfallfestival.org.

PARADISE CITY ARTS FESTIVAL at the Three County Fairgrounds, Route 9, Northampton. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Craft, art and sculptures by 275 juried exhibitors. Continues Sunday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Monday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. $13 adults, $11 seniors, $8 students. Free parking. Special to this festival is “Hocus-Pocus!”which celebrates all that is mystical, magical, mysterious and make-believe say promoters, who urge attendees to discover secret compartments, masks, imaginary worlds, trompe-l’oeil, surrealism and fantasy creatures. Glass blower Philip Jacobs will do demonstrations. There will be food prepared by local chefs in the Festival Dining Tent and live music, including the Roger Salloom Band, New England Swing & Soul Orchestra and the Valley Jazz Divas.

PARISH FAIR in St. Mary’s Parish Center, West Myrtle and Cheney streets, Orange. 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Food, hand-made crafts, bargains, raffles. Home-made pies, candy, fudge, jellies, cookies and cakes. Beef stew lunch.

RIVERSIDE BLUES & BBQ FESTVIAL at Beacon Field, off High Street, Greenfield. Noon to 6 p.m. BBQ sampling noon until the food runs out. Today: chicken wings. $5 for six tickets for sample size portions from competing BBQ teams. Brewfest beer sampling saloon 1 to 5 p.m. $20 for all the beer samples you can legally handle. Festival admission $5; 10 and under free with paying adult. Continues Sunday. See our cover story, Page D1.

Films

THE NORTHAMPTON INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL continues. See Friday’s listing.

Music

CALVIN THEATER, 19 King St., Northampton: An Evening with Bonnie “Prince Billy.” 8 p.m. $25, $30. www.iheg.com.

MONTAGUE BOOK MILL, 440 Greenfield Road, Montague. 8 p.m. Home Body, an artful electro-pop duo based in the Pioneer Valley; Wet, a pop music band from Brooklyn, and Mal Devisa, the solo project of Who’da Funk It’s Deja Carr. $6 to $10 sliding scale. 367-9206, www.montaguebookmill.com.

MUSIC IN DEERFIELD presents the Horszowski Trio performing works by Joseph Haydn, Antonin Dvorak and John Harbison. 8 p.m. Sweeney Concert Hall, Smith College, Northampton. Concert Conversations featuring the artists discussing the program with New England Public Radio’s John Montanari, precedes the concert at 7 p.m. in nearby Earle Recital Hall. Tickets in advance, $28 adults, $5 students under 18, $10 for accompanying adults and students 18 and older. At the door: $32, $5, $10. Handicapped accessible. For tickets, call 774-4200, www.musicindeerfield.org.

Potpourri

ANNUAL PIE SALE, 9 to 11 a.m. (or, until the pies sell out), in front of the Keystone Market on Bridge Street in Shelburne Falls. Presented by the Shelburne Falls Area Women’s Club to benefit its Scholarship Fund, which benefits local students. 413-625-6249

ASHFIELD FARMERS MARKET on Ashfield Town Common. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 21 vendors offering a variety of locally grown and locally made farm products. Annual and perennial plants, vegetable starts, organic eggs, mixed greens, flowers, honey, maple syrup, pork, beef, elixirs, full selection of vegetables, hard cider, mead, bread, pastries and coffee. Turkish prepared food, apples, peaches, blueberries and weekly musical entertainment. 625-6365. Every Saturday through October.

CHEAP ART SHOW at the Polish American Club, South Deerfield. 4 to 7 p.m. This exhibit is based on the Bread and Puppet Cheap Art Manifesto: “Art is FOOD. You can’t eat it but it FEEDS you. Art has to be CHEAP and available to EVERYBODY.” The aim of this special one-day show is to make art affordable and showcase the vast local talent in Deerfield and surrounding towns.

FALL FOLIAGE ART STUDIO TOUR. 25 artists in furniture, wood turning, glass, pottery, jewelry, fiber, photography, sculpture, painting and works on paper open their doors in 19 locations from Antrim, Stoddard and Nelson to Spofford, Keene, Swanzey, Rindge and new Ipswich, N.H. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, go to www.fallfoliageartstudiotour.com.

FALL FOLIAGE HIKE to Rose Ledges led by Northfield Mountain Recreation and Environmental Center naturalist Kim Noyes. 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Explore historic 19th century stone quarries and look for signs of local wildlife. Hikers should bring lunch, water, dress in layers, wear sturdy footwear and be comfortable hiking over somewhat hilly terrain with an elevation gain of 800 feet. Inclement weather cancels. Free for ages 10 and older. To register, call 800-859-2960.

GREAT FALLS DISCOVERY CENTER, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Watershed Investigators: Beavers. 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Monthly kid-oriented program that focuses on hands-on discovery of local nature. Join refuge staff as they explore different ways to look at the natural world around us. Methods of discovery may include crafts, games, stories and exploration. Geared towards grades 2 to 5, all welcome. 863-3221, www.greatfallsdiscoverycenter.org.

GREENFIELD FARMERS MARKET at Court Square, Greenfield. 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 25 vendors offering a variety of locally grown and produced farm products and locally made crafts. Starter vegetable plants hanging baskets, perennial and annual flower plants, herb plants and culinary herbs, mixed greens, baby spinach, microgreens, honey, maple syrup, homemade jams, fresh-baked breads, cookies, grass-fed lamb, beef, goat and pork, locally raised poultry and, new this year, sustainable Cape Cod fish and more. Check the website at www.greenfieldfarmersmarket.com for vendors, entertainment and events at the market. Every Saturday through fall.

THE HAPPIER VALLEY COMEDY SHOW, The Ha Ha’s & Hidden Falls. The Arts Block, 289 Main St., Greenfield. 8 p.m. For the second act, Hidden Falls will present a fully improvised musical, with actors who will create the crazy, singing and dancing town of Hidden Falls, based on audience input at the top of each show, say promoters, who add that performers will discover the people who make up the town, and the dreams and desires that make up those people, presenting it for one night only in a full, musical production (complete with their own band) “that will knock your socks clear off your feet.” PG-13. Handicapped-accessible. www.happiervalley.com. Tickets, $13 at the door or $10 in advance. http://theartsblock.com/

HILLTOWN HOUNDS AGILITY CLUB of Conway presents its annual Canine Performance Events sponsored dog agility competition. 8 a.m. Roaring Brook Farm, 1940 Roaring Brook Road, off Whately Road, Conway. Indoors in a horse arena. Watch more than 60 handlers and their dogs test their skills and try to beat the clock to earn titles and ribbons while jumping hurdles and tires, running through chutes and tunnels, climbing A frames and dog walks, riding see-saws and weaving through poles. Free. Food vendor on site. Bring your own chairs. Park in the field behind the barn. 774-6521, www.hilltownhounds.com. Repeats Sunday.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD ANTIQUES SHOW at Deerfield Academy. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Antiques Dealers’ Association of America will bring together 50 of the nation’s dealers. On view and for sale are objects from the 17th through 19th centuries A highlight for 2013 will be a new exhibition titled “Furniture Masterworks: Tradition and Innovation in Western Massachusetts.” A festive reception will take place following the show today at The Wright House. Admission $12 (free for members of Historic Deerfield) and includes entrance to the Flynt Center of Early New England Life and the Apprentice’s Workshop at Dwight House. For information on the Saturday evening reception and to make reservations, call 775-7179 or events@historic-deerfield.org. Repeats Sunday 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.

LEFTY’S BREWING CO, 301 Wells St., Greenfield. ∎ Weekly brewery tour. 2 to 4 p.m., Free to those 21 and over. 475-3449, www.leftysbrew.com.

MIKE’S MAZE at Warner Farm, 23 South Main St., Sunderland. Open Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. through Nov. 3. The 14th annual maze design is a mind-bending half-tone pattern of corn stalks and bare ground that create an 8-acre visage of surrealist painter Salvador Dali, say organizers, who add that visitors will be perplexed by illusions in this year’s game and baffled by distorted imagery in the newly constructed Ames Room and Mirror Room. Instead of winding through trails, mazegoers will move between disorienting areas of open space and dense plantings of corn as they search for hidden game stations. Two pumpkin-launching trebuchets and a giant slingshot will join the potato cannon and provide amusement for kids of all ages. Corn Cafe open for lunch and snacks. Admission $8 for ages 4 to 12, $10 for adults; $1 discounts to students and seniors. 3 and under free. Schools and other groups can arrange to visit on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays. Call the farm at 665-8331 and leave a message.

PIONEER JUNIOR WOMEN’S CLUB’S presents the Fifth Anniversary Millers River Challenge Canoe and Kayak Races featuring the High School Cup. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Riverfront Park Boathouse, 25 East River St., Orange. There will be races for area youth, mixed teams of adults and children and adults. There are different classes and race lengths available to enter. The race is a part of the New England Canoes & Kayak Racing Association Point Series.

SHELBURNE FALLS TROLLEY MUSEUM in Shelburne Falls will celebrate Trolleyfest 2013 with a barn-raising fundraiser on behalf of the new car barn for the trolley. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., the museum grounds will offer music by Burrie Jenkins, cider pressing, rides on the trolley and the wooden caboose, railroad movies and unveiling of a unique example of box car art executed by Caleb Neelon, internationally known public artist. Evening festivities at the Eagles Club on State Street beginning at 5:30 p.m. with a cash bar. Buffet meal at 6:30 p.m. Raffles for local gift certificates, antique brass trolley bell, copper trolley art, dinner train tickets on the Cape Cod Central and more. Dinner $21.50 adults; $10 children 5 to 10 years old, under 5 free. Reservations available at the Trolley Museum, and at Nancy Dole Books. Raffle tickets available at the Trolley Museum and Nancy Dole Books and throughout the day at Trolleyfest.

TEDX TALKS, Memorial Hall, 51 Bridge St. Shelburne Falls. A Sense of Place conference. What place are you from? What defines a place? 13 area speakers. Noon to 6:30 p.m. $41 or free simulcast on the Internet starting at noon. Local ideas worth spreading. Also, Pre/post Adventures: expeditionary visits to sites in the greater Shelburne Falls area that take place before the noon start. TEDxShelburneFalls.com for tickets, or phone 800-838-3006,

WARWICK ART SHOW AND SALE presented by the Warwick Arts Council. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Warwick Town Hall, Route 78, Warwick. Area residents from professional, highly-trained artists to amateur, occasional dabblers, submit up to three art pieces to be displayed. A big part of the concept of this show is to encourage as many residents as possible to display work they’ve created. Ongoing wide-screen TV showing of three short art-related films by Warwick’s Doc Pruyne and Cheri Robartes. Continues Sunday 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.’

Theater

“10-MINUTE PLAY FESTIVAL” concludes. See Friday’s listing.

“A VERY BRADY 70S SHOW” continues. See Friday’s listing.

“DEATH OF A SALESMAN” continues. See Thursday’s listing.

“OTHELLO” from the London stage of Britain’s National Theatre shown at 1 p.m. at Amherst Cinema, 28 Amityh St., Amherst. This major new production, set in contemporary times, opens the 2013-14 NT live season. Plays are cpatured live in HD from the acclaimed National Theatre and broadcast to selected cinemas around the globe. Tickets $24 general admission. Call the Amherst Cinema box office or www.amherstcinema.org. Repeats Oct. 28.

Sunday 13

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. NFL Sunday Ticket at BTU. Patriots vs. Saints at 4:25 p.m. plus every game starting at noon. Munchie bar, BTU wheel, Pats Cash, prizes and giveaways after each quarter and drink specials. Breast Cancer fundraiser 33 ounce Beck’s Oktoberfest mug available. MLB playoffs on the TVs today. 863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: 7 p.m. Mikey Sweet and The Holy Ghost. Mother Elk opens. $10, $13. www.iheg.com.

THE MONTAGUE INN, Route 63, Montague: Free Pool Sunday. 768-7336.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. NFL Sunday Ticket is on at Taylor’s. Patriots vs. Saints at 4 p.m. Watch all your favorite teams on 11 50-inch HDTVs with Kathy in the Sports Bar opening at noon and Erinn downstairs in the Tavern. Free pool all night with Big Dan in the sports Bar. 773-8313.

WEST DOVER INN, Route 100, West Dover, Vt.: Kevin Parry plays music from 1 to 4 p.m. on the patio.

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: 2:30 p.m. Jesse Hanson, multi-instrumentalist singer-songwriter from the Boston area. Before doodling songs, she has trained her whole conscious life to be a well-developed violinist, say promoters, who add that she has also been exposed to Celtic and bluegrass music her whole life and has placed in every regional competition she has competed in. Free; please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Dance

CONTRAEVOLUTION, Guiding Star Grange, 401 Chapman St., Greenfield. A special nine-hour techno/crossover dance. 2 to 11:30 p.m. The Gaslight Tinkers with Susan Petrick (California), Perpetual e-Motion with Kim Roberts (Maine), and Firecloud (techno contra) with Lisa Greenleaf (Massachusetts). Read more about the bands and the event at http://amherstcontra.org. $32 (full-time students $25); advance tickets available from BrownPaperTickets.com; tickets at the door may be limited. http://www.guidingstargrange.org

Fairs & Festivals

ASHFIELD FALL FESTIVAL concludes. See Saturday’s listing.

PARADISE CITY ARTS FESTIVAL continues. See Saturday’s listing.

Films

THE NORTHAMPTON INTERNATIONAL FILM FESTIVAL concludes. See Friday’s listing.

Music

RACHEL BROTMAN WITH PAINT, The Arts Block, 289 Main St., Greenfield. Noon. 5-piece group based in Brooklyn what says it draws influence from Erykah Badu to Nina Simone to Radiohead amidst a shared background in jazz and improvisation. $7 in advance, $10 at the door. http://theartsblock.com/ www.rachelbrotman.com.

BLANCHE MOYSE ANNUAL MEMORIAL CONCERT repeats in Marlboro, Vt. See Friday’s listing.

THE BRICK CHURCH Music Series presents its first concert of the season. 3 p.m. The First Church of Deerfield, 71 Old Main St., Deerfield. Emsemble Schumann with Sally Pinkas, piano, Steve Larson, viola, and Tom Gallant, oboe. Acclaimed solo and chamber music artists will play works by Robert Kahn, Saint-Saens, Max Bruch, Hermann Reutter, and Mozart. $10 suggested donation at the door. Reception will follow the concert. This is a fundraiser for the church. For more information, call Jean Pitman Turner at 774-2657. See Joseph Marcello’s Encores & Curtain Calls column Page D5.

Potpourri

HILLTOWN HOUNDS AGILITY CLUB of Conway Canine Performance Events concludes. See Saturday’s listing.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD ANTIQUES SHOW concludes. See Saturday’s listing.

MIKE’S MAZE continues. See Saturday’s listing.

RIVERSIDE BLUES & BBQ concludes. Today’s sampling: pulled pork. See Friday and Saturday’s listings.

WARWICK ART SHOW AND SALE concludes. See Saturday’s listing.

WILDER HOMESTEAD, 129 Route 112, Buckland will present sample activities from the Colonial era. 2 to 5 p.m. Open hearth cooking, oxen, basket making, weaving, spinning, quilting, chair caning, shoe making demonstrations, music of the 1700s, cider pressing, Morris Dancers. $3 adults, $1 children. Presented by the Buckland Historical Society.

Theater

“A VERY BRADY 70S SHOW” continues. See Friday’s listing.

“DEATH OF A SALESMAN” continues. See Thursday’s listing.

Monday 14

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Monday Night Football. Colts vs Chargers at 8:30 p.m. on 14 HDTVs. Win a Corona Cooler, the same one as in the commercials. One entry with each Corona purchase. 863-2882.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. NFL Football, Colts vs. Chargers at 8:30 p.m. 11 50-inch HDTVs. Free pool all night in the sports bar. Country music with Host Kathy and her candy bowl. Monday Madness with Big Dan in the Sports Bar.773-8313.

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls. ∎ 2 p.m. David & Lonnie Chu. Guitarist David and singer Lonnie are founders of Puente Flamenco, the only flamenco troupe in upstate New York. Free; please tip the musicans. ∎ 8:30 p.m. Monday Night Football featuring Indianapolis Colts at San Diego Chargers. Free admission; please tip the bartenders. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com..

Fairs & Festivals

PARADISE CITY ARTS FESTIVAL concludes. See Saturday’s listing.

Tuesday 15

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Two free games of pool with each pitcher of beer. Watch MLB playoffs on 14 HDTVs. 863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: 10 p.m. Latin Dance Night. No cover. www.iheg.com.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield: Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. Trivia at 7 p.m. Open Beer Pong tournament with Megan starts at 9 p.m. 773-8313.

Dance

PILOBOLUS DANCE THEATER, the popular dance company, known for its mind-blowing performances at the Academy Awards and Olympics, performs. 7:30 p.m. Main Theatre, Redfern Arts Center, Keene State College, Keene, N.H. Returning with the dance troupe is KSC 2010 graduate Shawn Ahern. Tickets $30 to $5, $5 KSC students. For tickets, call 603-358-2168, www.keene.edu/racbp.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Preschool story hour and craft time fun. Meet other people with small children and enjoy stories, songs, fingerplays and crafts with Sally Ahearn. 10 to 11 a.m. In the LeVanway Meeting Room. No sign up required. Free. For more information, call the children’s librarian at 772-1544 Ext. 5. ∎ Memoir writing workshop continues Tuesdays from 6 to 8 p.m. the workshop, led by Joannah Whitney, is organized around the premise that we all have stories to tell — we just need to make the time to tell them. Through Nov. 18.

WHATELY PUBLIC LIBRARY, 202 Chestnut Plain Road, Whately: Social Media & Marketing with Jeff RutherfordHe will discuss how small business and local entrepreneurs can use popular social media platforms (Facebook, Twitter, G+, Pinterest, Instagram, etc.) to increase sales and to find and attract new customers.i665-2170, www.whately.org/library.

Literary

GREENFIELD WORD: 9 Mill St., Greenfield. Spoken Word Greenfield, the third Tuesday of the month. Doors open at 7 p.m. Open mic at 7:30. $1 to $5 sliding scale cover. Open mic will be five minute slots with 10 open slots.

Music

CALVIN THEATER, 19 King St., Northampton: 8 p.m. 2Cellos featuring young Croatian cellists Luke Sulic and Stjepan Hauser. A Great Big World opens. $28.50, $38.50. www.iheg.com.

Wednesday 16

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Hump Night Karaoke in the Sports Bar hosted by Dirty Johnny at 9 p.m. on 14 HDTVs. No cover. 863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: 7 p.m. The Parkington Sisters. $12.50, $15. www.iheg.com.

PEARL STREET BALLROOM, 10 Pearl St., Northampton: 8:30 p.m. Morgan Page. Sam Whiting, Maor Levi and Audien opens. $21, $26. www.iheg.com.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. Restaurant Appreciation Night. Come in wearing your work shirt or show a pay stub and receive a special prize from Big Dan in the Sports Bar. Free pool for bar/restaurant employees. Sign up for complimentary prizes and giveaways. 773-8313.

Dance

LINE DANCING at the Moose Lodge, 20 School St., Greenfield. 7 to 10 p.m. Beginner to intermediate. Ring the doorbell for admittance. $5 per session. Beginner lessons at 7 p.m. Intermediate at 8. For more information, call Pat at 665-4260, jokellogg@aol.com.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. The library’s meeting room will be open Monday through Thursday for a Writer’s Lunch. This is a self-directed free writing time open to any writer who is looking for a place to work through their lunch. Bring your own lunch and beverage and stop in for all or part of Writer’s Lunch. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details. www.greenfieldpubliclibrary.org.

Literary

NOVELIST KEN KALFUS will read from his work at 8 p.m. at Amherst Books, 8 Main St., Amherst. Kalfus is author of novels including “A Disorder Peculiar to the Country,” “Equilateral.” Refreshments follow. Free.

Music

FALL FLOWER GROWER PROGRAM at Pioneer Gardens, Deerfield. The program will feature presentations throughout the day and tours of greenhouses. Topics will include “Your Family Business: How to Survive with Your Family,” “How to Grow Calibrachoas,” “The Best Energy Paybacks” and a grower to grower panel on the economics of using biological control for greenhouse ornamentals. Sponsored by UMass Extension and Mass. Flower Growers Association. $35 includes lunch. For program agenda, time and registration form: extension.umass.edu/floriculture.

Potpourri

ART FOR A CHANGE, The Art Garden, Shelburne Falls. A free program for artists who want their creativity engaged in service to their local and global community, for activists who want their work to be even more creative, and for community members who want to be a part of it all. Participants are asked to bring projects they care about, although bringing one is not a requirement. No idea is too small or too large to work on. Find out what other activists and artists have done. Work on a project in the company of others who also care about local and global issues. This seven-month series begins Wednesday, from 6 to 9 p.m. It meets again Nov. 13, Dec. 11, and once a month into 2014. www.theartgarden.org.

GREAT FALLS FARMERS MARKET, Avenue A and Second Street, Turners Falls, next to the Great Falls Discovery Center. 2 to 6 p.m. Fresh in-season local produce, perennials, annuals, vegetable plants, crafts and baked goods. Entertainment is frequently provided. Rain or shine. More information on Facebook.

Speakers

GREENFIELD COMMUNITY COLLEGE Senior Symposia: 2 to 4 p.m. GCC Downtown Center, 270 Main St., Greenfield. Alan C. Swedlund presents “Shadows in the Valley: Mortality in 19th Century Franklin County.” He will examine illness, death and loss from the mid-19th to early 20th century in small communities in western Massachusetts. $10. Financial assistance available by registration only. 775-1661, www.gcc.mass.edu/community_education.

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