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Foliage, and cider, doughnuts, fall treats to savor

  • This church in Shelurne Falls stands out against the fall foliage as seen from across the Deerfield River near Rt 2. 04/10/12 Franz

    This church in Shelurne Falls stands out against the fall foliage as seen from across the Deerfield River near Rt 2. 04/10/12 Franz Purchase photo reprints »

  • Walkers start off on the first leg of the long course during Crop Walk to stop hunger from the United Church of Bernardston Sunday<br/>STORY<br/>11/10/16 MacDonald

    Walkers start off on the first leg of the long course during Crop Walk to stop hunger from the United Church of Bernardston Sunday
    STORY
    11/10/16 MacDonald Purchase photo reprints »

  • This church in Shelurne Falls stands out against the fall foliage as seen from across the Deerfield River near Rt 2. 04/10/12 Franz
  • Walkers start off on the first leg of the long course during Crop Walk to stop hunger from the United Church of Bernardston Sunday<br/>STORY<br/>11/10/16 MacDonald

Hello neighbor.

On my way to and from work each day, I get to watch summer turn to fall, and will eventually watch fall turn to winter as snow glistens on bare branches and, unfortunately, covers the road — not too soon, I hope — along one of the nicest stretches I know. Right now, subtle yellows and pale oranges line the roadway, but bright reds are slowly making their appearance.

I know I seem to belabor the fall foliage theme, but it’s that time of year and it’s all around us. It’s something most of us take for granted, and then it’s gone for another year. So, I guess I’m trying to push you, just a little, to pay attention — or even take a ride you wouldn’t normally take.

I travel up and down North Leverett Road from Shutesbury through a tunnel of autumn greatness each day, and then cut across to Route 47 and into Montague Center in all of its New England small town charm.

But those are not the only places to go to drink in the county’s brilliant display of fall foliage.

Route 116 going north toward Conway is one of the most beautiful rides I know as the narrow road wends through the hills. And, don’t forget the Quabbin and the Mohawk Trail. The rolling hills of Whately are gorgeous this time of year, and who wouldn’t love the view of the Connecticut River from atop Mount Sugarloaf at this time of year.

If you’ve seen those places and are looking for something new, get in your car and go find your own favorite Franklin County fall scene. There certainly are plenty.

Grandson Justin and I took a short ride this weekend and found fall peeking through all over the county.

His comment, over and over, as he pointed to the trees, eyes wide open and smiling with fascination, was simply, “Wow!”

At one point, he picked up a leaf and tried to put it back on the tree. He too will learn about change as he grows.

We stopped for some cider and a doughnut as our excursion came to an end — he ate his and most of mine. I’m not going to say where we stopped for our treat, because there are so many great places throughout the county that will provide you with warm, spicy cider, a fresh, sugary doughnut or piece of hot apple pie — a virtual taste of fall.

OUR OWN COLORFUL PALETTE ALONG THE MOHAWK TRAIL was recognized recently in a travel article in the New York Times.

On Oct. 4, Mark VanHoenacker referred the trail as one of the country’s great American roads.

He referred to “joyful curves, inviting side roads, mountain streams and, in the fall, crimson foliage and bright blue, cider-ready afternoons.”

Sounds delicious, doesn’t it! The leaves are changing a little more each day, so don’t wait until they all fall.

COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTER OF FRANKLIN COUNTY will hold its “Crucial Catch” breast cancer kickoff event Thursday from 6 to 8 p.m. at Greenfield Community College in the dining commons. Women of all ages in the Franklin County and North Quabbin areas are invited to attend.

The event, which will include dinner and giveaways, is free and open to the public. Speakers will include Sharleen Moffatt, a breast cancer survivor.

The clinic staff traveled to Gillette Stadium this past weekend to pick up a $50,000 grant provided by the New England Patriots and the National Football League through the American Cancer Society’s CHANGE program, which aims to provide organizations financial help with breast cancer screenings and early detection programming.

The clinic plans to use the money to deploy a community outreach team into the county over the next several months to educate women on the importance of early breast cancer screenings and regular office visits and on the services the health center provides.

THE 26TH ANNUAL FRANKLIN COUNTY CROP WALK will be held Oct. 21 beginning at the Central Congregational Church, 93 South Main St., Orange.

Registration will begin at 1 p.m. and the walk will begin at 2.

Organizers would like to see lots of people show up to walk for hunger, locally and worldwide. People can make a donation or get others to sponsor their walk.

There is a choice of walking routes and maps will be provided at registration. There will be refreshments served at the church after the walk.

For more information, call
978-544-6623.

THE FRIENDS OF DICKINSON MEMORIAL LIBRARY in Northfield are sponsoring another dog show – this is the third year in a row – on Saturday from 1 to 3 p.m. in the library parking lot.

There will be judges who will judge in many different categories, including “best tail-wagger,” “best look-alike,” and “best dressed.”

A professional photographer will take photographs that will be used to make a calendar, which will be sold by the Friends in December.

Cider and doughnuts will be available.

SEEDS OF SOLIDARITY FARM on Chestnut Hill Road in Orange will offer a free morning tour and an afternoon harvest market on Oct. 20 beginning at 10 a.m.

This will be the last public tour until next June, so take advantage of the invitation.

After the tour, visitors will be able to enjoy Seeds of Solidarity solar-powered farm stand, where they will be able to purchase garlic, hot peppers, sweet and gourmet potatoes, greens, rustic furniture and more.

Founders and farmers Ricky Baruc and Deb Habib will be on hand from noon to 3 p.m. to offer tips and answer questions.

For more information and to preregister for the free event, visit: www.seedsofsolidarity.org.

THERE ARE LOTS OF EXCITING THINGS going on at the Leverett Library.

First, the library continues to sell tickets for its quilt raffle, which will be held Saturday at 1 p.m. at the Harvest Festival.

The winner will choose one of four quilts donated by Bob Walker. Tickets are available at the library and will be available at the festival.

The library also has more “Roads of Leverett” T-shirts for sale. Road names have been updated.

The first chance to get the new T-shirts will be at the festival. They are $10 for youth sizes (S, M and L) and $15 for adult sizes (S, M, L, XL and XXL).

COMEDIAN ELLEN VILLANI OF GREENFIELD will perform at Artspace Community Arts Center, 15 Mill St. on Oct. 19.

The Soup and Sass event will feature her performance after soup and hearty appetizers are served at 5:30 p.m. The Sass portion will begin at 6:30 p.m.

Ellen will share her thoughts on many subjects, including President Barack Obama and Republican presidential candidate and former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney.

Proceeds from Soup and Sass will support Artspace Strings for Kids program in the Greenfield public schools, which now served more than 100 students in grades three through seven with free, weekly group violin or cello lessons.

Tickets are $20 for Soup and Sass and $10 for just Sass.

For more information or to make reservations, call 413-772-6811.

To contact Anita Fritz, a staff reporter at The Recorder, send an email to anita.alice.fritz@gmail.com or 413-772-0261, ext. 280 or her cell at 413-388-6950. You can also reach her on Facebook at Anita’s Neighbors. Information to be included in Neighbors may also be sent to:
neighbors@recorder.com the day before you want it to run.

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