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Exhibits: museums and galleries

Submitted photo
GCC professor exhibits at UMass
The Augusta Savage Gallery, at the Fine Arts Center at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, has an exhibit up that features the work of Kelly Popoff, a professor in the Arts Department at Greenfield Community College. Through March 14. See “Ongoing.”
Here is a statement from the artist: 
“At nighttime as a child, I use to pray for all the people I thought needed praying for – poor, sick, lonely, abused. I would work myself into a panic thinking about this, which would inevitably lead to deeper concerns about living and dying. There is something about this time as a child that has had a major impact on my creative center. Equally influential (and definitely linked!), is the dualistic nature of a child-mind immersed in the heavy content of a Catholic upbringing. I am aware of the juxtaposition of these opposing forces and how they sit next to each other in my mind — forces that are evident in my work, both in form and content. Though, as an adult, I do not practice Catholicism, the visual and literary traditions of Catholicism and their messages have infiltrated my thinking and imagination.
“In my most recent body of work, ‘Rocks on Doilies,’ I was thinking about a heavy head on a lacey child’s pillow. I thought about a rock on a doily, a contemplation of dualism and contradiction. I was a rock on a doily.
“In the Bible, rocks are a symbol of “that which endures.”  Rocks in my paintings are loved ones that are eternal and endure life and death. Doilies are temporary, light and fleeting. They are ceremony and baptisms and first communions that come and go. They have patterns that repeat like tradition. They are halos and decoration. They are pillows and trim. Doilies are adornment for show.
“Drawing and painting methods are used interchangeably when I work to build up a ground of line and value. I use an electric sander like an eraser, deconstructing areas of value and line. I see my process of composing and decomposing the material as a reference to the body and more specifically the duality of life and death, body and spirit.”
— Kelly Popoff

Submitted photo GCC professor exhibits at UMass The Augusta Savage Gallery, at the Fine Arts Center at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst, has an exhibit up that features the work of Kelly Popoff, a professor in the Arts Department at Greenfield Community College. Through March 14. See “Ongoing.” Here is a statement from the artist: “At nighttime as a child, I use to pray for all the people I thought needed praying for – poor, sick, lonely, abused. I would work myself into a panic thinking about this, which would inevitably lead to deeper concerns about living and dying. There is something about this time as a child that has had a major impact on my creative center. Equally influential (and definitely linked!), is the dualistic nature of a child-mind immersed in the heavy content of a Catholic upbringing. I am aware of the juxtaposition of these opposing forces and how they sit next to each other in my mind — forces that are evident in my work, both in form and content. Though, as an adult, I do not practice Catholicism, the visual and literary traditions of Catholicism and their messages have infiltrated my thinking and imagination. “In my most recent body of work, ‘Rocks on Doilies,’ I was thinking about a heavy head on a lacey child’s pillow. I thought about a rock on a doily, a contemplation of dualism and contradiction. I was a rock on a doily. “In the Bible, rocks are a symbol of “that which endures.” Rocks in my paintings are loved ones that are eternal and endure life and death. Doilies are temporary, light and fleeting. They are ceremony and baptisms and first communions that come and go. They have patterns that repeat like tradition. They are halos and decoration. They are pillows and trim. Doilies are adornment for show. “Drawing and painting methods are used interchangeably when I work to build up a ground of line and value. I use an electric sander like an eraser, deconstructing areas of value and line. I see my process of composing and decomposing the material as a reference to the body and more specifically the duality of life and death, body and spirit.” — Kelly Popoff

Receptions etc.

Ending soon

Ongoing

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