Arts & Entertainment Calendar: Sept. 12 to 18

  • ‘Little Mermaid Jr.’<br/>The Ja’Duke Center for the Performing Arts will stage “The Little Mermaid Jr” at Yankee Candle Theater in South Deerfield. There will be two shows each day on Saturday and Sunday. See “Theater.”

    ‘Little Mermaid Jr.’
    The Ja’Duke Center for the Performing Arts will stage “The Little Mermaid Jr” at Yankee Candle Theater in South Deerfield. There will be two shows each day on Saturday and Sunday. See “Theater.”

  • THE PIONEER VALLEY TRANSITION TOWNS Film Festival presents locally made films on “How Communities Are Working toward Sustainable Living.” Friday, 7 p.m. Cohn Dining Commons, Greenfield Community College, 1 College Drive, Greenfield. The top 10 juried films shot in the Greater Pioneer Valley with subject matter directly related to sustainability in the region. Local documentarian Rawn Fulton will be the MC for this event and prizes, funded by the Pioneer Valley Institute, will be given out for the top three short films in the competitive category. All are invited to a Meet the Filmmakers reception. Free, donations accepted. www.transitionnorthfieldma.org.<br/>

    THE PIONEER VALLEY TRANSITION TOWNS Film Festival presents locally made films on “How Communities Are Working toward Sustainable Living.” Friday, 7 p.m. Cohn Dining Commons, Greenfield Community College, 1 College Drive, Greenfield. The top 10 juried films shot in the Greater Pioneer Valley with subject matter directly related to sustainability in the region. Local documentarian Rawn Fulton will be the MC for this event and prizes, funded by the Pioneer Valley Institute, will be given out for the top three short films in the competitive category. All are invited to a Meet the Filmmakers reception. Free, donations accepted. www.transitionnorthfieldma.org.

  • MIRO SPRAGUE, jazz pianist. Brooks-Rogers Recital Hall, Williams College, Williamstown. Thursday, 8 p.m. Free. Sprague, originally from western Massachusetts, performs solo and has been leading his own group, the Miro Sprague Trio, since 2002. He is the pianist for Samirah Evans and Her Handsome Devils and also for the Michael Zsoldos Quartet and Duo. The Brattleboro Reformer described Mr. Sprague’s improvising as unexpected but melodic, “where three trailing notes of a phrase can become seed, stem and blossom in a completely different place ... No matter how far fetched, each new turn is entirely musical.” Sprague has received National Student Music Awards from Downbeat Magazine in 2002, 2003 and 2004. His recordings include “Trio Mission” (2002), “Opening” (2005), and “Center of the Art” (live solo recording 2012.) He is currently studying at the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance at UCLA. He graduated from the Manhattan School of Music with a Bachelor of Music degree in jazz piano performance.<br/>

    MIRO SPRAGUE, jazz pianist. Brooks-Rogers Recital Hall, Williams College, Williamstown. Thursday, 8 p.m. Free. Sprague, originally from western Massachusetts, performs solo and has been leading his own group, the Miro Sprague Trio, since 2002. He is the pianist for Samirah Evans and Her Handsome Devils and also for the Michael Zsoldos Quartet and Duo. The Brattleboro Reformer described Mr. Sprague’s improvising as unexpected but melodic, “where three trailing notes of a phrase can become seed, stem and blossom in a completely different place ... No matter how far fetched, each new turn is entirely musical.” Sprague has received National Student Music Awards from Downbeat Magazine in 2002, 2003 and 2004. His recordings include “Trio Mission” (2002), “Opening” (2005), and “Center of the Art” (live solo recording 2012.) He is currently studying at the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance at UCLA. He graduated from the Manhattan School of Music with a Bachelor of Music degree in jazz piano performance.

  • GREAT FALLS COFFEEHOUSE, Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Friday 7 to 9 p.m. Music by Pitchfork. Promoters say to expect deep backwoods grooves and stark New England poetry venturing into expansive wavelengths of harmonica, trombone and tuba. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments available. Museum and museum store open at intermission. Donations ($6 to $12 suggested) help the Friends support free programming at the center.<br/>Rob Skelton during a recent Pitchfork practice session in Leverett. Trish Crapo photo.

    GREAT FALLS COFFEEHOUSE, Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Friday 7 to 9 p.m. Music by Pitchfork. Promoters say to expect deep backwoods grooves and stark New England poetry venturing into expansive wavelengths of harmonica, trombone and tuba. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments available. Museum and museum store open at intermission. Donations ($6 to $12 suggested) help the Friends support free programming at the center.
    Rob Skelton during a recent Pitchfork practice session in Leverett. Trish Crapo photo.

  • SUZANNE FLYNT will give a lecture and slide presentation Thursday on her recently published book, “Poetry to the Earth: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Deerfield.” 7 p.m. Memorial Hall Museum, Deerfield. The event is free and includes an opportunity to view the new exhibit, “Skilled Hands and High Ideals” from 6:30 until the lecture begins at 7. Free. Books will be available for sale after the presentation. 774-7476, www.deerfield-ma.org. <br/>

    SUZANNE FLYNT will give a lecture and slide presentation Thursday on her recently published book, “Poetry to the Earth: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Deerfield.” 7 p.m. Memorial Hall Museum, Deerfield. The event is free and includes an opportunity to view the new exhibit, “Skilled Hands and High Ideals” from 6:30 until the lecture begins at 7. Free. Books will be available for sale after the presentation. 774-7476, www.deerfield-ma.org.

  • Recorder/Paul Franz<br/>Lefty’s Fest Saturday<br/>We told you about Lefty’s Brewing Co. in Saturday’s paper, so we just want to remind you that its festival and customer appreciation day is Saturday in Bernardston. In addition to the unveiling of two new beers, the festival will include live music, dancing, games and prizes. Now based in Greenfield, Lefty’s is returning to its roots by hosting this festival in Bernardston. See “Potpourri.”Goldfarb drains a little off the top so he can pour a new head for a photo shoot

    Recorder/Paul Franz
    Lefty’s Fest Saturday
    We told you about Lefty’s Brewing Co. in Saturday’s paper, so we just want to remind you that its festival and customer appreciation day is Saturday in Bernardston. In addition to the unveiling of two new beers, the festival will include live music, dancing, games and prizes. Now based in Greenfield, Lefty’s is returning to its roots by hosting this festival in Bernardston. See “Potpourri.”Goldfarb drains a little off the top so he can pour a new head for a photo shoot

  • “COUNTY FAIR” 1794 Meetinghouse, New Salem. Saturday, 7:30 p.m. Community musical in which the stage, auditorium, vestibule and lawn will transform into a 1939 fairgrounds replete with chorus and a parade of engaging characters straight out of pre-war lore. Featuring a 50-member cast directed by Dorothy Johnson and Andy Lichtenberg, who say this is their 10th and last collaboration. These performances are unique in that roles are created for anyone who wants to participate. There are no auditions for parts. The show concludes Sunday. $10 adults and seniors; free for children 12 and under. Tickets available at the door or at www.1794meetinghouse.org, at New Salem General Store, and Bruce’s Browser, 1497 Main St., Athol.<br/>

    “COUNTY FAIR” 1794 Meetinghouse, New Salem. Saturday, 7:30 p.m. Community musical in which the stage, auditorium, vestibule and lawn will transform into a 1939 fairgrounds replete with chorus and a parade of engaging characters straight out of pre-war lore. Featuring a 50-member cast directed by Dorothy Johnson and Andy Lichtenberg, who say this is their 10th and last collaboration. These performances are unique in that roles are created for anyone who wants to participate. There are no auditions for parts. The show concludes Sunday. $10 adults and seniors; free for children 12 and under. Tickets available at the door or at www.1794meetinghouse.org, at New Salem General Store, and Bruce’s Browser, 1497 Main St., Athol.

  • DANIEL BOTKIN, manager of Laughing Dog Farm in Gill, will speak about Backyard Permaculture at the Historical Society of Greenfield, 43 Church St., Greenfield. Tuesday, 7 p.m. Backyard permaculture seeks to integrate the concepts and practices of ecological design with practical four-season food production, even on marginal land or in small spaces. He will describe innovative “guerilla gardening” and season extension techniques that he has honed on his five-acre lot, including low-till vertical farming and winter tunnels. For more than 10 years, Botkin and his wife, Divya, have been hand-raising diverse produce, flowers, herbs, fruits, rabbits and goats. They operate a small CSA and teach a variety of do-it-yourself farming and food-oriented workshops from the farm and beyond. Free; voluntary donations gratefully accepted at the door. There will be time after the presentation for questions and conversation.<br/>

    DANIEL BOTKIN, manager of Laughing Dog Farm in Gill, will speak about Backyard Permaculture at the Historical Society of Greenfield, 43 Church St., Greenfield. Tuesday, 7 p.m. Backyard permaculture seeks to integrate the concepts and practices of ecological design with practical four-season food production, even on marginal land or in small spaces. He will describe innovative “guerilla gardening” and season extension techniques that he has honed on his five-acre lot, including low-till vertical farming and winter tunnels. For more than 10 years, Botkin and his wife, Divya, have been hand-raising diverse produce, flowers, herbs, fruits, rabbits and goats. They operate a small CSA and teach a variety of do-it-yourself farming and food-oriented workshops from the farm and beyond. Free; voluntary donations gratefully accepted at the door. There will be time after the presentation for questions and conversation.

  • File image<br/>3 days of music, camping, fun<br/>The 15th annual Wormtown Music Festival comes to Camp Kee-wanee in Greenfield Friday, Saturday and Sunday. There will more than 50 bands on five stages throughout the wooded campground. If you don’t yet have tickets, get them by Thursday noon at the various ticket venues for $100. Otherwise, tickets to the full festival will cost you $120 at the gate. You can also show up early this year on Thursday, after 5 p.m., for an additional $30 per person. The lineup includes Rusted Root, Oteil Burbridge of the Allman Brothers, Max Creek, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Ryan Montbleau, Zach Deputy, Kung Fu, Lovewhip, The Alchemystics, Rhythm Inc., The Equalities and The Rev Tor Band, which will host a live performance of “The Last Waltz. In addition to camping, there will be craft vendors, a local farmers market, family activities and roaming entertainers. See “Music.”

    File image
    3 days of music, camping, fun
    The 15th annual Wormtown Music Festival comes to Camp Kee-wanee in Greenfield Friday, Saturday and Sunday. There will more than 50 bands on five stages throughout the wooded campground. If you don’t yet have tickets, get them by Thursday noon at the various ticket venues for $100. Otherwise, tickets to the full festival will cost you $120 at the gate. You can also show up early this year on Thursday, after 5 p.m., for an additional $30 per person. The lineup includes Rusted Root, Oteil Burbridge of the Allman Brothers, Max Creek, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Ryan Montbleau, Zach Deputy, Kung Fu, Lovewhip, The Alchemystics, Rhythm Inc., The Equalities and The Rev Tor Band, which will host a live performance of “The Last Waltz. In addition to camping, there will be craft vendors, a local farmers market, family activities and roaming entertainers. See “Music.”

  • ‘Little Mermaid Jr.’<br/>The Ja’Duke Center for the Performing Arts will stage “The Little Mermaid Jr” at Yankee Candle Theater in South Deerfield. There will be two shows each day on Saturday and Sunday. See “Theater.”
  • THE PIONEER VALLEY TRANSITION TOWNS Film Festival presents locally made films on “How Communities Are Working toward Sustainable Living.” Friday, 7 p.m. Cohn Dining Commons, Greenfield Community College, 1 College Drive, Greenfield. The top 10 juried films shot in the Greater Pioneer Valley with subject matter directly related to sustainability in the region. Local documentarian Rawn Fulton will be the MC for this event and prizes, funded by the Pioneer Valley Institute, will be given out for the top three short films in the competitive category. All are invited to a Meet the Filmmakers reception. Free, donations accepted. www.transitionnorthfieldma.org.<br/>
  • MIRO SPRAGUE, jazz pianist. Brooks-Rogers Recital Hall, Williams College, Williamstown. Thursday, 8 p.m. Free. Sprague, originally from western Massachusetts, performs solo and has been leading his own group, the Miro Sprague Trio, since 2002. He is the pianist for Samirah Evans and Her Handsome Devils and also for the Michael Zsoldos Quartet and Duo. The Brattleboro Reformer described Mr. Sprague’s improvising as unexpected but melodic, “where three trailing notes of a phrase can become seed, stem and blossom in a completely different place ... No matter how far fetched, each new turn is entirely musical.” Sprague has received National Student Music Awards from Downbeat Magazine in 2002, 2003 and 2004. His recordings include “Trio Mission” (2002), “Opening” (2005), and “Center of the Art” (live solo recording 2012.) He is currently studying at the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance at UCLA. He graduated from the Manhattan School of Music with a Bachelor of Music degree in jazz piano performance.<br/>
  • GREAT FALLS COFFEEHOUSE, Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Friday 7 to 9 p.m. Music by Pitchfork. Promoters say to expect deep backwoods grooves and stark New England poetry venturing into expansive wavelengths of harmonica, trombone and tuba. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments available. Museum and museum store open at intermission. Donations ($6 to $12 suggested) help the Friends support free programming at the center.<br/>Rob Skelton during a recent Pitchfork practice session in Leverett. Trish Crapo photo.
  • SUZANNE FLYNT will give a lecture and slide presentation Thursday on her recently published book, “Poetry to the Earth: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Deerfield.” 7 p.m. Memorial Hall Museum, Deerfield. The event is free and includes an opportunity to view the new exhibit, “Skilled Hands and High Ideals” from 6:30 until the lecture begins at 7. Free. Books will be available for sale after the presentation. 774-7476, www.deerfield-ma.org. <br/>
  • Recorder/Paul Franz<br/>Lefty’s Fest Saturday<br/>We told you about Lefty’s Brewing Co. in Saturday’s paper, so we just want to remind you that its festival and customer appreciation day is Saturday in Bernardston. In addition to the unveiling of two new beers, the festival will include live music, dancing, games and prizes. Now based in Greenfield, Lefty’s is returning to its roots by hosting this festival in Bernardston. See “Potpourri.”Goldfarb drains a little off the top so he can pour a new head for a photo shoot
  • “COUNTY FAIR” 1794 Meetinghouse, New Salem. Saturday, 7:30 p.m. Community musical in which the stage, auditorium, vestibule and lawn will transform into a 1939 fairgrounds replete with chorus and a parade of engaging characters straight out of pre-war lore. Featuring a 50-member cast directed by Dorothy Johnson and Andy Lichtenberg, who say this is their 10th and last collaboration. These performances are unique in that roles are created for anyone who wants to participate. There are no auditions for parts. The show concludes Sunday. $10 adults and seniors; free for children 12 and under. Tickets available at the door or at www.1794meetinghouse.org, at New Salem General Store, and Bruce’s Browser, 1497 Main St., Athol.<br/>
  • DANIEL BOTKIN, manager of Laughing Dog Farm in Gill, will speak about Backyard Permaculture at the Historical Society of Greenfield, 43 Church St., Greenfield. Tuesday, 7 p.m. Backyard permaculture seeks to integrate the concepts and practices of ecological design with practical four-season food production, even on marginal land or in small spaces. He will describe innovative “guerilla gardening” and season extension techniques that he has honed on his five-acre lot, including low-till vertical farming and winter tunnels. For more than 10 years, Botkin and his wife, Divya, have been hand-raising diverse produce, flowers, herbs, fruits, rabbits and goats. They operate a small CSA and teach a variety of do-it-yourself farming and food-oriented workshops from the farm and beyond. Free; voluntary donations gratefully accepted at the door. There will be time after the presentation for questions and conversation.<br/>
  • File image<br/>3 days of music, camping, fun<br/>The 15th annual Wormtown Music Festival comes to Camp Kee-wanee in Greenfield Friday, Saturday and Sunday. There will more than 50 bands on five stages throughout the wooded campground. If you don’t yet have tickets, get them by Thursday noon at the various ticket venues for $100. Otherwise, tickets to the full festival will cost you $120 at the gate. You can also show up early this year on Thursday, after 5 p.m., for an additional $30 per person. The lineup includes Rusted Root, Oteil Burbridge of the Allman Brothers, Max Creek, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Ryan Montbleau, Zach Deputy, Kung Fu, Lovewhip, The Alchemystics, Rhythm Inc., The Equalities and The Rev Tor Band, which will host a live performance of “The Last Waltz. In addition to camping, there will be craft vendors, a local farmers market, family activities and roaming entertainers. See “Music.”

Thursday 12

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. NFL Thursday Night Football, Patriots vs. Jets at 8:25 p.m. on 14 HDTVs. Enter $500 cash giveaway, munchies, Bud Light specials, BTU prize wheel, Pats Cash chances to win every quarter and more. 863-2882.

DEJA BREW CAFE & PUB, 57A Lockes Village Road, Wendell. The Surly Temple. Jim Henry, Guy DeVito, Doug Plavin and Tommy Boynton. 8 to 10:30 p.m. 978-544-2739. No cover. www.dejabrewpub.com.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: ∎ 7 p.m. Sam Amidon. Wesley Hartley and the Traveling Trees open. $12.50, $15. ∎ 10 p.m. Makaya McCraven Trio. $10, $13. www.iheg.com.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Sam Octoberfest promo prizes and giveaways. Red Sox vs Tampa Bay at 7 p.m. NFL Football Patriots vs Jets at 8 p.m. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. Thirsty Thursdays and college night hosted by Big Dan in the Sports Bar. Beer Pong Tournament. Wear your college shirt or show your college ID to be entered in end-of-the-night prizes. 773-8313.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. the library’s meeting room will be open each Monday through Thursday for a Writer’s Lunch. This is a self-directed free writing time open to any writer who is looking for a place to work through lunch. Bring your own lunch and beverage. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details.

MILLERS FALLS LIBRARY, Millers Falls: Music and Movement for Young Children series with Laurie Davidson and Tom Carroll. Thursdays at 10 a.m. Through Dec 19. For more information, call 863-3214.

Films

“ROOT HOG OR DIE.” A viewing of this documentary film will precede the meeting of the Colrain Historical Society, at the home of Joan McQuade,
7 Main Road in Colrain. The film, made in 1970 by Rawn Fulton, features farmers and farm wives from Bernardston, Leyden and southern Vermont talking about farm life in the first half of the 20th century. Colrain’s Fred Call is also featured in the film, which evokes a way of life mostly gone. The meeting will be at 7 p.m., followed by the film around 7:30. Refreshments will be served and the public is welcome. For information, call Phil at 624-3710.

Literary

SUZANNE FLYNT will give a lecture and slide presentation on her recently published book, “Poetry to the Earth: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Deerfield.” 7 p.m. Memorial Hall Museum, Deerfield. The event is free and includes an opportunity to view the new exhibit, “Skilled Hands and High Ideals” from 6:30 until the lecture begins at 7. Free. Books will be available for sale after the presentation. 774-7476, www.deerfield-ma.org.

Music

DIETRICH STRAUSE AND RACHEL RIES with guest Zachariah Hickman in concert. 7 p.m. the Parlor Room at Signature Sounds, 32 Masonic St., Northampton. $10. 665-4036, flora@signaturesounds.com.

MIRO SPRAGUE, jazz pianist. Brooks-Rogers Recital Hall, Williams College, Williamstown. 8 p.m. Free. Sprague, originally from western Massachusetts, performs solo and has been leading his own group, the Miro Sprague Trio, since 2002. He is the pianist for Samirah Evans and Her Handsome Devils and also for the Michael Zsoldos Quartet and Duo. The Brattleboro Reformer described Mr. Sprague’s improvising as unexpected but melodic, “where three trailing notes of a phrase can become seed, stem and blossom in a completely different place ... No matter how far fetched, each new turn is entirely musical.” Sprague has received National Student Music Awards from Downbeat Magazine in 2002, 2003 and 2004. His recordings include “Trio Mission” (2002), “Opening” (2005), and “Center of the Art” (live solo recording 2012.) He is currently studying at the Thelonious Monk Institute of Jazz Performance at UCLA. He graduated from the Manhattan School of Music with a Bachelor of Music degree in jazz piano performance.

Potpourri

ED GREGORY will present a CD slide show on Catamount Hill in Colrain at 7 p.m. Shelburne Hisotrical Society Museum (former Arms Academy), Church and Maple streets, Shelburne.Books Are Fun Book Fair, main lobby of Franklin Medical Center, 164 High St., Greenfield. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hardcover books in all categories, including best sellers, children’s books, cookbooks, sports, gardening, history, travel and more. Benefits patients and services.

THE NORTHFIELD FARMERS MARKET: 3 to 6 p.m. 105 Main St., in front of Northfield Coffee and Books. (New location). Vendors will offer a variety of vegetables and fruits, meat, eggs, baked goods, plants, crafts and more.

REDFERN ARTS CENTER at Keene State College “Season Kick-off Party.” 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Free food, check out an exhibition in the Redfern lobby and learn more about the events happening at the Redfern during the 2013-14 season. www.keene.edu.

WINGS OF FREEDOM TOUR: World War II history at Orange Municipal Airport, Orange. A re-enactment of World War II bomber pilot mission briefings will be featured when three vintage WWII aircraft anchor a three-day historical event that started Wednesday. A Boeing B-17 Flying Fortress, the Consolidated B-24 Liberator and the North American P-51 Mustang, along with a Sherman tank and a half track will be on display. David Bramhall of Phillipston will outline the infamous bombing run to Berlin, which was the 275th mission of the 379th Bomb Group. That day, Feb. 3, 1945, the 379th led over 1,000 bombers from 30 bomb groups of the Eighth Air Force stationed at American air bases throughout England to Berlin. Bramhall has researched the actual mission records and will give instructions as they were given to those airmen over 60 years ago. To add to the realism, Alex DiSanto, 91, of Melbourne, Fla., is expected to attend. He was the navigator in the lead plane of this mission lead by Col. Lewis E. Lyle. Local resident Bill Purple of Petersham, who was the lead pilot of a B-17 in the second bomb squadron of that mission, was the 13th pilot in the stream of B-17s to reach Berlin that day. Purple will be at the airport throughout the three days, as he is the “commander in charge” for the event. The briefing will be held at various times throughout the three days to coincide with visiting school groups and all attendees are welcome to attend and relive the mission briefing experience. There will also be walk-through tours and rides in the Collings Foundation aircraft.There will also be 1940s musical entertainment Thursday and World War portrait exhibit will be on display.

Theater

“THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE” presented by Shakespeare & Co., in the Bernstein Theatre, 70 Kemble St., Lenox. Set in the small village of Leenane, County Galway in Ireland, the play tracks the dysfunctional relationship between a mother and daughter who are locked in a dance of mutual loathing. 8:30 p.m. Tickets $10 to $50. 637-3353, www.shakespeare.org. Through Sept. 15. No Sundays or Mondays.

Friday 13

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Friday Night Karaoke in the Sports Bar with Dirty Johnny at 9 p.m. followed by the best in Top 40, dance and hip hop in The Extra Point Nightclub spun by DJ MIA at 10 p.m. No cover. 863-2882.

DEJA BREW CAFE & PUB, 57A Lockes Village Road, Wendell. Barrett Anderson. Renegade Blues. 9 to 11:30 p.m. 978-544-2739. No cover. www.dejabrewpub.com.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: ∎ 7 p.m. Southside Johnny and the Poor Fools. Pegi Young and The Survivors opens. $35, $40. ∎ 10 p.m. Fat Bradley. Freddy and the Yetis opens. $8, $10. www.iheg.com.

PEARL STREET BALLROOM, 10 Pearl St., Northampton: 9 p.m. One More Time: A Tribute to Daft Punk. BRRIO, 4LMNTZ and Arclite open. $13, $15. www.iheg.com.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Community Smokes. Reggae-rock-blues. 9:30 p.m. Free. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

ROUTE 63 ROADHOUSE, Route 63, Millers Falls: Josh LeVangie and the Mud, Blood and Beer Band. 9 p.m. 659-3384.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, Main Street, Greenfield: Red Sox vs. NY Yankees at 7 p.m. Friday night madness with Big Dan in the sports bar. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. 773-8313.

Dance

AMHERST INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: Every Friday night, 7:30 to 10 p.m. Bangs Community Center, Boltwood Walk, Amherst Center. Dances from the Balkans, Middle Eastern Europe, more. You need not bring a partner. Live music first Fridays of the month. Some teaching. Beginners welcome. Donation. 549-6748. www.amherstfolkdancing.org.

SECOND FRIDAY CONTRADANCE, Guiding Star Grange, 401 Chapman St., Greenfield.The band usually includes or is at least organized by David Kaynor (fiddle, guitar, frequent caller), Peter Siegel (guitar/mandolin), and Stuart Kenney (bass/banjo). Usually, there are also hired guests and sit-ins are always welcome. 8 to 11 p.m. Self-determined free will contribution; $10 suggested; barter welcome. www.guidingstargrange.org/

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Mother Goose on the Loose. Happy circle with Kay Lyons at a lap sit story hour for children ages 3 and under. Rhymes, songs and movement games. 11 a.m.
∎ Writers’ Workshop. Noon to 2 p.m. Fridays. Jane Buchanan and Joannah Whitney lead the program, which includes writing exercises and discussion and an opportunity to share what has been written. Participants encouraged to attend the open writing periods during the week as well. No charge and registration not required. Contact Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details. ■ Open for Business. 2 p.m. Reliable WiFi and a quiet workspace in the LeVanway Meeting Room Mondays and Fridays from 2 to 5 p.m.

Music

CALVIN THEATER, 19 King St., Northampton: City and Colour in concert. Acclaimed singer, songwriter and performer Dallas Green kicks off his eight-week U.S. tour. Lucy Rose opens. $30, $35. www.iheg.com.

CONOR & AYANO DUO 10th anniversary concert. 8 p.m. Bezanson Recital Hall, UMass-Amherst. Umass professor Ayano Kataoka, percussionist and guest Conor Nelson, flute, Bowling Green State University. Works by Kirchner, Tanabe, Noda and others. $3 UMass students, $5 other students, children, seniors; $10 general public; free for UMass music majors and minors. Tickets available at the Fine Arts Center Box office, 545-2511, fac.umass.edu/musicanddance.

GREAT FALLS COFFEEHOUSE, Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls. 7 to 9 p.m. Music by Pitchfork. Promoters say to expect deep backwoods grooves and stark New England poetry venturing into expansive wavelengths of harmonica, trombone and tuba. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. Refreshments available. Museum and museum store open at intermission. Donations ($6 to $12 suggested) help the Friends support free programming at the center.

RAY MASON performs at the Cummington Cafe, Village Church, Main Street, Cummington. 7 to 9 p.m. No cover; tips appreciated. 563-1981.

WORMTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL at Camp Kee-wanee, Greenfield. Three days and two nights of music, camping, craft vending, family activities, roaming entertainers and more. Performances by: Rusted Root, Oteil Burbridge of the Allman Brothers, Max Creek, New Riders of the Purple Sage, Ryan Montbleauy, Zach Deputy, Kung Fu, Rev Tor and more than 50 other bands on five stages throughout wooded campgrounds. This year’s festival will feature a newly expanded local farmer’s market and the return of the Holstic Cabin, a new space for wellness-oriented activities such as Chi Gung. (This year, patrons who wish to arrive early can pay an additional entry fee to come in Thursday night. For the first time, there will be live music Thursday night.) Through Sunday. Area listeners who enjoyed the “Last Waltz Live” performance at Memorial Hall in Shelburne Falls last March might be interested to know that the Rev Tor Band, which does these reenactments of The Band’s final concert, will be at Wormtown this year. There will also be plenty of local acts like The Equalites and Alychemystics as well as area favorites like country rockers Yarn, which established a strong local fan base while playing the Route 63 Roadhouse back when the band was starting out. Tickets include camping for the weekend. $100 for the three days of music. These can be purchased through Thursday, noon, at the Wine Rack, 70 Main St., Greenfield or at Lit’l Bears Den, 229 St., Greenfield. If you prefer to charge by phone, you can call the Northampton box office at 413-586-8686. Single-day passes are available for Sunday only and these are $40 at the gate. Full-festival passes will cost $120 at the gate. For more information: www.wormtownmusicfestival.com.

Potpourri

WINGS OF FREEDOM TOUR concludes. See Thursday’s listing.

Theater

“THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE” continues. See Thursday’s listing.

Saturday 14

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, Turners Falls: College football Saturday all day and night on 14 HDTVs featuring Notre Dame vs. Purdue at 8 p.m. plus Dancing in The Extra Point Nightclub at 10 p.m. with DJ J-ill spinning favorites. No cover. 863-2882.

DEJA BREW CAFE & PUB, 57A Lockes Village Road, Wendell. the Reprobate Blues Band. Blues baby blues! 9 to 11:30 p.m. 978-544-2739. No cover. www.dejabrewpub.com.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton. ∎ 7 p.m. Sarah Lee Guthrie and Johnny Irion. The Melodic opens. $12.50, $15. www.iheg.com.

LUTHIER’S CO-OP, 108 Cottage St., Easthampton: Lonesome Brothers, Rick Murnane Band, Lesa Bezo. 7 to 8 p.m. No cover; tips appreciated. 527-6627, www.luthiers-coop.com.

ROUTE 63 ROADHOUSE, route 63, Millers Falls: Ketch-Fyre. Modern and classic rock. 9:30 p.m. 659-3384.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield: Red Sox vs. NY Yankees at 1 p.m. Saturday night madness with Tyler downstairs in Taylor’s Tavern. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. 773-8313.

Dance

MONADNOCK SQUARE DANCE at the Recreation Center, 312 Washington St., Keene, N.H. 8 to 10:30 p.m. Ted Lizotte, caller; Harriett Clarke, cuer.

TOPHILL MUSIC CONTRADANCE PARTY with Gaslight Tinkers and Ms. Mary Wesley, Guiding Star Grange, 401 Chapman St., Greenfield. 8 to 11:30 p.m. $10. www.guidingstargrange.org.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Magic Tree House Event. Featuring “The Magic Tree House” series by Mary Pope Osborne. Come in costume based on any of the books in the series. For more information or to sign up, call the library at 772-1544 Ext. 5.

Literary

“ROCK AND WRITE,” experiential writing workshop led by Ann Forcier. 10 a.m. at Gate 40 which is off Route 32A, Hardwick Road in Petersham. This gate opens to a 21∕2-mile hike along Old Dana Road to the Dana Common. In an unhurried, unstressed, unwinding space, participants will use late summer woodlands, archeological remains and waterfronts to access deep creativity. For all levels of writing skill. Bring a lunch, tick repellent, journal and pen and something to sit on such as a towel. Maps available at www.mass.gov/eea/docs/dcr/watersupply/watershed/maps/quabsystem.pdf. Call 978-544-2662 and leave a message.

Music

BEATLES FOR SALE, The Shea Theater, 71 Avenue A, Turners Falls. 8 to 10 p.m. $15. According to the website of this New England-based tribute band, “What you will see is a fun and energetic performance complete with original instrumentation and vocal harmonies that are as accurate as possible to the original Beatles recordings. There are no ‘sampling’ or ‘midi tricks,’everything you hear is performed completely live.” Buy tickets online: brownpapertickets.com. 413-863-2281.www.theshea.org.

PIONEER VALLEY JAZZ SHARES presents its first concert of its second season with a concert by Harris Eisenstadt Golden State. 7:30 p.m. Institute for the Musical Arts, Route 112, Goshen. The quartet features Nicole Mitchell, flute; Sara Schoenbeck, bassoon; Mark Dresser, bass, and Harris Eisenstadt, drums. Tickets $15 at www.jazzshares.org and at the door.

WORMTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL continues. See Friday’s listing.

Potpourri

ART WALK IN SHELBURNE FALLS, Bridge and State streets. 4 to 8 p.m. Follow the “decorated shoes” throughout the village. Local artists, demonstrations, live music, community art projects, trolley rides. 413-625-2526

ASHFIELD FARMERS MARKET on Ashfield Town Common. 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. 21 vendors offering a variety of locally grown and locally made farm products. Annual and perennial plants, vegetable starts, organic eggs, mixed greens, flowers, honey, maple syrup, pork, beef, elixirs, full selection of vegetables, hard cider, mead, bread, pastries and coffee. Turkish prepared food, apples, peaches, blueberries and weekly musical entertainment. 625-6365. Every Saturday through October.

CATAMOUNT HILLS HIKE for families. Muriel Russell will lead the hike to, in and around the Devil’s Oven where hikers will have lunch. The hike covers about three-fourths of a mile and takes less than an hour walk. Easy for young children and older adults. to reach the meeting place from route 112 in Griswoldville in Colrain, take the Adamsville Road across the iron bridge to the next bridge across the river to the West Branch Cemetery. Park near the bridge to car pool to the trail head where parking is limited. Meet at the cemetery at 10:45 a.m. Bring lunch, flashlight, water, unscented bug repellent and dress for the weather. Register with Muriel Russell at 624-3311. Offered by the Deerfield River Watershed Association in cooperation with the Colrain Historical Society.

ERVING CASTLE — HERMIT’S CAVE guided tour lead by Harry Sharbaugh, maintainer of the New England Scenic Trail (M&M). 10 a.m. Five mile long hike that will take four to five hours. Children must be at least 12 and accompanied by an adult. Wear appropriate foot attire, hiking boots recommended; bring water, snacks, lunch and bug repellent. Bring cell phones if you wish, but do not use during the hike unless absolutely necessary. Moderately difficult hike with two steep climbs to a natural “castle” formed by a small cave under an overhanging cliff. Registration at the Erving Library, 17 Moore St., Erving, is required. Rain date Sept. 21.

GREAT FALLS DISCOVERY CENTER, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls. ∎ “Watershed Investigators: Build Your Own Water Turbine!” 10:30 a.m. to noon. Monthly kid-oriented program that focuses on hands on discovery of local nature. Join refuge staff as we explore different ways to look at the natural world around us. Methods of discovery may include crafts, games, stories and exploration. Geared toward grades 2 to 5, but all welcome. ∎ Watershed History: The Patch. 2 to 3:30 p.m. A small patch of land sits in the middle of the Connecticut River at Turners Falls — sandwiched between the power canal on one side and the Connecticut River on the other. The history of “the Patch” is the story of industrialization, immigration, fish, birds, rocks, resilience and more. Explore many of these stories during a leisurely stroll through the little neighborhood with eight streets and paths through the woods and views. Meet at Avenue A and 11th Street near the canal side bike path.

GREENFIELD SAVINGS BANK, 325 King St., Northampton: Apple festival. Kick off fall with a sampling of apples, cider and apple dessert bake-off featuring treats from local Northampton restaurants.

GREENFIELD FARMERS MARKET at Court Square, Greenfield. 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 25 vendors offering a variety of locally grown and produced farm products and locally made crafts. Starter vegetable plants hanging baskets, perennial and annual flower plants, herb plants and culinary herbs, mixed greens, baby spinach, microgreens, honey, maple syrup, homemade jams, fresh-baked breads, cookies, grass-fed lamb, beef, goat and pork, locally raised poultry and, new this year, sustainable Cape Cod fish and more. Check the website at www.greenfieldfarmersmarket.com for vendors, entertainment and events at the market. Every Saturday through fall.

THE HAPPIER VALLEY COMEDY SHOW, The Ha Ha’s & Playbook, The Arts Block, 289 Main St., Greenfield. 8 p.m $7 in advance, $10 a the door. Here is what promotors have to say, “The Ha-Ha’s and their special guests from Boston, the acclaimed show Playbook perform improvised comic theater that will have you astounded and amazed like you’ve never been before.” Rated PG-13. Handicapped accessible. These comedy shows come to the Arts Block on the second Saturday of every month.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD:
∎ “From Nature to Color: Fun with Natural Dyes,” a family activity. Noon to 4:30 p.m. Drop in any time for the history workshop. Flower blossoms, leaves, roots, bark, nuts and insects have been used to infuse fabric with brilliant color. The science of natural dyeing is knowing how to harvest and process these materials and how to make dye recipes using mordant to bind color to fiber. Experiment using dye plants harvested from the Historic Deerfield garden such as marigolds and coreopsis, and things collected from the wild such as sumac and black walnuts. As you learn about the colors used in colonial dye pots, you can dye a small cloth bag to take home. Repeats Sunday and Sept. 21, 22, 28 and 29. ∎ Open Hearth Cooking Demonstrations: Foods of the Fall Harvest in Hall Tavern Kitchen. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Late summer and autumn were busy times in early American kitchens. The abundance of fresh produce needed to be processed and preserved for the winter. The cooks will be cooking dishes featuring apples, pumpkins and corn. Repeats Sept. 21 and 28.

LEFTY’S BREWING CO, 301 Wells St., Greenfield. ∎ Weekly brewery tour. 2 to 4 p.m., Free to those 21 and over. ∎ Lefty’s Fest and Customer Appreciation Day. 3:30 to 11 p.m. at Kiwanis Park in Bernardston. “Beer-lympics” games at 4:30 (register from 3:30 to 4:15), music from Ruby’s Complaint and Scott Kusmeskus, food, dancing, raffles, games, prizes and more, plus the debut of two new brews, Lefty’s Honey Brown Ale and Oktoberfest. All pints $3. Tickets $3 advance, $5 door. For more information, call 475-3449, www.leftysbrew.com.

WESLEY STACE AND THE ENGLISH UK, formerly John Wesley Harding. 7 p.m. the Parlor Room at Signature Sounds, 32 Masonic St., Northampton. 665-4036, flora@signaturesounds.com.

Theater

“THE BEAUTY QUEEN OF LEENANE” continues. See Thursday’s listing.

“BREATH OF LIFE,” a staged reading of David Hare’s play. 7:30 p.m. Actors Theatre Playhouse, Brook and Main streets, West Chesterfield, N.H. Shoshana Rihn and Terri Storti as two women with a common need to confront their “shared” past. What they shared was one man. All tickets $6. Reservations not required. 877-666-1855, www.atplayhouse.org.

“COUNTY FAIR” 1794 Meetinghouse, New Salem. 7:30 p.m. Community musical in which the stage, auditorium, vestibule and lawn will transform into a 1939 fairgrounds replete with chorus and a parade of engaging characters straight out of pre-war lore. Featuring a 50-member cast directed by Dorothy Johnson and Andy Lichtenberg, who say this is their 10th and last collaboration. These performances are unique in that roles are created for anyone who wants to participate. There are no auditions for parts. The show concludes Sunday. $10 adults and seniors; free for children 12 and under. Tickets available at the door or at www.1794meetinghouse.org, at New Salem General Store, and Bruce’s Browser, 1497 Main St., Athol.

“THE LITTLE MERMAID JR.” presented by The Ja’Duke Center for the Performing Arts at Yankee Candle Theater, Routes 5 & 10, South Deerfield. 11 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Performances continue Sunday at 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Lunch with Ariel and friends available in between shows at Chandler’s Restaurant. For reservations and prcing for lunch with Ariel and Friends call 665-1277. Performance tickets $12 adults, $10 children 12 and under and seniors 65 and older. The show is approximately 70 minutes long. For tickets: www.jaduke.com/shows or reserve tickets by calling 863-9901.

Sunday 15

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. NFL Sunday Ticket, every game on 14 HDTVS, BTU Prize Wheel, chances to win every quarter, food, drink specials, giveaways and more. 863-2882.

DEJA BREW, 57A Lockes Village Road, Wendell: John Sheldon Up Close & Personal. Experience the amazing talent of John Sheldon on guitar. 8 to 10 p.m. 978-544-2739, www.dejabrewpub.com.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: Dicey Riley. The Johnny Memphis Band opens. $10, $13. www.iheg.com.

THE MONTAGUE INN, Route 63, Montague: Free Pool Sunday. 768-7336.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Katie Sachs Farewell Show with Span of Sunshine, Wishbone Zoe, Christa Joy, Carlyn Walker, Lexi Weege and Lisa Marie. 8 p.m. Free. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Red Sox vs. NY Yankees at noon. NFL Sunday Ticket is on at Taylor’s. Watch all your favorite teams on 11 50-inch HDTV’s with Kathy in the Sports Bar and Erinn downstairs in the Tavern. Patriots vs. Bills at 1 p.m. Free pool all night with Big Dan in the sports Bar. 773-8313.

Dance

CONTRA DANCE AND POT-LUCK supper at Montague Common Hall (formerly the Montague Grange), Main Street, Montague Center. Potluck at 6 p.m.; dancing begins at 7 p.m. with lively music provided by the All-comers Band. Dance instruction and calling by caller and fiddler David Kaynor. Admission by donation. All proceeds will help pay the running expense of the hall. Dancers encouraged to bring soft-soled shoes. For more information, contact Tim Van Egmond at 367-9304,

www.montaguecommonhall.org.

Films

“2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY” at Amherst Cinema, 28 Amity St., Amherst. 2 p.m. Part of the month-long Kubrick Film Festival. The director’s 1968 meditation on the complex relationship between humanity and technology. Regualr admission. Repeats Tuesday at 7 p.m. www.amherstcinema.org.

Music

CONTINUUM, An Evening of Music for Brass Instruments and Piano, a UMass Department of Music and Dance Faculty recital. 8 p.m. Bezanson Recital Hall, Umass, Amherst. Featuring Eric Berlin, trumpet; Greg Spiridopoulos, trombone and Ludmila Krasin, piano. $3 UMass students; $5 other students, children, seniors; $10 general public; free for UMass music majors and minors. Available at the Fine Arts Center Box Office, 545-2511 or fac.umass.edu/musicanddance.

MISTER G’S BACK-TO-SCHOOL FIESTA CONCERTS, 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. Mister G, children’s musician. New England Youth Theater, 100 Flat St., Brattleboro, Vt. Mister G’s most recent bilingual CD, “Chocolalala,” won a Parents’ Choice Gold Award and is on the Latin Grammy ballot for Best Children’s Recording of 2013. $7, free for children under 1. Tickets sold at the door. For more information, please email info@mistergsongs.com. www.mistergsongs.com.

SHAPE NOTE SINGING: Participatory singing for all ages. 3 to 5:30 p.m. Centre Congregational Church parlor, 193 Main St., Brattleboro, Vt. Shape note singing is powerful, a capella singing in four part harmony — joyful, deeply moving and spiritual. Using a form of musical notation developed in New England around 1800, singers first sing through the notes using their syllable names. Listeners, beginners and people of all ages invited. No musical experience necessary. Sing from the Sacred Harp and Northern Harmony; books available to use. Potluck snack shared. Free. Open to all. Parking on the street or behind the church.

WORMTOWN MUSIC FESTIVAL concludes. See Friday’s listing.

Potpourri

THE ERIC CARLE MUSEUM OF PICTURE BOOK ART, 125 West Bay Road, Amherst, celebrates International Dot Day with its creator Peter H. Reynolds. 1 to 4 p.m. The festive event is inspired by Reynolds’ book “The Dot” which encourages children and adults to unleash their inner creativity through reading, art and more. Films, story times and a presentation and book signing with Peter H. Reynolds. Activities free with museum admission. 658-1100.

GREAT FALLS DISCOVERY CENTER, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls: Canal-Side Nature and History Walk. 8:30 to 9:30 a.m. Meet outside the main entrance. Leisurely explore level, paved bike trails to learn about plants, animals, and mill town history. Bring water, bug repellent and sunscreen. Repeats Sept. 22, 29. 863-3676.

OPEN HOUSE at Colrain Historical Museum in Colrain featuring special exhibits of Catamount Hill interest. 2 to 5 p.m. The exhibit includes maps, documents, pictures and materials on loan and from museum collection. The materials cover a broad range of activities that the people of the Catamount Hills experienced during their daily lives. Muriel Russell will be on hand to answer questions. Reprints of the 1901 Catamount Hill Association book will be available for $15.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD: “From Nature to Color: Fun with Natural Dyes” continues. See Saturday’s listing.

Theater

“COUNTY FAIR” concludes. See Saturday’s listing.

“THE LITTLE MERMAID JR.” concludes. See Saturday’s listing.

Monday 16

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Monday Night Football. Steelers at Bengals 8:30 p.m. Enter to win MNF season-long prize contest, Bud Light draft specials and more. 863-2882.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Bingo@ 8 p.m. Free. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Red Sox vs. Baltimore at 7 p.m. NFL Football, Steelers vs. Bengals at 8:30 p.m. on 11 50-inch HDTVs. Free pool all night in the sports bar. Country music with Host Kathy and her candy bowl. Monday Madness with Big Dan in the Sports Bar.773-8313.

Library

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: ∎ Sunshine Story Time. 10 a.m. Kay Lyons brings a blend of read aloud, sing along, play along fun to families with young children. 772-1544 Ext. 5, www.greenfieldpubliclibrary.org. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. the library’s meeting room will be open each Monday through Thursday from noon to 2 p.m. for Writer’s Lunch. Self directed free writing time open to any writer who is looking for a place to work through their lunch. Contact Jane Buchanana at 772-1544 for more details. ∎ Open for Business. 2 to 5 p.m. Telecommuters and local business people looking for reliable WiFi and a quiet workspace invited to the library’s LeVanway Meeting room Mondays and Fridays. Access to the room is free and open to all who need a space to work.

Speakers

PELHAM HOLLOW: The Talk. 7 p.m. Community Center of Pelham, Ramsdell Room. Pelham Hollow was a vital section of Pelham that was taken for the creation of the Quabbin Reservoir. It included a factory and charcoal kilns. Recollections from attendees, oral histories and other documents. Presented by Kathy Keyes and Julie Ryznic.

Tuesday 17

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Two free games of pool with each pitcher of beer. Red Sox vs. Orioles at 7 p.m. on 14 HDTVs. 863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: 10 p.m. Latin Dance Night. No cover. www.iheg.com.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Nora and Martha’s Open Microphone. 8 p.m. (7:30 sign ups). Free. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield: Red Sox vs. Baltimore at 7 p.m. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. Trivia at 7 p.m. Open Beer Pong tournament with Megan starts at 9 p.m.
773-8313.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Preschool story hour and craft time fun. Meet other peple with small children and enjoy stories, songs, fingerplays and crafts with Sally Ahearn. 10 to 11 a.m. In the LeVanway Meeting Room. No sign up required. Free. For more information, call the children’s librarian at 772-1544 Ext. 5. ∎ Classics Book Group. 6:30 to 8 p.m. This session the group is reading works by George Eliot. September’s book is Silas Marner. No sign up for this member run group.

Literary

GREENFIELD WORD, 9 Mill St., Greenfield. Every Third Tuesday of the month. Doors open at 7 p.m. Open mic at 7:30 p.m. $1 to $5 sliding scale. 10 slots, each 5 minutes long. www.humanerrorpublishing.com/

Music

CALVIN THEATER, 19 King St., Northampton: Michael Franti and Spearhead in concert. The Kopecky Family band opens. 8 p.m. $39.50. www.iheg.com.

GIRLS GUNS AND GLORY play tribute to Hank Williams. With Sarah Borges. 7 p.m. The Parlor Room at Signature Sounds, 32 Masonic St., Northampton. $15. 665-4036, flora@signaturesounds.com.

Potpourri

GREAT FALLS DISCOVERY CENTER, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls: Kidleidoscope! 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Kid-friendly environmental experience for young children. Each topic is based on the theme “we share our home” and includes story, interactive games, craft activities to help children explore the natural world. For ages 3 to 6, accompanied by an adult. This month’s topics include: snakes, raptors, bats and squirrels. Repeats Sept. 24.

Speakers

DANIEL BOTKIN, manager of Laughing Dog Farm in Gill, will speak about Backyard Permaculture at the Historical Society of Greenfield, 43 Church St., Greenfield. 7 p.m. Backyard permaculture seeks to integrate the concepts and practices of ecological design with practical four-season food production, even on marginal land or in small spaces. He will describe innovative “guerilla gardening” and season extension techniques that he has honed on his five-acre lot, including low-till vertical farming and winter tunnels. For more than 10 years, Botkin and his wife, Divya, have been hand-raising diverse produce, flowers, herbs, fruits, rabbits and goats. They operate a small CSA and teach a variety of do-it-yourself farming and food-oriented workshops from the farm and beyond. Free; voluntary donations gratefully accepted at the door. There will be time after the presentation for questions and conversation.

Wednesday 18

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Hump Night Karaoke with Dirty Johnny at 9 p.m. Plus Red Sox. vs Orioles at 7 p.m. on 14 HDTVs. No cover. 863-2882.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Quiznite with Quizmaster Alex. 8 p.m. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Red Sox vs Baltimore at 7 p.m. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. Restaurant Appreciation Night. Come in wearing your work shirt or show a pay stub and receive a special prize from Big Dan in the Sports Bar. Free pool for bar/restaurant employees. Sign up for complimentary prizes and giveaways. 773-8313.

Dance

LINE DANCING at the Moose Lodge, 20 School St., Greenfield. 7 to 10 p.m. Beginner to intermediate. Ring the doorbell for admittance. $5 per session. Beginner lessons at 7 p.m. Intermediate at 8. For more information, call Pat at 665-4260, jokellogg@aol.com.

Library

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. The library’s meeting room will be open Monday through Thursday for a Writer’s Lunch. This is a self0directed free writing time open to any writer who is looking for a place to work through their luncyh. Bring your own lunch and beverage and stop in for all or part of Writer’s Lunch. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details. www.greenfieldpubliclibrary.org.

Potpourri

GREAT FALLS FARMERS MARKET, Avenue A and Second Street, Turners Falls, next to the Great Falls Discovery Center. 2 to 6 p.m. Fresh in-season local produce, perennials, annuals, vegetable plants, crafts and baked goods. Entertainment is frequently provided. Rain or shine. More information on Facebook.

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