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Arts & Entertainment Calendar: May 23 to May 29

  • Gregory Thorp photo<br/>‘Dead Man’s Cell Phone’ opens Friday<br/>For more than 15 years, Ashfield Community Theater has been staging productions that tap into the theatrical talents — be it acting, stage design, lighting, you name it — of our friends and neighbors. This time around, the company is offering Sarah Ruhl’s “Dead Man’s Cell Phone,” which premiered in 2007. The winner of a Helen Hayes Award for outstanding new play, “Dead Man’s Cell Phone” begins with Jean (unmarried, no children, approaching 40, an employee at the Holocaust museum) becoming annoyed at the constant ringing of a cell phone in a cafe. It turns out its owner has died and when Jean answers the phone, she makes a fateful decision: she tells the caller he’s not available and then asks “Can I take a message?” We won’t get into any spoilers here, but will quote some reviewers: “Ruhl’s zany probe of the razor-thin line between life and death delivers a fresh and humorous look at the times we live in,” Variety; “Her affection for the unexpected phrase, the kooky observation, the unlikely juxtaposition is essential to her central belief that the smallest and most trivial things in life ... can be charged with meaning. And her characters’ quirkiness is in keeping, too, with the play’s doleful central theme, that each human being is a book full of surprises even to intimates, and one that is destined to be left unfinished,” New York Times. So, to sum up, it’s funny, thought provoking and being staged by a company with a proven track record. The play opens Friday and runs two weekends. See “Theater.” Pictured above, Tom Kokonowski as Gordon and Elissa Gallup as Jean.

    Gregory Thorp photo
    ‘Dead Man’s Cell Phone’ opens Friday
    For more than 15 years, Ashfield Community Theater has been staging productions that tap into the theatrical talents — be it acting, stage design, lighting, you name it — of our friends and neighbors. This time around, the company is offering Sarah Ruhl’s “Dead Man’s Cell Phone,” which premiered in 2007. The winner of a Helen Hayes Award for outstanding new play, “Dead Man’s Cell Phone” begins with Jean (unmarried, no children, approaching 40, an employee at the Holocaust museum) becoming annoyed at the constant ringing of a cell phone in a cafe. It turns out its owner has died and when Jean answers the phone, she makes a fateful decision: she tells the caller he’s not available and then asks “Can I take a message?” We won’t get into any spoilers here, but will quote some reviewers: “Ruhl’s zany probe of the razor-thin line between life and death delivers a fresh and humorous look at the times we live in,” Variety; “Her affection for the unexpected phrase, the kooky observation, the unlikely juxtaposition is essential to her central belief that the smallest and most trivial things in life ... can be charged with meaning. And her characters’ quirkiness is in keeping, too, with the play’s doleful central theme, that each human being is a book full of surprises even to intimates, and one that is destined to be left unfinished,” New York Times. So, to sum up, it’s funny, thought provoking and being staged by a company with a proven track record. The play opens Friday and runs two weekends. See “Theater.” Pictured above, Tom Kokonowski as Gordon and Elissa Gallup as Jean.

  • Submitted photo<br/>Want to help a shape a documentary?<br/>Local filmmaker Steve Alves has been working on a major project for some time now. Called “Food For Change,” it will be a feature-length documentary that Alves tells us focuses on “food co-ops as a force for social and economic change in American culture.” The film is now in rough-cut form and runs 90 minutes. Before finalizing it, Alves has scheduled two screenings in hopes of gathering audience feedback. This is where you come in. They are scheduled for this Friday and next Friday at Green Fields Market, 144 Main St., Greenfield, at 5:30 p.m. See “Films” for more information.

    Submitted photo
    Want to help a shape a documentary?
    Local filmmaker Steve Alves has been working on a major project for some time now. Called “Food For Change,” it will be a feature-length documentary that Alves tells us focuses on “food co-ops as a force for social and economic change in American culture.” The film is now in rough-cut form and runs 90 minutes. Before finalizing it, Alves has scheduled two screenings in hopes of gathering audience feedback. This is where you come in. They are scheduled for this Friday and next Friday at Green Fields Market, 144 Main St., Greenfield, at 5:30 p.m. See “Films” for more information.

  • COMEDY NIGHT, RELAY FOR LIFE — Local comedian Ellen Villani, free beer or wine with ticket. $10 suggested donation. All raffles and admission donations directly benefit Relay for Life. Thursday, 5:30 to 8 p.m. Show begins at 6:30 p.m. Terrazza, Country Club of Greenfield, 244 Country Club Road. 413-522-0712.

    COMEDY NIGHT, RELAY FOR LIFE — Local comedian Ellen Villani, free beer or wine with ticket. $10 suggested donation. All raffles and admission donations directly benefit Relay for Life. Thursday, 5:30 to 8 p.m. Show begins at 6:30 p.m. Terrazza, Country Club of Greenfield, 244 Country Club Road. 413-522-0712.

  • COFFEE AND POETRY at Northfield Coffee and Books, 105 Main St., Northfield. Featured reader Mary Clare Powell. 7:30 p.m. She is a writer of prose and poetry, a photographer and an arts educator (someone who teaches teachers how to integrate all of the arts into their curriculum, regardless of age or subject). Her poetry books include “Things Owls Ate” (1991), “Academic Scat” (poems about academia) (1995), and a chapbook “In the Living Room” (poems about aging). There will also be an open mic. All encouraged to bring something to read. 498-0095, <br/>www.coffeeandbooks.net, <br/>www.maryclarepowell.com.<br/>

    COFFEE AND POETRY at Northfield Coffee and Books, 105 Main St., Northfield. Featured reader Mary Clare Powell. 7:30 p.m. She is a writer of prose and poetry, a photographer and an arts educator (someone who teaches teachers how to integrate all of the arts into their curriculum, regardless of age or subject). Her poetry books include “Things Owls Ate” (1991), “Academic Scat” (poems about academia) (1995), and a chapbook “In the Living Room” (poems about aging). There will also be an open mic. All encouraged to bring something to read. 498-0095,
    www.coffeeandbooks.net,
    www.maryclarepowell.com.

  • Recorder/Paul Franz<br/>All aboard!<br/>The Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum begins its summer season this Memorial Day Weekend. See Saturday’s “Potpourri” for more details. Pictured, Lorelei Kanzler, in pink, Luke Scotera and Haylei Peters of the Discovery School at Four Corners explore the cupula of the caboose at the Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum on Tuesday.

    Recorder/Paul Franz
    All aboard!
    The Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum begins its summer season this Memorial Day Weekend. See Saturday’s “Potpourri” for more details. Pictured, Lorelei Kanzler, in pink, Luke Scotera and Haylei Peters of the Discovery School at Four Corners explore the cupula of the caboose at the Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum on Tuesday.

  • Submitted photo<br/>Tents & tents of art<br/>The Paradise City Arts Festival returns to Northampton this Memorial Day Weekend with the jurried work of hundreds of artists and craftsmen, some of them from our area, including potter Maya Machin, whose work is pictured here. If you go, you’ll find many beautiful things to marvel at, in addition to live music and fine food. See Saturday’s “Potpourri’ listing for more details.  <br/>"Misty Sunrise" Vessel, wood fired, salt glazed wheel thrown stoneware. 13" x 8".<br/>Ashfield, MA 01330;Ceramics

    Submitted photo
    Tents & tents of art
    The Paradise City Arts Festival returns to Northampton this Memorial Day Weekend with the jurried work of hundreds of artists and craftsmen, some of them from our area, including potter Maya Machin, whose work is pictured here. If you go, you’ll find many beautiful things to marvel at, in addition to live music and fine food. See Saturday’s “Potpourri’ listing for more details.
    "Misty Sunrise" Vessel, wood fired, salt glazed wheel thrown stoneware. 13" x 8".
    Ashfield, MA 01330;Ceramics

  • DEENA CHAPPELL AND FRIENDS, Ashfield Community Hall, Main Street, Ashfield. Friday, 7 p.m. Expect swingy, bluesy, sweet, sassy songs with guitar, mandolin and cello, say promoters, who add, “Attending a Deena Chappell performance is always entertaining, touching, thought provoking, and fun.  Deena interacts with her audiences through honesty, humility and humor.” $10 to $20. Benefit for Silvery Moon Golden Slippers Musicians Workshop.

    DEENA CHAPPELL AND FRIENDS, Ashfield Community Hall, Main Street, Ashfield. Friday, 7 p.m. Expect swingy, bluesy, sweet, sassy songs with guitar, mandolin and cello, say promoters, who add, “Attending a Deena Chappell performance is always entertaining, touching, thought provoking, and fun. Deena interacts with her audiences through honesty, humility and humor.” $10 to $20. Benefit for Silvery Moon Golden Slippers Musicians Workshop.

  • Gregory Thorp photo<br/>‘Dead Man’s Cell Phone’ opens Friday<br/>For more than 15 years, Ashfield Community Theater has been staging productions that tap into the theatrical talents — be it acting, stage design, lighting, you name it — of our friends and neighbors. This time around, the company is offering Sarah Ruhl’s “Dead Man’s Cell Phone,” which premiered in 2007. The winner of a Helen Hayes Award for outstanding new play, “Dead Man’s Cell Phone” begins with Jean (unmarried, no children, approaching 40, an employee at the Holocaust museum) becoming annoyed at the constant ringing of a cell phone in a cafe. It turns out its owner has died and when Jean answers the phone, she makes a fateful decision: she tells the caller he’s not available and then asks “Can I take a message?” We won’t get into any spoilers here, but will quote some reviewers: “Ruhl’s zany probe of the razor-thin line between life and death delivers a fresh and humorous look at the times we live in,” Variety; “Her affection for the unexpected phrase, the kooky observation, the unlikely juxtaposition is essential to her central belief that the smallest and most trivial things in life ... can be charged with meaning. And her characters’ quirkiness is in keeping, too, with the play’s doleful central theme, that each human being is a book full of surprises even to intimates, and one that is destined to be left unfinished,” New York Times. So, to sum up, it’s funny, thought provoking and being staged by a company with a proven track record. The play opens Friday and runs two weekends. See “Theater.” Pictured above, Tom Kokonowski as Gordon and Elissa Gallup as Jean.
  • Submitted photo<br/>Want to help a shape a documentary?<br/>Local filmmaker Steve Alves has been working on a major project for some time now. Called “Food For Change,” it will be a feature-length documentary that Alves tells us focuses on “food co-ops as a force for social and economic change in American culture.” The film is now in rough-cut form and runs 90 minutes. Before finalizing it, Alves has scheduled two screenings in hopes of gathering audience feedback. This is where you come in. They are scheduled for this Friday and next Friday at Green Fields Market, 144 Main St., Greenfield, at 5:30 p.m. See “Films” for more information.
  • COMEDY NIGHT, RELAY FOR LIFE — Local comedian Ellen Villani, free beer or wine with ticket. $10 suggested donation. All raffles and admission donations directly benefit Relay for Life. Thursday, 5:30 to 8 p.m. Show begins at 6:30 p.m. Terrazza, Country Club of Greenfield, 244 Country Club Road. 413-522-0712.
  • COFFEE AND POETRY at Northfield Coffee and Books, 105 Main St., Northfield. Featured reader Mary Clare Powell. 7:30 p.m. She is a writer of prose and poetry, a photographer and an arts educator (someone who teaches teachers how to integrate all of the arts into their curriculum, regardless of age or subject). Her poetry books include “Things Owls Ate” (1991), “Academic Scat” (poems about academia) (1995), and a chapbook “In the Living Room” (poems about aging). There will also be an open mic. All encouraged to bring something to read. 498-0095, <br/>www.coffeeandbooks.net, <br/>www.maryclarepowell.com.<br/>
  • Recorder/Paul Franz<br/>All aboard!<br/>The Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum begins its summer season this Memorial Day Weekend. See Saturday’s “Potpourri” for more details. Pictured, Lorelei Kanzler, in pink, Luke Scotera and Haylei Peters of the Discovery School at Four Corners explore the cupula of the caboose at the Shelburne Falls Trolley Museum on Tuesday.
  • Submitted photo<br/>Tents & tents of art<br/>The Paradise City Arts Festival returns to Northampton this Memorial Day Weekend with the jurried work of hundreds of artists and craftsmen, some of them from our area, including potter Maya Machin, whose work is pictured here. If you go, you’ll find many beautiful things to marvel at, in addition to live music and fine food. See Saturday’s “Potpourri’ listing for more details.  <br/>"Misty Sunrise" Vessel, wood fired, salt glazed wheel thrown stoneware. 13" x 8".<br/>Ashfield, MA 01330;Ceramics
  • DEENA CHAPPELL AND FRIENDS, Ashfield Community Hall, Main Street, Ashfield. Friday, 7 p.m. Expect swingy, bluesy, sweet, sassy songs with guitar, mandolin and cello, say promoters, who add, “Attending a Deena Chappell performance is always entertaining, touching, thought provoking, and fun.  Deena interacts with her audiences through honesty, humility and humor.” $10 to $20. Benefit for Silvery Moon Golden Slippers Musicians Workshop.

Thursday 23

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Open Mic Night hosted by Dan, Kip and Schultzy from Curly Fingers Dupree from 8:30 to 11:30 p.m. plus NHL, NBA Playoffs and Red Sox vs. Indians on 14 HDTVs. No cover. 413-863-2882.

DEJA BREW, 57A Lockes Village Road, Wendell. “The Surly Temple” 8 to 10 p.m. Jim Henry, Guy DeVito, Doug Plavin and, of course, Tommy Boynton. 978-544-BREW.
http://dejabrewpub.com/

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Bear Country Pub Crawl Country Music Concert tickets drawing. Red Sox vs Cleveland at 7 p.m. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. Thirsty Thursdays and college night hosted by Big Dan in the Sports Bar. Beer Pong Tournament. Wear your college shirt or show your college ID to be entered in end-of-the-night prizes. 773-8313.

Film

“FIELD OF DREAMS” will be shown at 8:30 p.m., Peskeomskut Park, downtown Turners Falls. The park will be open for seating beginning at 6:30 p.m. Benefit for the Boston One Fund for victims and families of those most impacted by the Boston Marathon attacks. Rain location will be The Shea Theater, Avenue A, Turners Falls. Admission free with a suggested donation of $5 per adult. All money collected will go directly to the fund.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Knitting Circle at the Greenfield Public Library, 10 a.m. Bring your project to the LeVanway Meeting Room and join with other knitters to talk about knitting, crafts, and books. Free. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. the library’s meeting room will be open each Monday through Friday for a Writer’s Lunch. This is a self-directed free writing time open to any writer who is looking for a place to work through lunch. Bring your own lunch and beverage. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details.

Literary

COFFEE AND POETRY at Northfield Coffee and Books, 105 Main St., Northfield. Featured reader Mary Clare Powell. She is a writer of prose and poetry, a photographer and an arts educator (someone who teaches teachers how to integrate all of the arts into their curriculum, regardless of age or subject). Her poetry books include “Things Owls Ate” (1991), “Academic Scat” (poems about academia) (1995), and a chapbook “In the Living Room” (poems about aging). There will also be an open mic. All encouraged to bring something to read. 498-0095,
www.coffeeandbooks.net,
www.maryclarepowell.com.

Music

MARINA RESTAURANT, Route 5, Brattleboro, Vt. Kevin Parry hosts open mic every Thursday from 7 to 10 p.m. To sign up for a 20 minute slot, call 802-257-7563. For more information, visit www.kevinparrymusic.com.

THE MONTAGUE BOOKMILL, 440 Greenfield Road, Montague: The E theory Band, a talented and creative group of musicians from Pioneer Valley Regional School, Northfield. 8 p.m. the group is influenced by jazz, blues, rock and funk styles to name a few. Free. 367-9206,
www.montaguebookmill.com.

Potpourri

COMEDY NIGHT, RELAY FOR LIFE — Local comedian Ellen Villani, free beer or wine with ticket. $10 suggested donation. All raffles and admission donations directly benefit Relay for Life. 5:30 to 8 p.m. Show begins at 6:30 p.m. Terrazza, Country Club of Greenfield, 244 Country Club Road. 413-522-0712.

MUSIC & MOVEMENT at Montague Center Library, Montague Center. With Tom Carroll and Laurie Davidson. 10 a.m. Young children of all ages and their parents or caregivers invited to the free program. Thursdays through June.

Theater

“DEATHTRAP” presented by Vermont Theatre Co. at Evening Star Grange, Dummerston, Vt. 7:30 p.m. The play continues Friday and Saturday at 7:30 p.m., and Sunday a at 3 p.m. the story of a famous writer of comic thrillers who tries to break out of a career slump by taking the manuscript of a former student of his and calling it his own. $12 general admission, $10 seniors and students. From Interstate 91 Exit 3: Travel North on Route 5 for about 1 mile. Bear left onto the Middle Road. Proceed 3.7 miles on this winding, climbing road to Dummerston Center to the “Stop” sign. This is the junction of the East-West Road and the Middle Road. The grange is on the right. For reservations, call 802-258-1344 or email vtcreservations@gmail.com.

Friday 24

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Grillin’ Meats Raffle from 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. Friday Night Karaoke with “Dirty Johnny” from 9 p.m. until midnight, plus NBA, NHL Playoffs and Red Sox vs. Indians on 14 HDTVs. No cover. 413-863-2882.

DEJA BREW, 57A Lockes Village Road,Wendell, Zydeco Connection, 9 to 11 p.m. The band says, “Come on out, shake it loose and party down to some hot zydeco. We are a dance band serving up a spicy gumbo of Louisiana zydeco, blues, two-steps, waltzes and boogie woogie, guaranteed to get your toes tapping.” Lil’Cyn on accordion, Eileen Almeida on rubboard and lead vocals, Mike Rose on drums, Dave LeBlanc on bass and Rolland LaPierre on guitar.No cover but tips appreciated.

EXTRA POINT NIGHTCLUB (located next to Between The Uprights), 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Come dance to Top 40, dance, hip-hop plus favorites from the past decade with DJ MIA from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. No cover. 413-863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: ∎ 7 p.m. Paul Kelly. Dan Kelly opens. $15, $18. ∎ 10 p.m. Roadkill Ghost Choir and Dead Confederate. $10, $13. www.iheg.com.

PEARL STREET CLUBROOM, 10 Pearl St., Northampton: 8:30 p.m. Andrew Nickatina. Mumbls and Roach Gigz opens. $15, $18. www.iheg.com.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Hobson’s Razor. Reggae, rock, funk. 9:30 p.m. $3. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

ROUTE 63 ROADHOUSE, 32 Federal St., Millers Falls: Roogaroos. Classic rock. 9:30 p.m.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, Main Street, Greenfield: Red Sox vs. Cleveland at 7 p.m. Friday night madness with Big Dan in the sports bar. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. 773-8313.

Coffeehouses

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: Eli Elkus. 8 p.m. Upcoming singer/songwriter/storyteller from the seacoast of New Hampshire. He writes and plays acoustic music ranging in genres, such as folk, Americana and Indie. As a gifted lyricist, Eli sings (and sometimes talks) his audience through his meditations on karma, reflections on materialism, twisted tales of love, apparent flaws in ideology, faithful accounts of his dreams and surfing, say the folks at Mocha Maya’s. Free; please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Dance

AMHERST INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: Every Friday night, 7:30 to 10 p.m. Bangs Community Center, Boltwood Walk, Amherst Center. Dances from the Balkans, Middle Eastern Europe, more. You need not bring a partner. Live music first Fridays of the month. Some teaching. Beginners welcome. Donation. 549-6748.
www.amherstfolkdancing.org.

FOURTH FRIDAY CONTRA DANCE, Guiding Star Grange, 401 Chapman St., Greenfield, 8 to 11 p.m. The Squirrel Hunters (a.k.a. “The Gig Hunters”: Stuart Kenney (bass/banjo) with guitarist Eric MacDonald and fiddler Julie Metcalf. Caller TBA. Sit-ins welcome. Self-determined free will contribution; $10 suggested, barter welcome. www.guidingstargrange.org/

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Mother Goose on the Loose. 11 a.m. Join the happy circle with Kay Lyons at a lap-sit story hour for children age 3 and under. Rhymes, songs and movement games make up this story time style popularized by author Betsy Diamant-Cohen. ∎ Writers’ Workshop. Noon to 2 p.m. Fridays. Jane Buchanan and Joannah Whitney lead the program, which includes writing exercises and discussion and an opportunity to share what has been written. Participants encouraged to attend the open writing periods during the week as well. No charge and registration not required. Contact Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details. ∎ Open for Business. 2 p.m. Reliable WiFi and a quiet workspace in the LeVanway Meeting room Mondays and Fridays from 2 to 5 p.m.

Films

WORK-IN PROGRESS SCREENINGS, “Food For Change: A Documentary Film About Cooperation in America,” Friday and May 31, 5:30 p.m., Green Fields Market, Main Street, Greenfield. Filmmaker Steve Alves will show a rough cut of his new film. “Food For Change” is a feature-length work-in-progress documentary focusing on food co-ops as a force for social and economic change in American culture. The movie tells the story of the cooperative movement in the U.S. from the Great Depression to the present with a focus on consumer food co-ops — their pioneering quest for organic food and their efforts to create regional food systems. The film also shows how co-ops build communities, strengthen local economies, and create food security. The goal is to educate a national audience about cooperative principles and practices. A 15-minute excerpt from the film was shown at the United Nation last fall where it was given an award. The entire film is now in rough-cut form and runs 90 minutes. Alves would like to get some reactions to the film before making the final edition. www.foodforchange.coop

Music

THE ARTS BLOCK, 289 Main St., Greenfield. ∎ Galina & Alexey Homchik, Russian Folk Music. 7 to 8:30 p.m. $7 in advance, $10 at the door. The Arts Block says, “Galina Homchik, one of the most famous Russian bard-singers and winner of many musical festivals in the former USSR and Russia performs with her son Alexey.” ∎ Bow Thayer & Perfect Trainwreck, 9 p.m. $7 in advance, $10 at the door. Promoters say, “Bow Thayer & Perfect Trainwreck won the Boston Rock ‘n Roll Rumble in 2012, were named Performer of the Year by a Southern Vermont alternative monthly Cider Magazine and were nominated as Best Rock Group at this year’s New England Music Awards.” theartsblock.com.

DEENA CHAPPELL AND FRIENDS, Ashfield Community Hall, Main Street, Ashfield. 7 p.m. Expect swingy, bluesy, sweet, sassy songs with guitar, mandolin and cello, say promoters, who add, “Attending a Deena Chappell performance is always entertaining, touching, thought provoking, and fun. Deena interacts with her audiences through honesty, humility and humor.” $10 to $29. Benefit for Silvery Moon Golden Slippers Musicians Workshop.

MONTAGUE BOOKMILL, 440 Greenfield Road, Montague: 8 p.m. The Dire Honeys, a trio of sometimes sweet, sometimes salty ladies. Clear harmonies and raw, unabashed melodies backed by mandolin, guitar, tenor, banjo, drum, flute and fiddle. Catfox, two wild animals pretending to be one human girl. Wes Buckley, music between spacey and country, original material. $6. 367-9206, www.montaguebookmill.com.

PUTNEY VAUDEVILLE at Next Stage, 15 Kimball Hill, Putney, Vt. 7:30 p.m. The night will include The Real McCoy, comic performer who combines circus stunts with lightning-fast wit; house band Gaslight Tinkers will play Afro-pop, funk and reggae. Beer and wine available. $12 general admission, $6 children under 12. For tickets call 802-387-0102 or nextstagearts@gmail.com.

STRANGE CREEK CAMPOUT 2013, Camp Kee-wanee, Greenfield. Friday through Monday. This festival is packed with music, including Max Creek, Ivan Neville’s Dumpstaphunk, Donna the Buffalo, Zach Deputy and many more. Also, three nights of camping. Gates open at 9 a.m. Friday, campgrounds close at 1 p.m. on Monday. Tickets available for $110 through Thursday at several venues, including the Wine Rack and Lit’l Bear’s Den, both in Greenfield. Tickets, including a Sunday day pass for $50 after 9 a.m., will also be sold at the gate. You can get in early on Thursday, after 5 p.m., for an additional $30. http://strangecreekcampout.com.

Potpourri

GREAT FALLS DISCOVERY CENTER, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls: Discovery Hour: “Leaf Out of Winter and Discover Trees.” 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Young children ages 3 to 6 and their parents are invited to join refuge staff discover different things about local wildlife and the places they live. 863-3676.

ROBBINS MEMORIAL CHURCH, 55 Munson St., Greenfield, blueberry pie sale from 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Stop by for a delicious homemade blueberry pie. Sugar-free and unbaked pies are available upon request. To order, please call 413-773-7624.

Theater

“ALL MY SONS” by Arthur Miller presented by Deerfield Academy Theater. 7 p.m. Reid Black Box Studio, Deerfield Academy, Deerfield. Based on a true story, “All My Sons” is set in post-World War II America and examines the relationships between fathers and sons, business ethics, taking responsibility for one’s actions and, ultimately, the price of living the “American Dream.” “All My Sons” first opened in 1947 at the Coronet Theatre in New York City and ran for over 300 performances. It won the New York Drama Critics’ Circle Award and Tony Awards for Best Author and Best Direction of a Play. Repeats Saturday at 4 p.m. Admission is free but due to limited seating, tickets are required. Call 774-1556 or go to deerfield.edu/go/play.

“DEAD MAN’S CELL PHONE.” Ashfield Community Theater, Ashfield Town Hall, 412 Main St. Friday, May 24, Saturday, May 25, Friday, May 31, and Saturday, June 1, all at 7:30 p.m. Written by Sarah Ruhl, directed by Melissa Redwin. A quiet café. Two strangers sitting at separate tables. The relentless ringing of a cell phone. So begins “Dead Man’s Cell Phone,” an eccentric and timely play (for grown-ups) that follows one woman’s loopy journey into a dead man’s life via the only tie she has to him, his cellular telephone. $12 at the door (Friday, opening night, is half price). Or reserve online at ACTh.org. Cast members include Elissa Gallup as Jean, Tom Kokonowski as Gordon, Dan Jarvis as Dwight, Rona Leventhal as Mrs. Gottlieb, Sue Davis as Hermia, Jackie Walsh as the Other Woman and the Stranger, and ensemble members David Knowles, Josh Platt, Leslie Kearsley, Michael Fitzgerald, Julie Sarsynski, and Debra Horton. (Contains adult content and language).

“DEATHTRAP” continues. See Thursday’s listing.

www.academyofmusictheatre.tix.com.

Saturday 25

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, Turners Falls: NBA and NHL Playoffs plus Red Sox vs. Indians on 14 HDTVs. 413-863-2882.

THE CUE BAR, 747 Putney Road, Brattleboro, Vt., DJ Tom Mayo, 9 p.m. to 2 a.m. No cover. Free pool tables all night. Menu until midnight. Every Saturday, 802-579-1785.

DEJA BREW, 57A Lockes Village Road, Wendell. Ottomatic Slim, 9 to 11:30 p.m., Chicago Style Blues. 978-544-BREW. http://dejabrewpub.com/

EXTRA POINT NIGHTCLUB (located next to Between The Uprights), 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Dance to the top songs of today and the past decade with DJ J-ill from 10 p.m. to 1 a.m. No cover. 413-863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: ∎ 7 p.m. Jeff Pitchell and Texas Flood. $15 and $18. ∎ 10 p.m. The Sun Parade. $10, $13. www.iheg.com.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Frost Heaves, Original Cowards (indie). 9:30 p.m. Free. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

THE ROUTE 63 ROADHOUSE, Millers Falls: Reprobates. Blues and rock ’n’ roll. 9:30 p.m. www.route63roadhouse.com

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield: Red Sox vs Cleveland at 1:30 p.m. Saturday night madness with Tyler downstairs in Taylor’s Tavern. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. 773-8313.

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: 7:30 p.m. Singer-songwriter Christa Joy weaves compelling melodies with thoughtful lyrics, finding meaning and magic in everyday life. Also Fireseed featuring Crystalline Ruby Muse on fiddle, vocals, Irish whistle and percussion, and Danie Pac on piano, double bass, vocals and percussion. Rousing and soulful Celtic, Appalachian and original dance tunes and songs. Free; please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Dance

TOPHILL MUSIC MEMORIAL DAY WEEKEND EXTRAVADANCE, Guiding Star Grange, 401 Chapman St., Greenfield, 6:30 p.m. to midnight. Extra waltzing (6:30 to 7 p.m.), and extra dancing. Riptide from Portland, Maine (Alden Robinson, fiddle; Owen Marshall, guitar and harmonium; and Glen Loper on mandolin) and Tidal Wave (Sabin Jacques, accordion; Eric Favreau, fiddle;Rachel Aucoin, piano; and Stuart Kenney upright bass and five-string banjo).Callers Linda Leslie and Will Mentor. $16.
www.guidingstargrange.or

MONADNOCK TRI-STATE Dance Club at Elm Hall, Durkee Street, Winchester, N.H. Music by Spare Change. 7 to
11 p.m.

Fairs & Festivals

HAYDENVILLE CRAFT FAIR at 3 Grove St., near Haydenville Center. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Craft exhibits and demonstrations. Roger Tincknell will perform. Free admission. Repeats Sunday and Monday. For information, call Marty Phinney craft fair organizer and potter, at 268-3228.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Main Street, Greenfield. The library will be closed today through Monday for Memorial Day weekend. It will reopen Tuesday. www.greenfieldpubliclibrary.org.

Music

AARON NEVILLE in concert at MASS MoCA, 87 Marshall St., North Adams. 8 p.m. Since launching a career with his brothers in the Grammy award-winning family band, The Neville Brothers, Aaron has gone on to have a rich and versatile solo career. Tickets $34, $40. For more information and tickets, go to: www.massmoca.org.

THE ARTS BLOCK, 289 Main St., Greenfield. Pop-Up Concert No. 4 hosted by Daniel Kasnitz, 8 p.m. Come and see who else pops up. $5. theartsblock.com

FISHTANK ENSEMBLE in concert at Signature Sounds, 32 Masonic St., Northampton. 7 p.m. Soulful and eclectic Gypsy, Balkan, Turkish, Greek, hot jazz and their own original music. $12.

H’ART&SOUL PRESENTS: MARC BLACK, The Brickhouse, Third Street, Turners Falls, 1 to 2 p.m. Suggested donation of $10. Children under 17 are free. Organizers say, “Marc Black is an eclectic folk-rocker who carries the Woodstock tradition of dealing with life with all its social and political challenges one song at a time.”

RAY MASON, BALTIC SUN AND FANCY TRASH performs at Luthier’s Co-Op, 108 Cottage St., Easthampton. 7 to 11 p.m. No cover; tips appreciated. 527-6627, www.luthierscoop.com. See Sheryl Hunter’s Sounds Local column Page D4.

STRANGE CREEK CAMPOUT 2013 continues, see Friday’s listing.

Potpourri

GREENFIELD FARMERS MARKET at Court Square, Greenfield. 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 25 vendors offering a variety of locally grown and produced farm products and locally made crafts. Starter vegetable plants hanging baskets, perennial and annual flower plants, herb plants and culinary herbs, mixed greens, baby spinach, microgreens, honey, maple syrup, homemade jams, fresh baked breads, cookies, grass-fed lamb, beef, goat and pork, locally raised poultry and new this year sustainable Cape Cod fish and more. Check the website at www.greenfieldfarmersmarket.com for vendors, entertainment and events at the market. Every Saturday through Fall.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD, 80 Old Main St., Deerfield.
www.historic-deerfield.org, 413-775-7127. ∎ “Three Bags Full: All About Wool.” History Workshop. Every Saturday and Sunday, through June 30. Noon to 4:30 p.m. Drop in any time. From Colonial times to the present, spring has been the season for shearing sheep. Following shearing there is always plenty of wool to be processed and eventually made into clothing, blankets, and other warm necessities for the home. The first step in this process is washing the wool, followed by: picking, carding, spinning and dyeing. Visitors can participate in many of these steps and make a project to take home. Then, with wool in hand, families will be encouraged to follow the wool trail to the Sheldon House and the Apprentices’ Workshop to learn more about the role of wool in early New England Homes. ∎ Open Hearth Cooking Demonstration: Bottom of the Barrel, Visitor Center at Hall Tavern, in the kitchen, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday’s through May 25. Programs included with general admission. Included with general admission: $12 adults, $5 youth (ages 6-17), free for children under 6 and members.

LEVERETT HISTORICAL SOCIETY’S annual Plant, Garden Book and Cook Book Sale. 9 a.m. to noon, Town Hall. Please make book donations at the entryway to the library and plant donations behind town hall (please label all plants).

PARADISE CITY ARTS FESTIVAL, Three County Fairgrounds, 54 Old Ferry Road, Route 9, Northampton. Saturday through Monday. 260 competitively juried artists from 25 states exhibiting original works in ceramics, painting, decorative fiber, art glass, fine furniture, jewelry, leather, metal, mixed media, photography, largescale sculpture, wearable art and wood. All indoors and under tents, rain or shine. Saturday and Sunday: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Adults, $12. Seniors, $10. Students, $8. Three-Day Pass, $15. 12 and under free. Free Parking. Group discounts available. Live music and food under the Festival Dining Tent, International Language Institute Benefit Silent Art Auction, “Trash Talk,” craft demonstrations. 800.511.9725, www.paradisecityarts.com.

RUN ROUND THE MOUNTAIN 5K and 10K races will take place in South Deerfield. For information and registration forms go to www.sugarloafmac.org. Proceeds to benefit VFW Post 3295 and Sugarloaf Mountain Athletic Club. Veterans posted along route at water stations for mutual cheering.

SHELBURNE FALLS TROLLEY MUSEUM, 14 Depot St., will kick of its summer season Memorial Day Weekend. Trolley rides, pump car rides, toy trains and displays will be available from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. every Saturday, Sunday and holiday until Oct. 27. The museum will also be open Mondays from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. in July and August. The museum now features wheelchair access to the trolley. Tickets

are $4 for adults, $2 for children 6 to 12 and free for kids 5 and

under. 413-625-9443. www.sftm.org

YOGA FOR GARDENERS: Noon to 2 p.m. at Community Yoga and Wellness Center, 16 Federal St., 2nd floor, Greenfield. Jo Schneiderman. $20. To register, call 774-4700 or email info@community-yoga.com.

Theater

“ALL MY SONS” concludes. See Friday’s listing.

“DEAD MAN’S CELL PHONE” continues, see Friday’s listing.

“DEATHTRAP” continues. See Thursday’s listing.

Sunday 26

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Crowne Plaza Invitational PGA Tournament, NASCAR from Charlotte Motor Speedway, NBA and NHL Playoffs and Red Sox vs. Indians on 14 HDTVs. 863-2882.

DEJA BREW, 57A Lockes Village Road, Wendell. Back Yard BBQ Bash. Music by Mafanti
6 to 8:30 p.m. Rhythm, Inc., 9 to 11 p.m. BBQ starts at 6 p.m.
978-544-BREW.
http://dejabrewpub.com/

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: 7 p.m. The Deadly Nightshade. Kristen Ford opens. $12.50, $15. www.iheg.com.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: TNT Karaoke. 9 p.m. Free. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Red Sox vs. Cleveland at 1:30 p.m. Free pool all night with Big Dan in the sports Bar. 773-8313.

Dance

BRATTLEBORO MEMORIAL DAY DAWN DANCE at the Gibson Aiken Center, 207 Main St., Brattleboro, Vt. Contra dance begins at 8 p.m. and ends at 7 p.m. three bands and three callers including Lisa Greenleaf with Tidal Wave, Steve Zakon-Anderson with Perpetual e-Motion and Maggie Jo Saylor with Nor’easter. General admission $25, $20 seniors and students. For more information and to purchase tickets go to www.dawndance.org.

ENGLISH DANCE at the Stone Church, across from the Gison Aiken Center on Main Street, Brattleboro, Vt. 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. Adina Gordon calling and music by A Trip to Norwich. For reservations, visit www.absoluterealty.org/dance.

Fairs & Festivals

HAYDENVILLE CRAFT FAIR continues. See Saturday’s listing.

WHATELY HISTORICAL SOCIETY annual Spring Festival. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Center School, 218 Chestnut Plain Road, Whately. Plants, Historical Society books, notes, shirts, “Taddy Mouse Tales” written by Whately teacher Dorothy Polheumus (book, puppet, CDs). Hamburgers, hot dogs, finger foods, beverages available. Also, homemade donuts, pies desserts. Free ice cream from the “Milk Bottle.” Entertainment by Henry the Juggler, and music by Ruth Forman at the keyboard. A special exhibit will be “Whately Post Offices, Past & Present.” Priscilla Williams will demonstrate chair caning.

Music

THE ARTS BLOCK, 289 Main St., Greenfield: “The Touches of Sweet Harmony: Benjamin Britten’s Musical Roots.” 3 p.m. Colleen Jennings, violin; Scott Slapin and Tanya Solomon, viola; Rebecca Hartka, cello; Gregory Hayes, piano. $15 adults, $5 children 12 and under. Tickets available at the door or online at theartsblock.com. Wheelchair accessible. See Joseph Marcello’s Encores & Curtain Calls column Page D5.

“LOVE WILL FIND A WAY,” a concert featuring Pamela Mindell, soprano; Justina Golden, mezzo-soprano, and Clifton J. Noble, piano. 4 p.m. North Hadley Congregational Church, 243 River Drive, North Hadley. A selection of music by Bach, Brahms, Mendelssohn, Montverdi and Schumann and a premiere of new music by Noble. Reception to follow. For more information, contact Justina Golden at 585-8581, divafolk@verizon.net.

STRANGE CREEK CAMPOUT 2013 continues, see Friday’s listing.

Potpourri

HISTORIC DEERFIELD, “Three Bags Full: All About Wool” History Workshop continues, see Saturday’s listing.

MEMORIAL DAY CEREMONY at Rowe Veterans War Memorial in Rowe. 10:30 a.m. Patriot songs, reading of the Roster and historic poems, military firing squad and planting of flowers at the memorial.

MOSTLY YOGA: Sunday mornings from 10 to 11:15 at Wendell Free Library. Donation of $3 or more requested. A variety of yoga styles offered as well as chi-gong and psycho-calisthenics.All are welcome to participate in individual classes as it fits their schedules. Bring a yoga mat. Do not wear scents or perfumes. Through May. Final session.

MOUNT TOM’S ROCKS: Bedrock, Quarry and Stone Structures. 3 to 5:15 p.m. See old quarries, examine a variety of structures, including the Eyrie House ruins and the Stone House Visitor Center. Meet at the Stone House, 77 Christopher Clark Road, Holyoke. Approximately three-miles round trip, mostly well graded with some rough rocky sections. Easy pace. Free; $2 per vehicle entrance fee. Bring water, bug spray, wear sturdy shoes. For more information, call 584-6788.

PARADISE CITY ARTS FESTIVAL continues, see Saturday’s listing.

SHITAKE MUSHROOM INOCULATION workshop with Paul Lagreze at Just Roots Farm, 34 Glenbrook Drive, Greenfield. 10 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. $25. Park at the red barn. Learn to inoculate hardwood logs with shiitake inoculant spores. Each participant will get to take home an inoculated log, care for it, harvest and eat the shiitake production. Materials included. Registration required. Contact annie@justroots.org or pclagreze@gmail.com or 376-8333.

Theater

“DEATHTRAP” concludes. See Friday’s listing.

Monday 27

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Red Sox vs. Phillies plus NBA and NHL Playoffs on 14 HDTVs. 863-2882.

THE RENDEZVOUS, 78 Third St., Turners Falls: Dada Dino’s open mike. 8 p.m. Sign-ups at 7:30 p.m. Free. 863-2866, thevoo.net.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Red Sox vs Philadelphia at 7 p.m. Free pool all night in the sports bar. Country music with host Kathy and her candy bowl Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. Monday Madness with Big Dan in the Sports Bar. 773-8313.

Fairs & Festivals

HAYDENVILLE CRAFT FAIR concludes. See Saturday’s listing.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield is closed today for Memorial Day.

Literary

ALL CAPS SPOKEN WORD WENDELL, the last Monday of every month, through October. Deja Brew Pub,

57 Lockes Village Road Wendell. Doors open at 7 p.m., open mic at 7:30. 10 five-minute slots, two features writers. $1 to $5 sliding scale donation. www.humanerrorpublishing.com.

Music

STRANGE CREEK CAMPOUT 2013 concludes, see Friday’s listing.

Potpourri

PARADISE CITY ARTS FESTIVAL continues, see Saturday’s listing.

THE TURNERS FALLS FISHWAY on First Street, just off Avenue A in Turners Falls, will be opened today. The Fishway is opened Wednesday through Sundays, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. the facility is staffed full time by Fishway Guides to answer questions. The Fishway is within walking distance of the Great Falls Discovery Center and adjacent to the bike path.

Tuesday 28

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Free games of pool with each pitcher of beer. Plus, plus NBA and NHL Playoffs and Red Sox vs. Phillies on 14 HDTVs. 863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: 10 p.m. Latin Night. No Cover. www.iheg.com.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Red Sox vs Philadelphia at 7 p.m. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. Trivia at 7 p.m. Open Beer Pong tournament with Megan starts at 9 p.m. 773-8313.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: ■ Preschool Story Hour at 10 a.m. For children 5 and under. Weekly hour of story and craft time with Sally Ahearn. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Self-directed free writing time. Bring your own lunch and beverage. Music

FRESHGRASS presents Old Crow Medicine Show at MASS MoCA, 87 Marshall St., North Adams. 8 p.m. A festival of bluegrass and roots music. $35. For tickets and more information go to: massmoca.org.

Wednesday 29

Clubs

BETWEEN THE UPRIGHTS, 23 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Hump Night Karaoke in the Sports Bar hosted by Dirty Johnny, 9 p.m. to midnight. Plus, NBA and NHL Playoffs and Red Sox vs. Phillies on 14 HDTVs. No cover. 863-2882.

IRON HORSE, 20 Center St., Northampton: 7 p.m. the Hillbenders and Frank Solivan and Dirty Kitchen. $12.50, $15. www.iheg.com.

TAYLOR’S TAVERN, 238 Main St., Greenfield. Red Sox vs. Philadelphia at 7 p.m. Watch 11 50-inch HDTVs. Restaurant Appreciation Night. Come in wearing your work shirt or show a pay stub and receive a special prize from Big Dan in the Sports Bar. Free pool for bar/restaurant employees. Sign up for complimentary prizes and giveaways. 773-8313.

Dance

LINE DANCING at the Moose Lodge, 20 School St., Greenfield. 7 p.m. Beginner to intermediate. Ring the doorbell for admittance. $5 per session. For more information, call Pat at 665-4260, jokellogg@aol.com.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. ■ Sunshine Story Time. 10 a.m. Kay Lyons brings a blend of read-aloud, sing-along, play-along fun to families with young children. In the LeVanway Meeting Room. For more information, Lyons at 772-1544, ext. 5. ■ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. Monday through Friday. Self-directed free writing time. Bring your own lunch and beverage.
Music

MIDWEEK MUSIC at All Souls Unitarian Universalist Church, Hope and Main streets, Greenfield. Wednesdays from 12:15 to 12:45 p.m. Today: Pat and Tex LaMountain, singer-songwriters. $3 to $10 donation suggested. Make checks payable to Mid Week Music in care of All Souls Church, P.O. 542, Greenfield, MA 01302.

Potpourri

ARTIST PRESENTATION AND CONVERSATION with Phyllis Labanowski, “The Hoarder’s Daughter: How art helped me heal.” 6 to 9 p.m. The Art Garden, 14 Depot St. (in the Trolley Museum Building), Shelburne Falls. As part of a community exhibit, “Rx 4 HEALth,” some of the artists are exploring the role of art in healing and wellness. The presentations and conversations continue with artist activist Phyllis Labanowski. She will premiere a 10-minute video that reflects on her father’s death, the 800,000 pounds of garbage he left behind, and how art helped her process this traumatic event.

GREAT FALLS FARMERS MARKET, Avenue A and Second Street, Turners Falls, next to the Great Falls Discovery Center. 2 to 6 p.m. Fresh in-season local produce, perennials, annuals, vegetable plants, crafts and baked goods. Entertainment is frequently provided. Rain or shine. For more information, join the Great Falls Farmers Market on Facebook.

MEET AND GREET FUNDRAISER for Holly Mae Brown, a local pop-country artist from Charlemont who just shot her first music video with Enjen Video Productions for her single “Go Big or Go Home.” Brown will be heading to Boston on June 22 for a live call-back audition for the television show “The Voice.” She is raising funds to help defray costs of travel, wardrobe, video shoots and studio time. Shelburne Falls Eagles, 52 State St., Shelburne Falls. There will be music by DJ Bobby C, snacks, 50/50 raffle and a Chinese auction. For more information, contact Heather Brown at 413-522-2739.

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