P/sunny
74°
P/sunny
Hi 77° | Lo 50°

Arts & Entertainment calendar: June 19-25

  • Now in its fourth year, the Mutton & Mead Medieval Festival returns Saturday and Sunday to Turners Falls with more than 65 artisans, knights jousting on horseback, stage shows, dancers, jesters and fairies. Promoters also promise  unique musical acts and a children’s area with activities for kids, puppeteers and medieval characters. Reenactors will demonstrate skills such as cooking, textile arts, blacksmithing and sword play. People can also feast on delicacies including, turkey legs, roasted lamb, meads, beers, and ales. Pictured: “Sir Ian of Athol” attempts to capture a ring during one of the jousting events at last year's festival.<br/><br/>Recorder file photo/Trish Crapo

    Now in its fourth year, the Mutton & Mead Medieval Festival returns Saturday and Sunday to Turners Falls with more than 65 artisans, knights jousting on horseback, stage shows, dancers, jesters and fairies. Promoters also promise unique musical acts and a children’s area with activities for kids, puppeteers and medieval characters. Reenactors will demonstrate skills such as cooking, textile arts, blacksmithing and sword play. People can also feast on delicacies including, turkey legs, roasted lamb, meads, beers, and ales. Pictured: “Sir Ian of Athol” attempts to capture a ring during one of the jousting events at last year's festival.

    Recorder file photo/Trish Crapo

  • Recorder file photo/Trish Crapo<br/>Welcome to the age of Robin Hood<br/>Now in its fourth year, the Mutton & Mead Medieval Festival returns Saturday and Sunday to Turners Falls with more than 65 artisans, knights jousting on horseback, stage shows, dancers, jesters and fairies. Promoters also promise  unique musical acts and a children’s area with activities for kids, puppeteers and medieval characters. Reenactors will demonstrate skills such as cooking, textile arts, blacksmithing and sword play. People can also feast on delicacies including, turkey legs, roasted lamb, meads, beers, and ales. Pictured: Brian Tamulonis plays Will Scarlet, one of Robin Hood’s Merry Men and Kathryn Warde plays a Merry Woman during the 2013 festival. See “Fairs & Festivals.”

    Recorder file photo/Trish Crapo
    Welcome to the age of Robin Hood
    Now in its fourth year, the Mutton & Mead Medieval Festival returns Saturday and Sunday to Turners Falls with more than 65 artisans, knights jousting on horseback, stage shows, dancers, jesters and fairies. Promoters also promise unique musical acts and a children’s area with activities for kids, puppeteers and medieval characters. Reenactors will demonstrate skills such as cooking, textile arts, blacksmithing and sword play. People can also feast on delicacies including, turkey legs, roasted lamb, meads, beers, and ales. Pictured: Brian Tamulonis plays Will Scarlet, one of Robin Hood’s Merry Men and Kathryn Warde plays a Merry Woman during the 2013 festival. See “Fairs & Festivals.”

  • PARLOR ROOM, 32 Masonic St., Northampton: Boxcar Lilies and Brother Sun in concert. Friday, 8 p.m. Boxcar Lilies perform their signature mix of folk, country and bluegrass-tinged Americana music. Brother Sun fuses folk, Americana, blues, pop, jazz, rock and a cappella singing. $15. www.parlorroommusic.com.<br/>

    PARLOR ROOM, 32 Masonic St., Northampton: Boxcar Lilies and Brother Sun in concert. Friday, 8 p.m. Boxcar Lilies perform their signature mix of folk, country and bluegrass-tinged Americana music. Brother Sun fuses folk, Americana, blues, pop, jazz, rock and a cappella singing. $15. www.parlorroommusic.com.

  • SUNDAYS IN THE PARK at Greenfield Energy Park, Miles Street, Greenfield: Sunday, 6 p.m. Holly Near with emma’s revolution. Respected around the world for her music and activism, Near’s joy and passion inspire people to join in her celebration of the human spirit, say promoters, who add that her music fully engages listeners in the world around them. $15 suggested donation.<br/>

    SUNDAYS IN THE PARK at Greenfield Energy Park, Miles Street, Greenfield: Sunday, 6 p.m. Holly Near with emma’s revolution. Respected around the world for her music and activism, Near’s joy and passion inspire people to join in her celebration of the human spirit, say promoters, who add that her music fully engages listeners in the world around them. $15 suggested donation.

  • SUMMER SING hosted by Pioneer Valley Symphony. Tuesday, 7 p.m. Most Holy Redeemer Parish Hall, 122 Russell St., Hadley. Conducted by PVS Music Director Paul Phillips and PVS Chorus Director Jonathan Harvey. A casual read-through of Verdi’s “Requiem.” All voice parts are welcome. Bring your own score or borrow one. Soloists will include soprano Rachele Schmiege, mezzo soprano Eileen Ruby and tenor Michael Paul Krubitzer. There will be socializing and snacks afterward. $10. pvsoc.org.<br/>

    SUMMER SING hosted by Pioneer Valley Symphony. Tuesday, 7 p.m. Most Holy Redeemer Parish Hall, 122 Russell St., Hadley. Conducted by PVS Music Director Paul Phillips and PVS Chorus Director Jonathan Harvey. A casual read-through of Verdi’s “Requiem.” All voice parts are welcome. Bring your own score or borrow one. Soloists will include soprano Rachele Schmiege, mezzo soprano Eileen Ruby and tenor Michael Paul Krubitzer. There will be socializing and snacks afterward. $10. pvsoc.org.

  • Recorder/Trish Crapo<br/>"Sir Ian of Athol" attempts to capture a ring during one of the jousting events held at Saturday's Mutton and Mead Festival in Turners Falls.

    Recorder/Trish Crapo
    "Sir Ian of Athol" attempts to capture a ring during one of the jousting events held at Saturday's Mutton and Mead Festival in Turners Falls.

  • Recorder/Trish Crapo<br/>Brian Tamulonis, playing Will Scarlet, one of Robin Hood's Merry Men, and Kathryn Warde, playing a Merry Woman perform at Saturday's Mutton and Mead Festival in Turners Falls.

    Recorder/Trish Crapo
    Brian Tamulonis, playing Will Scarlet, one of Robin Hood's Merry Men, and Kathryn Warde, playing a Merry Woman perform at Saturday's Mutton and Mead Festival in Turners Falls.

  • Now in its fourth year, the Mutton & Mead Medieval Festival returns Saturday and Sunday to Turners Falls with more than 65 artisans, knights jousting on horseback, stage shows, dancers, jesters and fairies. Promoters also promise  unique musical acts and a children’s area with activities for kids, puppeteers and medieval characters. Reenactors will demonstrate skills such as cooking, textile arts, blacksmithing and sword play. People can also feast on delicacies including, turkey legs, roasted lamb, meads, beers, and ales. Pictured: “Sir Ian of Athol” attempts to capture a ring during one of the jousting events at last year's festival.<br/><br/>Recorder file photo/Trish Crapo
  • Recorder file photo/Trish Crapo<br/>Welcome to the age of Robin Hood<br/>Now in its fourth year, the Mutton & Mead Medieval Festival returns Saturday and Sunday to Turners Falls with more than 65 artisans, knights jousting on horseback, stage shows, dancers, jesters and fairies. Promoters also promise  unique musical acts and a children’s area with activities for kids, puppeteers and medieval characters. Reenactors will demonstrate skills such as cooking, textile arts, blacksmithing and sword play. People can also feast on delicacies including, turkey legs, roasted lamb, meads, beers, and ales. Pictured: Brian Tamulonis plays Will Scarlet, one of Robin Hood’s Merry Men and Kathryn Warde plays a Merry Woman during the 2013 festival. See “Fairs & Festivals.”
  • PARLOR ROOM, 32 Masonic St., Northampton: Boxcar Lilies and Brother Sun in concert. Friday, 8 p.m. Boxcar Lilies perform their signature mix of folk, country and bluegrass-tinged Americana music. Brother Sun fuses folk, Americana, blues, pop, jazz, rock and a cappella singing. $15. www.parlorroommusic.com.<br/>
  • SUNDAYS IN THE PARK at Greenfield Energy Park, Miles Street, Greenfield: Sunday, 6 p.m. Holly Near with emma’s revolution. Respected around the world for her music and activism, Near’s joy and passion inspire people to join in her celebration of the human spirit, say promoters, who add that her music fully engages listeners in the world around them. $15 suggested donation.<br/>
  • SUMMER SING hosted by Pioneer Valley Symphony. Tuesday, 7 p.m. Most Holy Redeemer Parish Hall, 122 Russell St., Hadley. Conducted by PVS Music Director Paul Phillips and PVS Chorus Director Jonathan Harvey. A casual read-through of Verdi’s “Requiem.” All voice parts are welcome. Bring your own score or borrow one. Soloists will include soprano Rachele Schmiege, mezzo soprano Eileen Ruby and tenor Michael Paul Krubitzer. There will be socializing and snacks afterward. $10. pvsoc.org.<br/>
  • Recorder/Trish Crapo<br/>"Sir Ian of Athol" attempts to capture a ring during one of the jousting events held at Saturday's Mutton and Mead Festival in Turners Falls.
  • Recorder/Trish Crapo<br/>Brian Tamulonis, playing Will Scarlet, one of Robin Hood's Merry Men, and Kathryn Warde, playing a Merry Woman perform at Saturday's Mutton and Mead Festival in Turners Falls.

Thursday 19

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: Open mic night hosted by Pamela Means. 7 p.m. Perform your own originals. No covers please. Free. Please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield. Noon to 2 p.m. Writer’s Lunch. The library’s meeting room will be open Monday through Thursday. This is a self-directed, free writing time open to any writer looking for a place to work through their lunch. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more information.

Music

THE 1794 MEETINGHOUSE, on the common in New Salem: Brother Sun in concert. 7:30 p.m. National Touring Artists Greg Greenway, Pat Wictor and Joe Jencks have made their mark as veteran touring singer-songwriters, but Brother Sun is no songwriters’ round, say promoters, who add that the trio’s harmonies, as much as their lyrics, “tell what they are about: warm as a campfire, stirring as a gospel church, rousing as a call to arms.” This band fuses folk, Americana, blues, pop, jazz, rock and a cappella singing. $15 adults, children 12 and under free. 978-544-5200, www.1794meetinghouse.org.

AN INTIMATE EVENING WITH ART GARFUNKEL, Academy of Music, Northampton. 8 p.m. Songs, anecdotes, prose and an audience Q&A session during an acoustic performance by Garfunkel. Assigned seating: $65 & $55 (service fees will apply). 413-584-9032 ext.105. http://academyofmusictheatre.tix.com

THE ARTS BLOCK, 289 Main St., Greenfield: Vimana with Mystics Anonymous. 8 p.m. Vimana is an informal collective of musicians who come together from a wide variety of western Massachusetts bands to create music. Each individual adds their own particular sound to the mix so that structure and melody grows, adapts, and evolves, say its organizers, who add “the concept of the residency at The Arts Block is to bring together other local bands that we admire and have a similar aspirations for sonic explorations. We like eclectic mixes of influences and hope that, in addition to showcasing two fantastic groups, we have an opportunity to have some moments of collaboration where the musicians can create something out of the moment that is unique and ephemeral, but memorable.” 774-0150, info@theartsblock.com.

COOP CONCERT at The Station, Greenfield Energy Park, 50 Miles St., Greenfield. 6 to 8 p.m. Performers: Joe Graveline, Jennie McAvoy and Small Change. The Energy Park is a short walk downhill from Main Street. These concerts are child-friendly. Bring something to sit on. Free, but donations to support the series are welcome. www.coopconcerts.org, www.greenfieldrecreation.com.

THE MARINA RESTAURANT, Putney Road, Brattleboro, Vt. 7 to 10 p.m. Kevin Parry hosts open mic every Thursday. Free. Half-price meals for performers. For information and to sign up, call 802-257-7563. www.kevinparrymusic.com.

SUMMER PATIO SERIES at Chandler’s, 25 Greenfield Road, South Deerfield. Music every Thursday at 6 p.m. Tonight: Lenny Zarcone performs jazz standards and Frank Sinatra. 665-1277, chandlers.yankeecandle.com.

Potpourri

ARTS BLOCK, 289 Main St., Greenfield: Third Thursday Comedy Night. Carmen Lagala, Mercedes Lake, Julie Waggoner and Mike Lemme.

NORTHFIELD FARMERS MARKET on the lawn in front of Coffee and Books, 105 Main St., Northfield. 3 to 6 p.m. Fresh local vegetables, fruit, milk, eggs, meat, baked goods, plants, jewelry and other hand crafted items. Musical entertainment. Every Thursday.

THIRD THURSDAY RIVERCULTURE event, “Knights, Camera, Action!” Downtown Turners Falls, Avenue A. 6 to 10 p.m. The Medieval-themed event will feature actors, musicians and demonstrations by Mutton and Mead and a group show at the Avenue A Storefront Gallery. There will also be a screening of “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” at 8:30 p.m. at The Shea Theagter. ElectropPop Duo Home Body performs at 7:30 p.m. Free. For a full schedule, go to www.turnersfallsriverculture.org.

Theater

“FOUND A PEANUT” presented by Actors Theatre Playhouse. 7:30 p.m. Brook and Main streets, West Chesterfield, N.H. Pulitzer-winning playwright Donald Margulies’ comedy of remembrance. A delightful look back to our formative “days of summer.” Taking us into 1962 Brooklyn, the play follows a group of children on their last day of summer vacation. Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. through July 12. Tickets $12 Thursdays, $15 Fridays and Saturdays. Reservations highly recommended. 877-666-1855, www.atplayhouse.org.

“LAUGHTER ON THE 23RD FLOOR” by Neil Simon presented by New Century Theatre. 7:30 p.m. Theatre 14, Mendenhall Center for the Performing Arts, 122 Green St., Smith College, Northampton. Continues through June 28. Neil Simon’s love letter to the writer’s room. Semi-autobiographical work is based on Simon’s time working as a writer on the Sid Caesar 1950s variety show “Your Show of Shows.” Tickets $30, $28 seniors; $15 for Student Rush tickets available on day of show only. Sunday at 7:30 shows are Pizza and a Play nights. All sets $18 plus a free slice of pizza.

Friday 20

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: Grace Morrison and The RSO with guest Slack Bird. 8 p.m. Americana indie-folk quintet and folk music collective from Jyvaskyla, Central Finland. Free. Please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Dance

AMHERST INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING: Every Friday night, 7:30 to 10 p.m. Bangs Community Center, Boltwood Walk, Amherst Center. Dances from the Balkans, Middle Eastern Europe, more. You need not bring a partner. Live music first Fridays of the month. Some teaching. Beginners welcome. Donation. 549-6748. www.amherstfolkdancing.org.

GUIDING STAR GRANGE, 401 Chapman St., Greenfield: Community music and dance party with music by Xopo. 7 to 11:30 p.m. Contra dance, David Kaynor calling. Balkan, Scandinavian, Zwiefachers and waltzes. Opportunities to play and sing with the band. No partner necessary; beginners welcome. All dances taught or led. www.xopoandfriends.net.

Films

“JEAN DE FLORETTE,” 1986 French film. 7:30 p.m. Pothole Pictures at 51 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls. The captivating and heartbreaking drama of a poor hunchbacked tax collector (Gerard Depardieu) who inherits farmland where he dreams of raising vegetables and rabbits. His dreams are shattered by a greedy neighbor (Yves Montand). 7:30 p.m. Ken Swiatek plays folk music tonight at 7. Repeats Saturday. Abdul Baki performs original piano works at 7. $6 adults, $4 children 12 and under. Handicapped accessible and air conditioned. 625-2896.

“WERE THE WORLD MINE,” feature film about boys in private high school. 7 p.m. Bruce’s Browser, 1497 Main St., Athol. The movie, centered on a performance of Shakespeare’s “Midsummer Night’s Dream,” includes original music as it tells the story of a “townie” who is taunted by his schoolmates. The handsome main character has much inner strength and wins the day with the help of a magic potion. Free. Part of Bruce’s Browser observation of Gay Pride Month. Discussion after the movie. www.brucesbrowser.com.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: ∎ “Mother Goose on the Loose,” 11 a.m. Join the happy circle with Kay Lyons at a lap-sit story hour for children ages 3 and under with a grown-up every Friday morning. Rhymes, songs and movement games make up this storytime style popularized by author Betsy Diamant-Cohen. In the Picture Book Room today. ∎ Writer’s Workshop. Noon to 2 p.m. Jane Buchanan and Joannah Whitney lead the program, which includes writing exercises and discussion as well as an opportunity to share what has been written. Participants encouraged to attend the open writing periods during the week. No charge; no registration required. Contact Buchanan at 772-1544 for more information. ∎ Open for Business. 2 to 5 p.m. Telecommuters and local business people looking for reliable Wi-Fi and a quiet space to work.

Literary

SUMMER SOLSTICE CELEBRATION Women’s Center open mic. 7 to 9 p.m. the Salasin Center, The Greenfield Women’s Resource Center, 474 Main St., Greenfield. Poetry and music. Bring poems, songs, a favorite dish to share.

THIRD FRIDAY OPEN PROSE and poetry Reading. 7 p.m. Arms Library, Bridge and Main streets, Shelburne Falls. Arrive before 7 p.m. to sign up for a five minute open mic slot; one 10-minute slot is available. Listeners welcome. Free. Handicapped accessible from downstairs. Last open prose until September.

Music

BAYSTATE FRANKLIN MEDICAL CENTER’S Clinical Notes, a hospital-based women’s a cappella chorus, performs. 12:15 to 1 p.m. in the hospital’s Conference Rooms A and B, 164 High St., Greenfield.

DJANGO IN JUNE: Academy of Music, 274 Main St., Northampton. 7:30 p.m. Latcho Drom and Samson Schmitt with Tim Kliphuis. A taste of jazz with je ne sais quoi. $25, $30 at the door. Continues Saturday with les Doights De L’Hommesee. See Saturday’s listing.

MONTAGUE BOOK MILL, 440 Greenfield Road, Montague. Dave Houghton and Fancy Trash with Steve Subirzi. 8 p.m. $6. Well-known in this area for its high-energy live shows, the Northampton-based Fancy Trash is releasing its new album “As Is.” Promoters tell us that Fancy Trash can play at a hush or a roar, with a nod to both American roots music and to indie rock.

ORANGE COMMUNTY BAND begins its summer Friday concert series at 7:30 p.m., Butterfield Park. Traditional marches, show tunes and various other selections, ranging from the 1800s Zampa” to the tune enjoyed by Red Sox Nation, “Sweet Caroline.

PARLOR ROOM, 32 Masonic St., Northampton: Boxcar Lilies and Brother Sun in concert. 8 p.m. Boxcar Lilies perform their signature mix of folk, country and bluegrass-tinged Americana music. Brother Sun fuses folk, Americana, blues, pop, jazz, rock and a cappella singing. $15. www.parlorroommusic.com.

PAUL OSCHER, legendary blues artist, in concert. 7:30 p.m. Next Stage, 15 Kimball Hill, Putney, Vt. $20 advance, $22 at the door. www.nextstagearts.org.

Potpourri

GIANT PARKING LOT PARTY. This annual event is hosted by the Community YMCA of Greenfield. 5 to 8 p.m. in the back parking lot of the YMCA. Some of the activities will include D.J. Tom Mayo playing music from the 1980s to today ,plus kids’ songs. There will be food for sale, a kids’ carnival, and Y-Zumba demonstrations. Also, a 40-foot inflatable obstacle course, a dunk tank, face painting, a petting zoo, pony rides, door prizes and a raffle.

RESTORATIVE YOGA at Community Yoga and Wellness Center, 16 Federal St., 2nd Floor, Greenfield. 5:30 go 7 p.m. DeDe Boyd and Barbara Polowy guide students in “active relaxation” using simple yoga props to support the body in a series of backbends, twists and inverted postures to cultivate profound rest and deep relaxation. To register call 774-4700 or email info@community-yoga.com., www.community-yoga.com. $15.

SHELBURNE FALLS FARMERS MARKET. 2 to 6:30 p.m. Baptist Corner Lot, Main and Water streets, Shelburne Falls. Third Friday Picnics during market hours. People are asked to bring a picnic dish to share and a chair. Vendors will have fresh salad fixings for sale with free salad dressings offered by the market. Through Oct. 24.

Theater

“FOUND A PEANUT” continues. See Thursday’s listing.

“SHAKESPEARE’S WILL” presented by Shakespeare & Co. 7:30 p.m. 70 Kemble St., Lenox. This provocative, one-woman play by Canadian playwright Vern Thiessen imagines the bold and unapologetic journey of Shakespeare’s enigmatic wife, Anne Hathaway, and the couple’s unconventional courtship and marriage, say promoters. Through Aug. 24.

“UNDER MILK WOOD” by poet Dylan Thomas presented by New England Youth Theatre. 7 p.m. 100 Flat St., Brattleboro, Vt. Repeats Saturday at 2 and 7 p.m. Set in a small fishing village on the coast of Wales, the play introduces a variety of characters who reside in and beneath the town. All tickets $10 and sold at the door. NEYT founder Stephen Stearns and Peter Gould, who perform as Voice 1 and Voice 2, will be joined, according to promoters, by a “dream cast of 10 alumni playing over 70 characters! Under Milk Wood is part vignette, part staged reading, part bewitching bedtime story that will take you down a road between dream and nostalgia to a place you have never been.” Tickets sold at the door. $12, adult; $10, seniors and students; $5 for NEYT summer students.

WOMEN’S CENTER OPEN MIC, Summer Solstice Celebration, The Salasin Center, 474 Main St., Greenfield. 7 to 9 p.m. Poetry and music. Bring a dish to share.

Saturday 21

Coffeehouse

MOCHA MAYA’S, 47 Bridge St., Shelburne Falls: Piece by Piece. 8 p.m. Somewhere between the hard rock and metal genre. Free. Please tip the musicians. 625-6292, info@mochamayas.com.

Dance

SIMBA SILVER SUMMER SOLSTICE Dance Party Extravaganza. 8 p.m. Evening Star Grange, East-West Road, Dummerston Center, Vt. Music by Simba. Members include Bob Stach, sax, flute, Dan De Walt, keyboard, steel drum, trombone, Wim Auer, bass, Derrik Jordan, guitar, percussion, violin, vocals, Steve Sonntag, trumpet, percussion, and Johnny Yuma, drums, vocals. Guest master drummer William Rodriguez. $10, family maximum of $25.

THIRD SATURDAY CONTRADANCE, Guiding Star Grange, 401 Chapman St., Greenfield. 8 to 11:30 p.m. The Moving Violations Trio is: Van Kaynor (fiddle), Ron Grosslein (fiddle, mandolin), and Eric Eid-Reiner (piano). Adina Gordon will be calling. Beginners workshop. 8:00 to 8:30 p.m.; Regular contras, 8:30 p.m. until break (couples dances near end of break); More complex contras after the break. $10 general, $8 for students. www.guidingstargrange.org/

Fairs & Festivals

BRATTLEBORO BREWERS FESTIVAL at Vabec Fields, 40 University Way, Brattleboro, Vt. 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Music, food and microbrews. $30 advance, $35 day of event. www.brattleborobrewersfestival.com.

MUTTON AND MEAD MEDIEVAL FESTIVAL, 210 Turners Falls Road, Montague. Saturday and Sunday. 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. More than 65 artisans and 40 hours of entertainment ranging from knights jousting on horseback, whimsical stage shows, dancers, jesters and fairies, and unique musical acts not seen anywhere else. Children’s area featuring activities for children throughout the day and puppeteers and medieval characters. Re-enactors demonstrate skills such as cooking, textile arts, blacksmithing and sword play. Turkey legs, roasted lamb, meads, beers and ales. $15 adults, $10 children and seniors; children under 6 free. Parking $5 per car. Rain or shine. Benefit for Food Bank of Western Massachusetts and Montague Common Hall.

ORANGE SOLSTICE RIVERFEST: 4 p.m. Along the river in the town of Orange. Family activities, crafters, music, food, floating fire pits, parachutes and an illuminated boat parade.

Films

“JEAN DE FLORETTE” concludes at Pothole Pictures. See Friday’s listing.

Library

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, Main Street, Greenfield. Opening reception to unveil and celebrate the art quilts created by local crafters for the “Library in Stitches” project. 3 to 5 p.m. Refreshments. In February, the library put out the call for willing quilters to create original wall quilts to beautify the walls at the library. Thirteen art quilts are being created by local crafters, each inspired by a word that invokes something you can do at the library — “Escape,” “Grow,” and of course “Read.” The quilts will be hung in the back stacks area of the library.

Literary

BARBARA PERRY of Shelburne and author of “Adventures in Yarn Farming,” and GAIL CALLAHAN, author of “Hand Dyeing Yarn & Fleece” will sign books at World Eye Bookshop, 156 Main St., Greenfield. 10 a.m. to noon. 772-2186. Plans for the signing include a dyeing demonstration, yarn displays and a “house lamb” named Snug.

Music

ALICE IVY-PEMBERTON AND ESTELA OLEVSKY will perform “Masterpieces for Violin and Piano.” 4 p.m. Buckley Recital Hall, Amherst College. Proceeds benefit St. Matthew’s School in Haiti and Mohawk Trail Concerts. $25 suggested donation. See Joseph Marcello’s Encores & Curtain Calls column Page D4.

DJANGO IN JUNE continues at Academy of Music, 274 Main St., Northampton. Les Doigts De L’Homme performs. 7:30 p.m. $25, $30.

CAMERON’S WINERY, 766 Swanzey Road, Swanzey, N.H. Summer concert series and summer events continue. 6 to 8 p.m. Tonight: Dan Fyffe performs soft rock, country. Reception for tim Lockhart, painter, and Aria Lockhart and Ed Wolski, sculptor.

MONTAGUE BOOK MILL, 440 Greenfield Road, Montague. Russell Kaback, singer-songwriter of Greenfield, will perform songs from his debut CD “Messages of Love.” “Words & Chords: A Solstice Songwriters Circle.” 8 p.m. $8.

THE RAGTIME FIVE performs music from the 1890s to the 1920s: Joplin rags, Sousa marches and other popular music of that time. 1 p.m. Music on Main concert on the lawn of First Church Congregational Church, 165 Main St., Amherst. Homemade strawberry shortcake and lemonade available at $5 a serving. Concert free. Bring lawn chairs or blankets. 253-3456.

THE SHEA THEATER’S Summer kick-off concert featuring locals Una Jensen and Holly May. They will be joined by some of the area’s best young talent including Kyle Woodcock, two-time Valley Idol Jr. winner. 3 p.m. Shea Theater, 71 Avenue A, Turners Falls. For more information visit www.theshea.org. See Sheryl Hunter’s column Page D1.

Potpourri

COLOR VIBE 5K — FUN RUN & COLOR DANCE PARTY, Franklin County Fairgrounds, 89 Wisdom Way, Greenfield. 9 a.m. For more informaiton, including the entrance fee: https://colorvibe.webconnex.com/greaterspringfieldarea2014

FRANKLIN COUNTY 4-H FAIR, Heath Fairgrounds, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Free. Wagon rides, poultry, sheep, dairy and rabbit exhibits. At 11 a.m. there will be K9 demonstration and working border collies will demonstrate later in the day.

GREENFIELD FARMERS MARKET, Court Square and Town Common. 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Locally grown and produced farm products and locally made crafts. Every Saturday. www.greenfieldfarmersmarket.com.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD: ∎ Hands-On Learning: The Lost Art of Letter Writing. Saturday and Sunday/ In the past, letters were thoughtfully written, read, re-read, treasured and often kept. Join us and write a letter to a special friend, a family member, someone nearby or far away. Craft your letter on lovely paper and learn how to use a quill pen or an ink pen. Make your own envelope, address the letter, close it with sealing wax and mail it. Drop in anytime, noon to 4:30 p.m. Free with Historic Deerfield admission ∎ Open Hearth Cooking Demonstration. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Hall Tavern Kitchen. “Cooking with Herbs.” Experience the signs, sounds and aromas of hearth cooking with the use of herbs, adding freshness and flavor to seasonal dishes. Continues June 28. Admission $14 adults, $5 children 6 to 17. Free for children under 6. 775-7214, historic-deerfield.org.

SUMMER SOLSTICE SUNSET KAYAK: 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. Barton Cove, Gill. Explore some of the celebrations from around the world and rich history and natural history of the cove. Ancient waterfalls, historic log drives, dinosaur footprints and nesting bald eagles are unique to this peninsula, cove and “narrows” on the Connecticut River. Appropriate for beginning and experienced paddlers. For ages 16 and older. Free with own kayak; $25 boat with kayak rental. Tandem kayaks available. Register by calling 800-859-2960.

SUMMER SOLSTICE observed at the Sunwheel at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. 5 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. the exact moment of the solstice is 6:51 EDT, marking the astronomical change of season when days are longest and nights shortest in the Northern hemisphere. Visitors’ astronomical questions will be answered. Organizers tell us the sunrise event will be more ceremonial and participatory in nature, including elements of ritual, personal reflection, poetry, song and meditation, along with teachings on the astronomy of the seasons. For more information, including a link to directions, go to www.astro.umass.edu/~young/gatherings.html

“WATCHING THE RIVER FLOW.” 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Mohawk Trail State Forest, Charlemont. This walk focuses on the different processes at work along a flowing river. Presented by Deerfield River Watershed Association and the Riversmart Communities. Day use fee of $5 per vehicle. Please carpool. Degree of difficulty: easy to moderate. extension.umass.edu/riversmart/.

Theater

“FOUND A PEANUT” continues. See Thursday’s listing.

“SHAKESPEARE’S WILL” continues. 3 p.m. See Friday’s listing.

“UNDER MILK WOOD” concludes. See Friday’s listing.

Sunday 22

Fairs & Festivals

MUTTON AND MEAD MEDIEVAL FESTIVAL concludes. See Saturday’s listing.

Music

NORTHAMPTON BREWERY, 11 Brewster Court, Northampton. Banish Misfortune performs traditional Irish hornpipes, reels, jigs, waltzes, polkas, airs and songs. 5 to 8 p.m. Every Sunday. Free.

QUABBIN VALLEY PRO MUSICA concert at the 1794 Meetinghouse, South Main Street, New Salem. 4 p.m. Featuring Renaissance composer Palestrinaa’s “Miss Brevis” and the Mass in G Major by early romantic period composer Schubert. Featured performers include Allison Pollitt, soprano; Ted Boren, tenor; and Chuck Berube, bass, as soloists in the Schubert and Lynn Boudreau, soprano; Christy Boudreau, alto; and Richard Chase, tenor, in the Palestrina. The 31-member chorus will also perform Healey Willan’s setting of “Arise, My Love” from the biblical Song of Solomon and Hubert Parry’s setting of William Blake’s “Jerusalem.” $15 adults and seniors. Children 12 and under free. Tickets at the door. www.1794meetinghouse.org.

THE SECRET SISTERS perform retro harmonies reminiscent of the 1950s and 1950s. Mixture of roots and pop. 6 p.m. MASS MoCA, North Adams. $29 advance, $35 at the door. 662-2111 Ext. 1, www.massmoca.org.

SUNDAYS IN THE PARK at Greenfield Energy Park, Miles Street, Greenfield: 6 p.m. Holly Near with emma’s revolution. Respected around the world for her music and activism, Near’s joy and passion inspire people to join in her celebration of the human spirit, say promoters, who add that her music fully engages listeners in the world around them. $15 suggested donation.

Potpourri

FIRST DAY OF SUMMER WATERFALLS AND BIG TREES HIKE, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Chapel Brook, Williamsburg Road, Ashfield. Explore Chapel Brook Falls and hike up to Pony Mountain. Learn how to identify the sizeable trees and about the cultural and geologic history of this unique reservation. Led by naturalist Aimee Gelinas of Tamarack Hollow Nature & Cultural Center. Cost: Trustees of Reservations members: $5. Nonmembers: $10 To register, call 413-532-1631 ext. 10 or e-mail: pvregion@ttor.org.

HISTORIC DEERFIELD: Hands-On Learning: The Lost Art of Letter Writing concludes. See Saturday’s listing.

MUSHROOM IDENTIFICATION WORKSHOP at Fiske Pond Conservation Area, Wendell 2 to 5 p.m. Join mushroom experts tony Thomas and Lisa Winter for a mushroom walk. Search for and identify in-season mushrooms. Wear appropriate footwear and apparel. Bring water, snacks, camera, notebook and bug repellent. To reserve a spot, contact mrsylvia@gmail.com or 824-2697. June 29 is the back up date in the event mushrooms are not in bloom.

NORTH QUABBIN CRUISERS, Athol-Orange Elks Club, Route 2A, Orange. 4 to 7 p.m. Classic and antique cars, trucks and motorcycles gather. Chicken barbecue and other food items available.

SOUND HEALING CIRCLE at Community Yoga and Wellness Center, 16 Federal St., 2nd floor, Greenfield. 10 to 11:30 a.m. Relax deeply with sounds rich with healing harmonics. David Kuhn, Sound Healer and vocalist Lauren Bernozzi, perform with gongs, drums, bells, crystal bowls and sacred voice. $15 to $20 sliding scale. Call 774-4700, www.soundweaving.com or email info@community-yoga.com.

WATERSHED HISTORY: THE GREAT HALL. 2 p.m. Great Falls Discovery Center, 2 Avenue A, Turners Falls. Originally built as a machine shop during the early days of industrialization in Turners Falls, the Great Hall building of the Discovery Center has a great story. Investigate tales of machines, fly fishing rods, historic preservation and more. You have a story to tell? Come tell it!

Theater

“SHAKESPEARE’S WILL” continues at 3 p.m. See Friday’s listing.

Monday 23

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: ∎ Sunshine Story Time, 10 a.m. Kay Lyons brings a blend of read-aloud, sing-along, play-along fun to families with young children. There’s half an hour of story time and a few minutes of visiting and play time for active young children made possible by funding from the Friends of the Greenfield Public Library. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544 for more details. ∎ Open for Business. 2 to 5 p.m. Telecommuters and local business people looking for reliable Wi-Fi and a quiet workspace. Mondays and Fridays from 2 to 5 p.m.

Music

MONTAGUE COMMUNITY BAND SUMMER CONCERT SERIES, Peskeompskut Park, Avenue A, 7 St., Turners Falls, 7 to 9 p.m. Free. Bring a picnic supper, blankets and lawn chairs.

Tuesday 24

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: ∎ Open for Business. 2 to 5 p.m.

∎ Preschool Story Hour. 10 a.m. Parents with kids 5 and under are invited for a weekly hour of story and craft time fun. Meet other people with small children and enjoy stories, songs, fingerplays and crafts with Sally Ahearn. In the LeVanway Meeting room. No sign up required. Free. For more information, call the children’s librarian at 772-1544, ext. 5. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Self-directed free writing time open to any writer who is looking for a place to work through lunch. Bring your own lunch and beverage. For more details, contact Jane Buchanan at 772-1544.

SUNDERLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, 20 School St., Sunderland: ∎ Minecraft @ the Library. 6 to 7 p.m. Game with your friends on the library’s speedy new computers, joining in competitions and collaborations. Grades 5 to 12. Drop in. Free. Continues Tuesdays through the end of July. ∎ Writing workshop. 5 to 6 p.m. Work with the author of a historical novel for tweens featuring author and illustrator visits and creative writing exercises. Make a book of the group??s collected writings at the end of summer. Grades 5 to 12. Drop in. Free. Continues Tuesday through the end of July.

Music

APPLE HILL CENTER FOR CHAMBER MUSIC, Nelson, N.H. In the concert barn. 7:30 p.m. Violin recital by Colleen Jennings of Apple Hill String Quartet and Maura Glennon, piano, and faculty at Keene State College performing J.S. Bach, Jennings, Boulanger and Elgar. $30, $15 students. 603-847-3371 Ext. 1, applehill.org.

BECK in concert at MASS MoCA, North Adams. 8:30 p.m. $50. Promoters tell us, “In the 20 years since ‘Loser’ hit the charts and introduced the world to an ironic poet of breathtaking musical range, Beck has become one of the most creative and idiosyncratic voices in 21st century music of any genre, mixing influences as disparate as hip-hop, anti-folk, and hi-fi funk into a sound completely his own. Two of his albums appear in Rolling Stone’s 500 Greatest Albums of All Time, four have hit platinum, and his just-released ‘Morning Phase’ is among his best.” www.massmoca.org.

A NATURAL CONCERT BAND Inaugural Concert Series. 7 p.m. Gill Common, 325 Main Road, Gill. Performing works of Holst, Reed, Schwartz, Walton and Williams. Professional musicians from the Tri-State area. Free. Bring chairs or picnic blanket. Family friendly. Refreshments available for sale. In case of rain, the concert will take place at United Church of Bernardston.

SUMMER SING hosted by Pioneer Valley Symphony. 7 p.m. Most Holy Redeemer Parish Hall, 122 Russell St., Hadley. Conducted by PVS Music Director Paul Phillips and PVS Chorus Director Jonathan Harvey. A casual read-through of Verdi’s “Requiem.” All voice parts are welcome. Bring your own score or borrow one. Soloists will include soprano Rachele Schmiege, mezzo soprano Eileen Ruby and tenor Michael Paul Krubitzer. There will be socializing and snacks afterward. $10. pvsoc.org.

Potpourri

HISTORY & ARCHITECTURE TOUR. Academy Of Music Theatre, 274 Main St., Northampton. 5:30 p.m. Free. History tour led by the Academy’s Executive Director Debra J’Anthony. Learn about the academy’s early days under the stewardship of the Lyman family; the creation of the first municipal theater company in the U.S., The Northampton Players; and the first woman to manage the academy, Mildred E. Walker, and the scandal that resulted from her appointment in the early 1940s. Each walking-talking tour begins promptly at 5:30 p.m. and is expected to run approximately one hour. Admission is free but reservations are required; attendance is limited to 20 per tour. Reservations may be made through the Academy of Music Box Office at www.academyofmusictheatre.com or 413-584-9032 ext. 105.

Wednesday 25

Dance

LINE DANCE LESSONS every Wednesday from 7 to 10 p.m. at the Moose Lodge, School Street, Greenfield. Beginner to intermediate. $5 per session. Ring the doorbell for admission. Beginner lessons at 7 p.m.; intermediate at 8. Call Pat at 665-4260 or email jokellogg@aol.com for more information.

Libraries

GREENFIELD PUBLIC LIBRARY, 402 Main St., Greenfield: ∎ Noon to 2 p.m. STEM Story Hour. Join Donna Rivers, educator and story reader, for this preschool story time focused on science, technology, engineering and math. Over the course of six sessions, families will build a STEM box of their own with tools and materials provided by the program. Registration at the Children’s Room. ∎ Writer’s Lunch. Noon to 2 p.m. Contact Jane Buchanan at 772-544 for more details. ∎ Chess Club. 5:30 to 7:45 p.m. Contact calderrossi@gmail.com with questions. The first Monday of the month will feature a speed chess tournament.

SUNDERLAND PUBLIC LIBRARY, 20 School St., Sunderland. Dance Club. ∎ 5 to 6 p.m. Explore different dances this summer; no dance experience required. Each lesson will teach one dance. Grades 5 to 12. Registration required. Wednesday through the end of July. Call 665-2642. Free. ∎ Tween Summer Book Club. 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. We’ll pick which books to read together and read one book every two weeks. Wednesdays through the end of July.

WHEELER MEMORIAL LIBRARY, 49 East St., Orange. Little Red Wagon Tour, 6 p.m. Student actors from the University of New Hampshire create an original comedy for the whole family using material from Mark Twain. Free. 6 p.m. www.orangelib.org, 978-544-2495.

Music

MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S LAWN CONCERT by Lissa Schneckenburger Band. 7 p.m. Forbes Library, 20 West St., Northampton. Free. Promoters tell us that fiddler and singer Schneckenburger is “a winsome, sweet-voiced singer who brings new life to old ballads and a skillful, dynamic fiddler who captures the driving rhythm and carefree joy of dance tunes old and new.”

SHELBURNE FALLS MILITARY BAND CONCERT, Arms Academy, corner of Church and Maple streets, Shelburne Falls. 7 p.m. Free.

Theater

“THE SERVANT OF TWO MASTERS” presented by Shakespeare & Co., 70 Kemble St., Lenox. The play gets a fresh take in the deft hands of director and long-time Company artist Jenna Ware. Her fast-paced and hilarious adaptation of this classic Commedia dell’arte farce by Carlo Goldoni features an adroit and energetic cast. 5:30 p.m. Preview tonight. Through Aug. 23.

There are no comments yet. Be the first!
Post a Comment

You must be registered to comment on stories. Click here to register.