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Revelers high-spirited at St. Patrick’s Day parade

  • OutVets founder Bryan Bishop walks past a group from Veterans for Peace during the annual St. Patrick's Day parade in Boston, Sunday, March 19, 2017. The parade's organizer, the South Boston Allied War Council, initially banned OutVets from this year's parade, saying it failed to comply with guidelines by carrying the rainbow banner last year. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer) Michael Dwyer

  • A group from OutVets marches in the annual St. Patrick's Day parade in Boston, Sunday, March 19, 2017. The parade's organizer, the South Boston Allied War Council, initially banned OutVets from this year's parade, saying it failed to comply with guidelines by carrying the rainbow banner last year. (AP Photo/Michael Dwyer) Michael Dwyer

  • Spectators cheer during the annual St. Patrick’s Day parade in Boston, Sunday. AP Photo

  • Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker, left, takes a selfie with An Yan, of China, while marching in the annual St. Patrick's Day parade in Boston, Sunday, March 19, 2017. Tens of thousands of people lined the streets for the parade which went off amid high spirits and without a hitch after a dispute over whether a gay veterans group could march.(AP Photo/Michael Dwyer) Michael Dwyer



Associated Press
Sunday, March 19, 2017

BOSTON — Tens of thousands of people lined the frigid streets of Boston on Sunday for the city’s St. Patrick’s Day parade, which went off amid high spirits and without a hitch after a dispute over whether a gay veterans group could march.

There was no shortage of green clothing, shamrock headbands and booze during the annual parade in South Boston. Some parade-goers said they would have attended no matter the outcome of the dispute over the OutVets gay veterans group.

The parade’s organizers, the South Boston Allied War Council, initially had voted against allowing marchers from OutVets, a group representing LGBTQ veterans. But organizers reversed the decision earlier this month after the stance drew backlash.

Spectators Jo Bunny and her wife, Lise Krieger, told The Boston Globe they had gone to the parade for the first time specifically to support the veterans.

“We should support them,” said Bunny.