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Olive Street to close for Greenfield parking garage construction

  • The route tractor-trailers will be taking to deliver concrete slabs to the Olive Street parking garage.

  • Olive Street will be closed from June 11 until July 14 for the next phase of construction on the parking garage in Greenfield. Friday, June 5, 2018. Recorder Staff/Dan Little

  • Olive Street will be closed from June 11 until July 14 for the next phase of construction on the parking garage in Greenfield. Friday, June 5, 2018. Recorder Staff/Dan Little

  • Olive Street will be closed from June 11 until July 14 for the next phase of construction on the parking garage in Greenfield. Friday, June 5, 2018. Recorder Staff/Dan Little

  • Olive Street will be closed from June 11 until July 14 for the next phase of construction on the parking garage in Greenfield. Friday, June 5, 2018. Recorder Staff/Dan Little



Recorder Staff
Tuesday, June 05, 2018

GREENFIELD — Residents can expect delays and traffic congestion downtown beginning June 11, when the next phase of the Olive Street parking garage construction begins.

Delivery of large pre-cast sections of the concrete for the garage will be routed down Main Street and Court Square daily for the next month.

Olive Street will be closed from June 11 until July 14, when 261 65-foot long concrete sections are delivered to the site of the future garage, plucked from the oversized trucks and swung and stacked into place. Traffic is expected to be affected during that time.

Delivery of materials and Olive Street closure will occur Monday through Friday, from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., according to John Benzinger, senior program manager for project management company Skanska. Parking at the corners of Main Street and Court Square and Bank Row and Olive Street will be restricted during the work. No work will be done on July 4.

Access will be allowed for some Olive Street businesses and residences as well as buses for the Franklin County Transit Authority, Benzinger said.

“Any time you close down a street or route, people will be inconvenienced,” Mayor William Martin said Tuesday. “We’re trying to minimize that as much as possible, but it takes time to move the pieces from one site to the other.”

Police Chief Robert Haigh expects traffic to be affected on both sides of Hope Street, as well as along Deerfield Street while Olive Street is closed. He urged residents to find alternative routes if possible, but said those who don’t know the area may affect traffic in the area.

Construction of a crane for moving the concrete slabs will happen June 11 and 12, followed by the transportation of the slabs via tractor-trailer beginning June 13.

Benzinger said 85-foot long trailers will bring the concrete sections to the site from Colrain Street. The trucks will travel via Colrain Road, down the Mohawk Trail to Main Street, then Court Square and Bank Row. Benzinger said this route is being used instead of Colrain Street to Main Street due to the large turning radius the tractor-trailers will need.

Each tractor-trailer can carry one concrete section. Between 12 and 15 sections will be delivered a day, with an average of about two an hour, Benzinger said.

“You will see immediate progress,” Benzinger said. “It’s hard to see anything because things were underground. Now you’re really going to recognize the progress.”

Police will help with traffic flow and detours for at least the first week of the project, according to Benzinger. Signs will also be in place to assist travelers.

According to Martin, the project is on pace to finish sometime in the middle of October and before the original deadline of Oct. 31. He said the project is expected to cost $10.1 million.

The anticipated cost of the project has changed over time. Originally, it was expected to cost $10 million, but underground stone foundations found in January caused the project’s estimated cost to rise.

Martin requested $529,271 in Federal Emergency Management Agency reimbursement from the City Council to cover the increased costs. The council approved $250,000. The money came from costs incurred by the city following Hurricane Irene in 2011.

To reduce costs, Martin made adjustments that included terminating the clerk of the works contract with Dome Design/Build from Shelburne Falls, which Martin said saved about $40,000.

The project was largely funded with state grants.

You can reach Dan Desrochers at:

ddesrochers@recorder.com

413-772-0261, ext. 257