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Northeast wakes up to deep snow, power outages

  • Brian Farrell, of Walpole, Mass., left, enters his home Thursday, March 8, 2018, after a tree fell on the house and a car, right, in Walpole. For the second time in less than a week, a storm rolled into the Northeast with wet, heavy snow Wednesday and Thursday, grounding flights, closing schools and bringing another round of power outages to a corner of the country still recovering from the previous blast of winter. (AP Photo/Steven Senne) Steven Senne

  • Residents on Mills Street dig out their car after a snowstorm dumped over a foot of snow around the area Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Morristown, N.J. The storm carrying wind, rain and heavy snow was expected to continue into Wednesday night. (Bob Karp/The Record via AP) Bob Karp

  • A man gets into a vehicle on a snowbank on the exit to a business along Route 23 during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Wayne, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) Julio Cortez

  • Men try to shovel a vehicle out of a snowbank along Route 23 during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Wayne, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) Julio Cortez

  • A lone commuter waits at the train station as snow falls in Stamford, Conn., Wednesday, March 7, 2018. Connecticut is expected to receive anywhere from 4 to 16 inches of snow. (Tyler Sizemore/Hearst Connecticut Media via AP) Tyler Sizemore

  • A pedestrian makes his way through the snowstorm that hit the east coast, including Greenwich, Conn., Wednesday, March 7, 2018. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has signed an order banning tractor-trailers and tandem trailers on Connecticut highways to help neighboring New York manage its traffic as highway conditions worsen because of the nor'easter. (Bob Luckey Jr./Hearst Connecticut Media via AP) Bob Luckey Jr.

  • Norwalk Police respond and close Creeping Hemlock Road after a tree fell on wires during the snowstorm on Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Norwalk, Conn. (Alex von Kleydorff/Hearst Connecticut Media via AP) Alex von Kleydorff

  • The Hilderbrand family, Gianni DeMasi-Hilderbrand, 6, front left, and Olivia Hilderbrand, 9, right, plays in the snow making snow angels at Richter Park in Danbury, Conn., during Wednesday's snowstorm, March 7, 2018. (Carol Kaliff/Hearst Connecticut Media via AP) Carol Kaliff

  • Hakeem Caul uses a shovel to help a family member dig their car out of the snow on Coram Aveue in Shelton, Conn., during the snowstorm that hit the area on Wednesday, March 7, 2018. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has signed an order banning tractor-trailers and tandem trailers on Connecticut highways to help neighboring New York manage its traffic as highway conditions worsen because of the nor'easter. (Christian Abraham/Hearst Connecticut Media via AP) Christian Abraham

  • A man clears snow off of his car on State Street in Danbury, Conn., during Wednesday's snowstorm, March 7, 2018. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy has signed an order banning tractor-trailers and tandem trailers on Connecticut highways to help neighboring New York manage its traffic as highway conditions worsen because of the nor'easter. (Carol Kaliff/Hearst Connecticut Media via AP) Carol Kaliff

  • Morgan Sanders, 83, of Dingman Township, Pa., sits in the garage area of the Dingman Township Volunteer Fire Department on Wednesday, March 7, 2018. She and her cats have been staying at the make-shift shelter for several days due to no power at her home. (Butch Comegys/The Scranton Times-Tribune via AP) Butch Comegys

  • Tow truck operators attach lines to a rolled over tractor trailer during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Wayne, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) Julio Cortez

  • A vehicle is seen stuck on a snowbank along Route 23 during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Wayne, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) Julio Cortez

  • People stand near a vehicle stuck on a snowbank along Route 23 during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Wayne, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) Julio Cortez

  • Men shovel snow while trying to free a vehicle stuck on a snowbank along Route 23 during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Wayne, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) Julio Cortez

  • Men push a vehicle stuck on a snowbank along Route 23 during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Wayne, N.J. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) Julio Cortez

  • "I hate it," Paul Frey said about the incoming storm as he sips coffee to warm up before walking home from Hannaford supermarket in Auburn, Maine, on Wednesday, March 7, 2018. "I'm going to be stuck in the house the whole day," Frey said the storm that is expected to bring over a foot of snow to the area. (Daryn Slover/Sun Journal via AP) Daryn Slover/Sun Journal

  • Residents sleep inside the Dingman Township Volunteer Fire Department in Dingman Township, Pa., on Wednesday, March 7, 2018, during the second snow storm that hit the region in Northeastern Pennsylvania in less then a week. The fire department has been used as a make-shift shelter for area residents who have no power or water in their homes. Its been running as a shelter since last Friday. ( Butch Comegys / The Scranton Times-Tribune via AP) Butch Comegys

  • Pedestrians walk along Delancey St. during a snowstorm, Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in New York. The New York metro area was hit with another winter storm Wednesday just days after another nor'easter hammered the region with high winds. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) Mary Altaffer



Associated Press
Thursday, March 08, 2018

NEW YORK — The Northeast is digging out from its second powerful nor’easter in less than a week that left behind some areas with more than 2 feet of snow, hundreds of thousands without power, school closures and travel chaos.

Some places saw more than 2 feet of snow by late Wednesday and many communities woke up Thursday to a foot or more of snow-covered cars.

The late-winter storm left more than 800,000 customers without power in the Northeast — counting some who have been without electricity since last Friday’s destructive nor’easter.

Montville, N.J., got more than 26 inches from Wednesday’s nor’easter. North Adams, Mass., registered 24 inches, and Sloatsburg, N.Y., got 26 inches.

Major cities along the Interstate 95 corridor saw much less. Philadelphia International Airport recorded about 6 inches, while New York City’s Central Park saw less than 3 inches.

The storm made traveling treacherous. Thousands of flights across the region were canceled.

It was not much better on the ground. Members of the Northeastern University women’s basketball team pushed their bus back on course after it was stuck in the snow outside a practice facility in Philadelphia. The Huskies were in the city to compete in the 2018 CAA Women’s Basketball Tournament. The team posted a video of the feat on its Twitter account.

Amtrak suspended service between New York City and Boston until at least 10 a.m. Thursday. New York City’s Metro-North commuter railroad suspended service on lines connecting the city to its northern suburbs and Connecticut because of downed trees. It was not immediately known when service would be restored.

“It’s kind of awful,” said New York University student Alessa Raiford, who put two layers of clothing on a pug named Jengo before taking him for a walk in slushy, sloppy Manhattan, where rain gave way to wet snow in the afternoon. “I’d rather that it be full-on snowing than rain and slush. It just makes it difficult.”

The storm was not predicted to be as severe as the nor’easter that toppled trees, flooded coastal communities and caused more than 2 million power outages from Virginia to Maine last Friday.

It still proved to be a headache for the tens of thousands of customers still in the dark from the earlier storm — and for the crews trying to restore power to them.

Massachusetts was hardest hit by outages, with more than 300,000 without service early Thursday. In New Jersey, the state’s major utilities reported more than 247,000,000 customers without power a day after the storm.

In Worcester, Massachusetts, public works crews late Wednesday had a hard time keeping up with the snow.

“It’s heavy. Well, it was so warm earlier that it just melted when it hit the ground and now it’s heavy,” said Jesse Nadeau. “It’s the heaviest part of the storm right now for the next couple of hours. Heavy and wet.”

In North White Plains, New York, 10 people were taken to hospitals with symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning after running a generator inside a home, police said. All were expected to survive.

In Manchester Township, New Jersey, police said a teacher was struck by lightning while holding an umbrella on bus duty outside a school. The woman felt a tingling sensation but didn’t lose consciousness. She was taken to a hospital with minor injuries.