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Medical marijuana dispensary on slate to open in March, CEO says

  • Patriot Care's medical marijuana dispensary, at the space of old American Legion building on Wells Street, is set to open in March, its CEO Bob Mayerson said. Recorder Staff/Joshua Solomon—

  • Patriot Care's medical marijuana dispensary, at the space of old American Legion building on Wells Street, is set to open in March, its CEO Bob Mayerson said. Recorder Staff/Joshua Solomon—



Recorder Staff
Tuesday, February 06, 2018

GREENFIELD — A medical marijuana dispensary, which has been approved to move into the city since May 2015, may be opening its doors in about a month.

Patriot Care CEO Bob Mayerson said his company’s dispensary hopes to open in March. The dispensary, of medical and not recreational pot, would be going into the old American Legion building on Wells Street. It would be the first of its kind in Franklin County.

Mayerson’s announcement came during his testimony at a Cannabis Control Commission public hearing Tuesday morning at the John W. Olver Transit Center.

“We are a proud participant of all the communities we participate in,” Mayerson said to the commission, referencing his shops in Lowell and Boston. “We’re very excited to open here in Greenfield. We try to become partners in the community. We’re proud of what we’ve done so far here in Greenfield.”

Currently, there is construction underway on the building, which is behind Green Fields Market.

Patriot Care has, in part, faced delays because of the condition of the building, Mayerson said.

Previously, it was announced that Patriot Care had signed a host agreement with Greenfield that includes a promise to contribute $10,000 to the Greenfield Education Foundation and to pay $25,000 a year in lieu of taxes — 50 percent of which will support local drug abuse prevention, treatment and education programs, veterans organizations, local food pantries and more. The agreement also includes Patriot Care’s commitment to give priority to local businesses for its heating and air-conditioning needs.

Also during his comment at Tuesday’s public hearing, Mayerson advocated for the commission, now finalizing its draft regulations, to take the process slowly. Mayerson said, “Social consumption places should be punted to the future,” advocating for the delay of possible pot cafes in town.

The CEO pushed for a crackdown on the marijuana black market, saying tax revenues from pot sales should be made available to state and local law enforcement to do this work.

“You guys are doing a great job,” Mayerson said to the commission. “We encourage you to do it right and slow down if necessary. It will still be here. It’s not going away. We will all end up with a better product in the end.”

You can reach Joshua Solomon at:

jsolomon@recorder.com

413-772-0261, ext. 264