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FBI probing Cohen’s ‘personal business dealings’

  • Attorney Joanna Hendon, representing President Donald Trump, right, talks to Michael Avenatti, attorney and spokesperson for adult film actress Stormy Daniels, second left, at Federal court on Friday. ap photo

  • Michael Cohen's attorneys Todd Harrison, right, and Joseph Evans arrive at Federal court, Friday, April 13, 2018, in New York. A hearing has been scheduled before U.S. District Judge Kimba Wood to address Cohen's request for a temporary restraining order related to the judicial warrant that authorized a search of his Manhattan office, apartment and hotel room this week. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) Mary Altaffer

  • Michael Avenatti, left, attorney and spokesperson for adult film actress Stormy Daniels arrives at Federal court, Friday, April 13, 2018, in New York. A hearing has been scheduled before U.S. District Judge Kimba Wood to address President Donald Trump's personal attorney, Michael Cohen's request for a temporary restraining order related to the judicial warrant that authorized a search of his Manhattan office, apartment and hotel room this week. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer) Mary Altaffer

  • Attorney Joanna Hendon representing President Trump, right, talks to Michael Avenatti, attorney and spokesperson for adult film actress Stormy Daniels, center, at the Federal court, Friday, April 13, 2018, in New York. A hearing has been scheduled before U.S. District Judge Kimba Wood to address President Trump's personal attorney, Michael Cohen's request for a temporary restraining order related to the judicial warrant that authorized a search of his Manhattan office, apartment and hotel room this week. (AP Photo/Andres Kudacki) Andres Kudacki



Associated Press
Friday, April 13, 2018

NEW YORK — Federal prosecutors revealed Friday that their probe of President Donald Trump’s personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, involved suspected fraud and the attorney’s personal business dealings, and was going on long enough that investigators had already covertly obtained his emails.

The details in court papers came as lawyers for Cohen and Trump sought to block the Justice Department from examining records and electronic devices, including two cell phones, seized by the FBI on Monday from Cohen’s residences, office and safety deposit box.

The raids enraged Trump, who called them an “attack on the country.” He sent his own lawyer to a hastily arranged hearing before a federal judge in Manhattan to argue that some of the records and communications seized were confidential attorney-client communications and off-limits to investigators.

Prosecutors blacked out sections of their legal memo in which they described what laws they believe Cohen has broken, but the document provided new clues about an investigation that the U.S. Attorney’s office in Manhattan had previously declined to confirm existed.

“Although Cohen is an attorney, he also has several other business interests and sources of income. The searches are the result of a months-long investigation into Cohen, and seek evidence of crimes, many of which have nothing to do with his work as an attorney, but rather relate to Cohen’s own business dealings,” said the filing, signed by Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas McKay.

Prosecutors said they took the unusual step of raiding Cohen’s residence and home, rather than requesting records by subpoena, because what they had learned so far led them to distrust he’d turn over what they had asked for.

“Absent a search warrant, these records could have been deleted without record, and without recourse,” prosecutors wrote.

The document was filed publicly after lawyers for Cohen appeared before U.S. District Judge Kimba M. Wood to ask that they — not Justice Department lawyers — be given the first crack at reviewing the seized evidence to see whether it was relevant to the investigation or could be forwarded to criminal investigators without jeopardizing attorney-client privilege.

Trump attorney Joanna Hendon told the judge that the president has “an acute interest in these proceedings and the manner in which these materials are reviewed.”

“He is the president of the United States,” she said. “This is of most concern to him. I think the public is a close second. And anyone who has ever hired a lawyer a close third.”

McKay told the judge that he believed the proceedings were an attempt to delay the processing of seized material.

“His attorney-client privilege is no greater than any other person who seeks legal advice,” he told Wood.

Cohen’s lawyer, Todd Harrison, told the judge: “We think we deserve to know some more of the facts about the underlying investigation in order to rebut their arguments. That’s only fair.”

Cohen wasn’t present for the hearing. Wood, who didn’t immediately rule, ordered him to appear in person at another court hearing Monday on the issue to help answer questions about his law practice.

In forceful language, prosecutors struck back at claims by Trump and others that the Monday raids violated the attorney-client privilege between Trump and Cohen, or amounted to an improper extension of the work of Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

As part of the grand jury probe, they wrote, investigators had already searched multiple email accounts maintained by Cohen. Those emails, they said, indicated that Cohen was “performing little to no legal work, and that zero emails were exchanged with President Trump.”