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Carter to Trump: shun military action, keep country at peace

  • Former President Jimmy Carter signs copies of his new book “Faith: A Journey For All” Wednesday, in Atlanta. The book will debut at no. 7 on the New York Times best-sellers list. AP Photo

  • Former President Jimmy Carter signs copies of his new book "Faith: A Journey For All" Wednesday, April 11, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis) John Amis

  • Patrons wait in line holding copies of a new book by former President Jimmy Carter as they wait for him to sign them Wednesday, April 11, 2018, in Atlanta. The book titled "Faith: A Journey For All" will debut at no. 7 on the New York Times best sellers list. (AP Photo/John Amis) John Amis

  • Former President Jimmy Carter, 93, sits for an interview about his new book "Faith: A Journey For All" which will debut at no. 7 on the New York Times best sellers list, pictured before a book signing Wednesday, April 11, 2018, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Amis) John Amis



Associated Press
Thursday, April 12, 2018

ATLANTA — Expressing pride in his own record of peace, former President Jimmy Carter warned that President Donald Trump should steer clear of any military action involving Syria or other world hot spots and avoid a nuclear attack at all costs.

“I pray that he would keep our country at peace and not exaggerate or exacerbate the challenges that come up with North Korea, in Russia or in Syria,” Carter said in an interview Wednesday. “I hope he realizes very profoundly as I did, and as other presidents have done, that any nuclear exchange could involve catastrophe for all human beings.”

The 93-year-old former president added that even a lesser military attack “is a dangerous thing” than can spiral out of control.

His remarks come as Trump continues to threaten attacks on Syria in response to a suspected chemical attack on civilians. As recently as Thursday morning, Trump said on social media that an attack would come “very soon or not so soon at all.” Russia has countered that such a move would have “grave repercussions.”

Trump has previously had threatening exchanges with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un but now says he’s in talks about having a summit with Kim. Carter has for decades advocated that the U.S. deal more directly with the insular communist dictatorship.

Carter made his comments as he touted a new book — “Faith: A Journey for All” — in an interview that touched on issues from Trump and the economy to disputes within American Christianity. An outspoken Baptist, Carter argues that Americans are experiencing the long erosion not just of spiritual faith but of confidence in public institutions.

“A lot of folks have lost faith in the superiority of democracy,” Carter told The Associated Press, noting widening wealth disparities and an endless cycle of wars and international entanglements.