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Nation & World Briefs


Wednesday, January 31, 2018
McGowan to Harvey Weinstein: There was no consent

NEW YORK — Rose McGowan says it’s time for Harvey Weinstein to drop his story about a “consensual” relationship.

“He can fall off the planet,” the actress said during an interview with The Associated Press on Wednesday. “My statement is truth. My statement is reality. Stop saying it’s consensual, you pig! You know it’s not true.”

Weinstein issued a statement Tuesday that quoted an alleged email from McGowan’s former manager, saying that the actress had spoken of a consensual encounter with him. Weinstein is accused by multiple women of sexual misconduct, revelations that helped lead to a wave of allegations against Matt Lauer, Charlie Rose and dozens of other men.

McGowan’s memoir, “Brave,” released this week, includes a detailed account of being assaulted by the movie producer in a hotel 20 years ago. Besides her comment to the AP, McGowan issued a statement Wednesday saying that his comments were part of an ongoing effort to “smear” her.

“It is an affront not only to Rose but to the hundreds of women who have come forward with their stories of harassment, sexual abuse and rape perpetrated by Mr. Weinstein and those like him,” the statement reads in part. “This is a sad, pathetic old-fashioned sexist attempt to undermine obvious truth and the gas lighting will no longer be tolerated.”

GOP congressman Gowdy will leave House

WASHINGTON — Rep. Trey Gowdy, a powerful GOP watchdog who built his name leading the investigation into the 2012 attacks against Americans in Benghazi, Libya, has become the latest prominent Republican to head for the exits rather than run for another term.

The former South Carolina prosecutor who is chairman of the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee said in a statement Wednesday that he planned to return to the justice system, though he did not elaborate.

The committee’s lengthy investigation into the attacks that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans focused heavily on Hillary Clinton’s role as secretary of state, though an 800-page report produced no smoking gun pointing to wrongdoing by her.

The investigation also revealed that Clinton used a private email server for government work, prompting an FBI investigation that proved to be an albatross in the Democrat’s 2016 presidential campaign.

Today, Gowdy is involved in one of the House’s Russia investigations and the leader of a renewed review of the FBI and Clinton’s emails.

Gowdy, 53, was elected in the 2010 tea party wave that returned control of the House to Republicans.

He is the ninth House committee head to step down, although several departing colleagues faced the prospect of being term-limited from that post or difficult re-election prospects.

Gowdy did not have such obstacles, which made his decision all the more surprising.

Trump reaches 45.6 million viewers for speech

NEW YORK — President Donald Trump reached an audience of 45.6 million people for his first State of the Union address, not enough to give him bragging rights over his predecessor.

The Nielsen company said former President Barack Obama drew 48 million people for his first State of the Union in 2010.

Trump’s audience was down from the 47.7 million people who watched his address to the joint session of Congress last February.

Fox News Channel earned the top spot among the individual networks, with 11.5 million viewers during the speech.

It was the first time that Fox News, home of Trump-friendly opinion hosts like Sean Hannity, beat all of the networks for the State of the Union, although Fox also was the network of choice for Trump’s address to Congress last February.

NBC (7.1 million) and CBS (7 million) fought for second place. The Fox broadcast network had 3.6 million, CNN had 3.1 million and MSNBC had 2.7 million, Nielsen said.

From Associated Press